(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Year-book of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution"

1895 

1896 




s''4': 



^%. 



'• ( 



GC 

973.3406 
S6C2Y, 
1895-1896 



5Sf4EALOGY COLL-ESTfaN 



l/ 



11 iiiipn^V.yriT.X. PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 00054 8674 



GC 

973.3406 
S6C2Y, 
1895-1896 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 



http://archive.org/details/yearbookofconne189596sons 




'^-^<f^^ey:^^^^ 




Mary Trumbull Williams. 



YEAR-BOOK OF THE 
CONNECTICUT SOCIETY 
OF THE SONS OF THE 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

FOR 1895 AND 1896 



Publication Committee 

HOBART LEGRAND HOTCHKISS 
JOSEPH GURLEY WOODWARD 
CHARLES PARSONS COOLEY 




PRINTED IN NEW HAVEN FOR THE SOCIETY IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT 
HUNDRED AND NINETY-SIX AND OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES THE ONE 
HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIRST 



COPYRIGHT, 1896 

BY 

THE CONNECTICUT SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Press of The Price, Lee &' A dkins Co. 





^J^^^ 


sss^ 


i 


Lv-J^^j |» ^t^ 


^^g^ 


i 




G^3fc.- '"=S 



11371:16 



CONTENTS. 




PAGE 

PORTRAITS OF WILLIAM WILLIAMS AND MARY {TRUMBULL) 

WILLIAMS^ Frontispieces 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE, 5 

BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1894-1895, 7 

BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1895-1896, 9 

BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1896-1897, 11 

CONSTITUTION • . . 13 

BY-LAWS 18 

INSIGNIA, 23 

REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 10, 1895, .... 27 

PRESIDENT TRUMBULL'S ADDRESS 30 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY, 35 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER, 37 

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR 39 

ORTRAIT OF JEREMIAH WADSWORTH, AND PICTURE OF THE 

WADS WORTH ELM, Facing , . . 47 

REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN, 47 

REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 11, 1896, .... 108 

PRESIDENT TRUMBULL'S ADDRESS m 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY, 117 

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR, 120 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER, 126 

REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN, 129 

PAPER ON THE DEFAMATION OF REVOLUTIONARY PATRI- 

OTS, BY JONATHAN TRUMBULL 178 

AN EXAMINATION OF THE CHARGE OF TREASON AGAINST 
GENERAL SAMUEL HOLDEN PARSONS, BY JOSEPH GUR- 

LEY WOODWARD, • . . 188 

A VINDICATION OF GENERAL ISRAEL PUTNAM, BY JONA- 
THAN TRUMBULL, 211 

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL JABEZ HUNTINGTON, Facing ... 219 

MEMBERSHIP ROLL, 219 

IN MEMORIAM, 543 

WILLIS R. AUSTIN, 543 

COURTLANDT G. BABCOCK, 546 

MRS. ABIGAIL JANE BALDWIN, 548 

MRS. HELEN MARIA BOYD BALDWIN, 549 

SETH W. BISHOP, 549 



4 

PAGE 

CHARLES BUTTOLPH, 550 

JAMES H, P. CHAMBERLIN , 551 

WILLIAM H. H. COMSTOCK, 552 

JOHN G. CRUMP, 553 

CHARLES J. COLE, 554 

BENJAMIN DOUGLAS 559 

RALPH C. DUNHAM, 561 

PROF. DANIEL C, EATON, 562 

ERASTUS GEER, 564 

JOHN M. HALE, 566 

JEREMIAH HALSEY, 566 

OSMUND HARRISON, ^ . 5^1 

SUPPLY T. HOLBROOK, 572 



DANIEL W. KISSAM, 



573 



IRVING W. LYON, 575 

AUGUSTUS W. MERWIN, , ... 578 

GEORGE H. MITCHELL, 579 

LUZERNE I. MUNSON, 580 

ISAAC W. OLCOTT, 582 

ALFRED W. PHELPS, 584 

S. DRYDEN PHELPS, 585 

GEORGE E. SILL, 586 

ALFRED L. SPENCER, 587 

JOHN W, STEDMAN, . . ' 588 

HENRY W. TAYLOR, 591 

WILLIAM A. M. WAINWRIGHT, 592 

JAMES WALKER, 598 

JOSEPH K. WHEELER, 599 

INDEX TO NAMES OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS, ... 603 




It having been decided by the Board of Managers 
that on account of the labor required and the expense 
attending the publication of the Society's book, it should 
be issued but once in two years, the Board of Managers 
on the 5th day of July, 1895, passed the following vote: 

" Voted : That the Registrar, Historian and Secretary 
" be and they hereby are instructed to prepare the next 
"Society's book for the two years ending May 10, 1896, 
"and that this Committee on Publication of the Society's 
"book be allowed discretion in printing the record of 
"social meetings." 

The latter part of this vote referred to the matter of 
abbreviating the report of exercises and speeches at the 
annual dinners. The committee began work upon the 
book about the first of July, 1896, and have forwarded 
the preparation and publication as rapidly as possible 
until it is now about ready to be issued. It was at one 
time contemplated to omit the detailed statements of 
services of ancestors which had appeared in former 
books, but a desire being expressed on the part of several 
of the members that the services should be reprinted in 
the present book, the Board of Managers left the matter 
to the discretion of the committee, and the committee 
decided on a republication; and also decided, on account 
of the merit of the addresses and other proceedings at 
the annual dinners, to publish them substantially in full. 

An address by Jonathan Flynt Morris at the unveiling 
of the tablet on the Wadsworth Elm, Hartford, may be 
found on page 48. In addition to this there have been 
prepared upon subjects of interest to the Society three 
papers which it was decided to insert. A paper on the 



** Defamation of Revolutionary Patriots," by Jonathan 
Trumbull, to be found on page 178; a paper entitled "An 
Examination of the Charge of Treason against General 
Samuel Holden Parsons," by Joseph Gurley Woodward, 
on page 188; and a paper entitled "A Vindication of 
General Israel Putnam," by Jonathan Trumbull, on page 

-211. 

The large membership of this Society; the number of 
new members who have been admitted during the two 
years prior to May 11, 1896; the changes by reason of 
death, and suspension for non-payment of dues, and the 
changes in the address of members, have rendered the 
preparation of this book a laborious one. It has been 
attempted to make the book more complete in several 
particulars. Among these are the insertion of the state 
numbers and the dates of admission of the members; 
the securing and publishing of the full names of mem- 
bers, where in some instances initials only had been 
used; the insertion of the occupation, and, in cases of 
death, the dates of death and a reference to the Year 
Yook and the pages where the record of the ancestor of 
such member, and his obituary, may be found. 

Errors have undoubtedly been made; but it is hoped 
that none of serious import will appear, and that those 
which do appear may be regarded as inseparable to a 
publication containing so many details. 

HOBART L. HOTCHKISS, 
JOSEPH G. WOODWARD, 
CHARLES P. COOLEY, 

Committee. 
December 21, 1896. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1894-1895. 



PRESIDENT. 

Jonathan Trumbull, .... Norwich. 

VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Ebenezer J. Hill, Norwalk. 

TREASURER. 

John C. Hollister, .... New Haven. 

SECRETARY. 

Charles P. Cooley, .... Hartford. 

REGISTRAR. 

Frank B. Gay, Hartford. 

HISTORIAN. 

Joseph G. Woodward, .... Hartford. 

CHAPLAIN. 

Rev. Edwin S. Lines, .... New Haven. 



HOBART L. HOTCHKISS, 

H. Wales Lines, 
Frank F. Starr, 
Everett E. Lord, . 
Franklin H. Hart, 
e. j. doolittle, 
Zalmon Goodsell, . 
Rowland B. Lacey, 



New Haven. 
Meriden. 
Middletown. 
New Haven. 
New Haven. 
Meriden. 
Bridgeport. 
Bridgeport. 



RuFUs W. Griswold, 
Henry R. Jones, 
Jonathan F. Morris, 
Frederick Miles, 
Oliver H. K. Risley, 
Francis T. Maxwell, 
Joseph G. Woodward, 



Rocky Hill. 

New Hartford. 

Hartford. 

Salisbury. 

Willimantic. 

Rockville. 

Hartford. 



DELEGATES TO THE NATIONAL CONGRESS. 



Edwin S. Greeley (at large), 

William E. Chandler, 

* William A. M. Wainwrigkt, 

John H. Swartwout, 

Frank J. Naramore, 

Stephen W. Kellogg, 

Lucius F. Robinson, 

John H. Perry, 

A. H. Chappell, 

Meigs H. Whaples, . 

f Albert C. Bates, . 



New Haven. 

New Haven. 

Hartford. 

Stamford. 

Bridgeport. 

Waterbury. 

Hartford. 

Fairfield. 

New London. 

Hartford. 

Hartford. 



* Deceased. 

t Elected to fill vacancy. 




BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1895-1 



PRESIDENT. 



Jonathan Trumbull, 



Edwin S. Greeley, 



John C. Holltster, 



Charles P. Cooley, 



vice-president. 



treasurer. 



secretary. 



Norwich. 
New Haven. 
New Haven. 
Hartford. 



registrar. 
Frank B. Gay (to July 5, 1895), . . Hartford. 
HoBART L. Hotchkiss (from July 5, 1895), New Haven. 



historian. 
Joseph G. Woodward, 

chaplain. 
Rev. Edwin S. Lines, 



HoBART L. Hotchkiss, 
Everett E. Lord, 
Zalmon Goodsell, . 
RuFus W. Griswold, 
Jonathan F. Morris, 
Frank F. Starr, 
Meigs H. Whaples. 



. Hartford. 
. New Haven. 



New Haven. 

New Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

Rocky Hill. 

Hartford. 

Middletown. 

Hartford. 



lO 



e. j. doolittle, 
William E. Chandler, 
Rowland B. Lacey, 
Henry R. Jones, 
Francis T. Maxwell, 
Loren a. Gallup, . 
B. Rowland Allen, 
Franklin H. Hart, 



Meriden. 
New Haven. 
Bridgeport. 
New Hartford. 
Rockville. 
Norwich. 
Hartford. 
New Haven. 



DELEGATES TO THE NATIONAL CONGRESS. 



H. Wales Lines (at large), 
Henry B. Harrison, 
Frank J. Naramore, 
John H. Perry, 
Samuel E. Merwin, 
Alfred H. Chappell, 
Edgar M. Warner, 
Russell Frost, 
Lucius F. Robinson, 
Rev. W. DeL. Love, 
Henry Woodward, 



Meriden. 

New Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

Fairfield. 

New Haven. 

New London. 

Putnam. 

South Norwalk. 

Hartford. 

Hartford. 

Middletown. 





BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1896-1897. 



PRESIDENT. 



Jonathan Trumbull, 



Edwin S. Greeley, 



John C. Hollister, 



VICE-PRESIDENT. 



treasurer. 



SECRETARY. 



Decius L. Pierson, 

registrar, 
hobart l. hotchkiss, . 



Joseph G. Woodward, 



Rev. Edwin S. Lines, 



Frank B. Gay, 

E. J. DOOLITTLE, 

L. Wheeler Beecher, 
Zalmon Goodsell, . 
Rowland B. Lacey, 
RuFUs W. Griswold, 
Jonathan F. Morris, 
Franklin H. Hart, 



HISTORIAN. 



chaplain. 



. Norwich. 

. New Haven. 

. New Haven. 

. Hartford. 

. New Haven. 

. Hartford. 

. New Haven. 



. Hartford. 

. Hartford. 

(Westville) New Haven. 

. Bridgeport. 

. Bridgeport. 

. • . Rocky Hill. 

. Hartford. 

. New Haven. 



12 



Edward D. Steele, 
Silas F. Loomer, 
Henry Woodward, 
* B. Rowland Allen, 
Henry R. Jones, 
Martin H. Griffing, 
Russell Frost, 
f Charles Hopkins Clark, 



Waterbury. 

Willimantic. 

Middletown. 

Hartford. 

New Hartford. 

Danbury. 

Norwalk. 

Hartford. 



DELEGATES TO THE NATIONAL CONGRESS. 

H. Wales Lines (at large), . . . Meriden. 

Everett E. Lord, New Haven. 

Edgar M. Warner, Putnam. 

Morris B. Beardsley, .... Bridgeport. 

Samuel Daskam, Norwalk. 

Stephen W. Kellogg, .... Waterbury. 

Joseph F. Swords, Hartford. 

Charles P. Cooley, Hartford. 

Walter Learned, New London. 

RuFUS S. Pickett, New Haven. 



SECRETARIES OF 

William E. Chandler, 
William M. Olcott, 
Ernest E. Rogers, . 
Frank J. Naramore, 
Charles A. Quintard, 
John M. Harmon, 



BRANCHES, 



Ex-Officio. 

. New Haven. 

. Norwich. 

. New London. 

Bridgeport. 
. Norwalk. 
. Meriden. 



* Deceased. 

+ Elected to fill vacancy 










CONSTITUTION. 



ARTICLE I. 

NAME. 



The name of this Society shall be the Connecticut 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

ARTICLE II. 

national society. 

This Society is a part of the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. It recognizes all 
State Societies of Sons of the American Revolution as 
co-equal and entitled to receive from this Society such 
assistance and information as may best promote the ob- 
jects for which these societies have been organized. 

ARTICLE III. 

objects. 

The objects of this Society are to perpetuate the mem- 
ory and the spirit of the men who achieved American 
Independence ; to encourage historical research in rela- 
tion to the American Revolution ; to preserve docu- 
ments, relics, and records of the individual services of 
revolutionary soldiers and patriots ; to mark, by appro- 
priate monuments, historic places within this State ; to 
promote the celebration of patriotic anniversaries, and by 
these and similar means to impress upon the present and 
future generations the patriotic spirit which actuated our 
ancestors and established the Republic of the United 
States of America. 



14 
ARTICLE IV. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Section i. Any man resident in Connecticut, and not 
less than twenty-one years of age, who is descended from 
an ancestor who with unfailing" loyalty rendered material 
aid to the cause of American Independence in the War 
of the American Revolution, either as a military or naval 
officer, sailor, soldier, or official in the service of any of 
the original thirteen Colonies or States, or Vermont, or as 
a recognized patriot whose services are of public record, 
shall be eligible for membership in this Society if found 
worthy ; and any man, wherever resident, who is de- 
scended from a Connecticut Revolutionary ancestor who 
performed like service, shall be alike eligible. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Section 2. Women may be admitted as honorary 
members, subject to the conditions as to age and descent 
established in the case of active members. 

applications. 

Section 3. All applications for membership in this 
Society shall be made in duplicate, upon blank forms 
furnished by the Society. They shall be signed with the 
full name and address of the applicant, and shall also be 
signed by at least one member of the Society nominating 
and recommending the applicant. 

ARTICLE V. 

officers. 

The officers of this Society shall be a President, a Vice- 
President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, a Registrar, an His- 
torian, and a Chaplain, who shall be elected by ballot for 
the term of one year, and shall continue in office until 
their successors are elected and qualified. 



IS 
ARTICLE VI. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Section i. There shall be a Board of Managers whose 
duty it shall be to conduct the affairs of the Society, 
which Board shall consist of the officers of this Society, 
the delegates to the National Society, the Secretaries of 
the several branches of this Society ex officio^ and fifteen 
others. 

Section 2. The Board of Managers shall have power 
to fill any vacancy occurring among the officers of the 
Society, the members of the Board, or delegates to the 
National Society. 

ARTICLE VII. 

MEETINGS. 

Section i. A meeting for the election of officers and 
the transaction of business shall be held annually, in the 
City of Hartford, on the loth day of May, (the' anniver- 
sary of the capture of Fort Ticonderoga by a Connecti- 
cut expedition), or if said day falls on Sunday then on 
the following day ; and a meeting for social purposes 
shall be held annually at such a time and place as the 
Board of Managers may determine. At each annual 
meeting there shall be elected, in addition to the officers 
provided for in Article V, fifteen members of the Board 
of Managers, one delegate at large and one delegate for 
each one hundred or fraction of one hundred exceeding 
fifty members ; said delegates, together with such offi- 
cers as are provided for by the Constitution of that body, 
shall represent this Society in all meetings of the Na- 
tional Society. 

Section 2. Ten members shall constitute a quorum 
at any meeting of this Society. 



i6 

Section 3. The hour for holding the annual meeting 
shall be 12 o'clock — noon — and the time and place for 
holding any special meeting shall be designated by the 
Board of Managers. 

Section 4. Special meetings of the Society shall be 
called by the President, when directed so to do by the 
Board of Managers, or whenever requested in writing by 
fifteen or more members, on giving fifteen days' notice, 
specifying the time and place of such meeting and the 
business to be transacted. 

Section 5. Special meetings of the Board of Man- 
agers may be called by the President at any time, and 
shall be called upon the request of five members of the 
Board, made in writing. Five members shall constitute 
a quorum at any meeting of the Board. 

Section 6. General business may be transacted at 
any special meeting of the Board of Managers, or of the 
Society. 

ARTICLE VIII. 
BRANCHES. 

LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS. 

Section i. Twenty-five members of this Society re- 
siding in any town or county of this State may send 
a written request to the Board of Managers asking 
authority to associate as a Branch of this Society in such 
town or county; and the Board of Managers may grant 
such request. 

name. 

Section 2. Local Branches shall be known as The 
Branch of the Connecticut Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, No. 



I? 



OFFICERS. 

Section 3. Each Branch may have a President, Sec- 
retary, and Treasurer, and such other officers as the 
by-laws of the Branch may determine. 

MEMBERS. 

Section 4. No person shall be admitted into a 
Branch, as a member, until after his admission into the 
State Society in the manner provided by the Constitution 
and Laws of this Society, and until he has paid the 
annual dues and fees as provided by said Laws. And 
any member, suspended or expelled, or in any way 
losing his membership in the State Society, shall there- 
upon cease to be a member of the Branch. 

BY-LAWS. 

Section 5. Each Branch may make by-laws, rules, 
and regulations for its government so long as such 
by-laws, rules, and regulations do not conflict with the 
Constitution and Laws of this Society, or with the Con- 
stitution and Laws of the National Society, 



ARTICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

This Constitution may be amended or repealed, pro- 
vided written resolutions to that effect are first presented 
to, and approved by, a majority of the Board of Man- 
agers present at any meeting of said Board; provided 
said amendments are subsequently approved by a ma- 
jority of the members present at any meeting of the 
Society; and, provided further, that whenever this Con- 
stitution is to be amended, repealed, or in any way 
changed, notice thereof, specifying said changes in full, 
shall be sent to each member of the Society at least ten 
days before such action is to be taken. 



BY-LAWS. 



FEES AND DUES. 



Section i. Applicants elected by the Board of Man- 
agers shall become members of this Society upon pay- 
ment of the membership fee and dnes for one year. For 
active members, the membership fee shall be three 
dollars, and the annual dues two dollars. For honorary 
members, the membership fee shall be fifty cents, and 
the annual dues fifty cents. The payment of thirty 
dollars by an active member or of five dollars by an 
honorary member at any one time, shall constitute the 
person paying such sum a life member, and such person 
shall thereafter be exempt from payment of annual 
dues. 

Annual dues shall be payable to the Secretary by 
enrolled members on the loth day of May in each year, 
but new members qualifying between the beginning 
of the calendar year and the date of the annual meeting 
shall not be liable for the payment of dues during the 
next succeeding society year. 

A member who shall remain in arrears for dues for 
three months after notice of his indebtedness has been 
mailed to him directed to his last known residence, may 
be dropped from the rolls by the Board of Managers, 
and may be reinstated in his membership by said Board 
upon the payment of his indebtedness to the Society. 

PERMANENT FUNDS. 

Section 2. All receipts from life membership shall be 
set aside and invested under the direction of the Board 



19 

of Managers as a permanent fund, of which only the in- 
come shall be used for the payment of ordinary expenses. 

MEMORIAL FUND. 

Section 3. There shall be a Memorial Fund to be 
used for the preservation of graves and monuments 
of Revolutionary soldiers and patriots ; the marking of 
historic spots ; and the purchase of historic places and 
buildings. This fund shall consist of all receipts from 
bequests, special subscriptions, and any regular funds of 
the Society, voted by the Board of Managers. 

SOCIAL MEETINGS. 

Section 4. The Society shall hold an annual meeting 
for the purpose of celebrating some event in Revolution- 
ary history, the time and place of holding such meeting 
to be determined by the Board of Managers ; and said 
Board shall also determine the manner of such celebra- 
tion. 

meetings of the board of managers. 

Section 5. The regular meetings of the Board of 
Managers shall be held on the third Tuesday of April 
and October in each year. 

presiding officer. 

Section 6. The President, or in his absence the Vice- 
President, or in their absence a chairman pro tem., shall 
preside at all meetings of the Society and of the Board 
of Managers, and shall have a casting vote. The presid- 
ing officer shall preserve order and shall decide all ques- 
tions of order, subject to appeal to the meeting. 

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Section 7. The President shall be the official head of 
the Society. He shall perform such duties as usually 
pertain to that office and as are designated in these By- 
Laws. 



20 

DUTIES OF THE SECRETARY. 

Section 8. The Secretary shall receive all money 
from the members, and shall pay it over to the Treasurer, 
taking his receipt for the same. He shall conduct the 
general correspondence of the Society ; shall notify mem- 
bers of their election and of such other matters as the 
Society may direct. He shall have charge of the seal, 
and such records of the Society as are not herein given 
especially in charge of other officers of the Society ; and, 
together with the presiding officer, he shall certify all 
acts and orders of the Society. He shall, under direction 
of the President or acting President, give notice of the 
time and place of all meetings of the Society and of the 
Board of Managers, and shall give such notices of the 
votes, orders, and proceedings of the Society as the 
Society or Board of Managers may direct. 

duties of the treasurer. 

Section 9. The Treasurer shall have charge of the 
funds of the Society ; he shall receive all money from the 
Secretary, and give his receipt for the same, which money 
he shall deposit in the name of the Society, and shall pay 
out for the benefit of the Society only, in such sums as 
the Society or Board of Managers may direct, and upon 
the order of the Secretary, countersigned by the Presi- 
dent. He shall keep a true account of his receipts and 
disbursements, and at each annual meeting shall make a 
full report to the Society. The books of the Secretary 
and Treasurer shall be open to the inspection of the 
President and Board of Managers at all times. 

DUTIES OF THE REGISTRAR. 

Section 10. The Registrar shall receive all applica- 
tions and proofs of membership. He shall examine the 
same, and report his opinion thereon to the Board of 
Managers. Imperfect and incorrect applications may be 



21 

returned to the applicant by the Registrar for correction 
■or completion. After applications have been passed upon 
by the Board of Managers, he shall, if the applicant is 
accepted, forward one copy to the Registrar-General of 
the National Society, and shall make a record of such 
parts of said application as he deems necessary, in a book 
of forms prepared for that purpose. The original appli- 
cation with the accompanying proofs shall be kept on file. 
He shall also have the custody of all historical, geograph- 
ical, and genealogical books, papers, manuscripts, and 
relics of which the Society may become possessed. He 
shall receive twenty-five cents for recording each ac- 
cepted application, and shall make a report in writing at 
each annual meeting. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Section ii. The Board of Managers shall judge of 
the qualifications of applicants for membership, and shall 
have control of the affairs of the Society. They shall ap- 
point an auditing committee and a committee on necrol- 
ogy. They shall have power to suspend or expel any 
member of the Society for sufficient cause, by a vote of 
two-thirds of the members of the Board present at any 
regular or special meeting ; provided, that at least two 
weeks' notice of such proposed action shall have been 
given to such member by notice mailed to him at his last 
known address. A member so suspended or expelled 
shall have the right to appeal to a meeting of the Society 
from the action of the Board of Managers. 



DUTIES OF THE HISTORIAN. 

Section 12. The Historian shall keep a record of all 
facts in connection with the Society which he may judge 
to be of historic value, and shall make a report in writing 
.at each annual meeting. 

3 



22 
DUTIES OF THE CHAPLAIN. 

Section 13. The Chaplain shall perform such devo- 
tional and religious duties as may be called for by the 
Board of Managers in the course of business or exercises 
of the Society. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section 14. These by-laws shall not be altered, 
amended, or repealed unless such alteration or amend- 
ment shall have been proposed in writing at a previous 
meeting of the Board of Managers, and entered upon the 
records, with the name of the member proposing the 
change, and also adopted by a majority of the members 
present at a regular meeting of the Society, or at a spe- 
cial meeting called for that purpose. 




INSIGNIA. 




SEAL. 



The seal of the Society is one and seven-eighths of an 
inch in diameter, and consists of the figure of a minute- 
man standing by the side of a plough, holding in his 
right hand a musket, and enveloped by thirteen stars ; 
the whole encircled by a band three-eighths of an inch 
wide, upon which appears the legend in raised letters : 
"Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Rev- 
olution, Organized April 2, 1889." 



24 




THE CROSS. 



Description: — Obverse: A cross of four arms and 
eight points, same size as the Chevalier's Cross of the 
Legion of Honor of France; arms enamelled white. In 
Ihe centre a gold medallion, bearing bust of General 
George Washington in profile, surrounded by a ribbon in 
blue enamel, on which, in gold letters, is the legend : 
^''Libertas et Patria^'' — the motto of the Society. A laurel 
wreath in gold and blue enamel encircles the medallion, 
midway between it and the points of the cross. Reverse : 
Same as obverse, except that the medallion bears the 
figure of a Continental soldier, and is surrounded by a 
l)lue enamelled ribbon, inscribed in letters of gold, 
** Sons of the American Revolution." 

The cross is surmounted by an eagle in gold, the 
ivhole decoration being suspended from the collar or 



25 

left breast by a ribbon of blue silk with white edges, and 
is intended to be worn on all ceremonial occasions at 
which the Society may assist or be present, on national 
occasions when in full dress, or (optionally) when the 
officer or member is in uniform. 

The following is from a " Study of the Insignia," sub- 
mitted by Major Goldsmith Bernard West, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Society for Alabama, by whom the design 
was proposed. 

" The cross of four arms and eight points, enamelled in 
white, is drawn from the cross of the ancient chivalric 
Order of St. Louis of France ; but the monarchical lilies 
which were placed between the arms have been left 
out. In their place we surround them with the laurel 
wreath of Republican victory. There are two good rea- 
sons for selecting the form of the cross of St. Louis as 
the groundwork for our decoration. It was the Grand 
Master of that Order, Louis XVI, who lent to America 
the aid she so badly needed to win the fight for national 
independence ; and nearly all of the gallant French 
officers who personally fought with and for the Colonies 
were Chevaliers of the Order. It is intended as a recog- 
nition of them and their services, and is a compliment to 
their country and their descendants that we propose, m 
some part, the form of the historic Cross of St. Louis. 

" The medallion in gold, which forms the centre of the 
cross on its obverse side and bears the bust and profile of 
Washington, appears too appropriate to demand explana- 
tion or argument. The legend surrounding it in letters 
of gold on a ribbon of blue enamel, '^ Liber tas et Fafrta," 
appears at once in keeping with the general design and 
in harmony with the principles and purposes of the 
Order. It has since been adopted as the motto of the 
S. A. R. 

"The reverse side of the cross is like the obverse, 
except that the reverse bears on the gold medallion the 
figure of a * Minute-man,' a type of those old Continental 
soldiers who 



26 

' Left their plouglisliares in the mold, 
Their flocks and herds without a fold,' 

and rushed to the defense of liberty and country at the 
first sound of the gun, the echo of which was ' heard 
around the world.' 

" The legend on the ribbon surmounting it is the full 
title of the Order. Surmounting the cross is the Ameri- 
can eagle in gold. 

*'The whole decoration is suspended from the left 
breast, or collar, by a blue ribbon with white edges. 
These colors of the Order are selected because of their 
signification, and because blue was the color of the 
uniforms of Washington's staff. Taken altogether the 
colors of the ribbon and decoration are the national 
colors — red, white, and blue." 

THE ROSETTE. 

The rosette is in the form of a button with a raised 
cup, made from the ribbon forming a part of the prin- 
cipal decoration. It is to be worn in the upper left-hand 
buttonhole of the coat on all occasions, at discretion, 
when the cross of the Society is not worn. 



The insignia may be obtained by Connecticut members 
on application to the Secretary of the Connecticut Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, at Hartford. 
The cross will be supplied at $9.00. The cost of the 
rosette is 25 cents. 




REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, 
MAY loTH, 1895. 

(Condensed.) 



The Sixth Annual Meeting of the Society was held in 
Putnam Phalanx Hall, Hartford, May 10, 1895. The 
meeting was called to order at 12.10, by President Trum- 
bull. 

The Chaplain, Rev. Edwin S. Lines, opened the meet- 
ing with prayer. The minutes of the last annual meet- 
ing were read and approved. The President addressed 
the society and read his report for the year (see page 30). 

The report of the Secretary was next in order, and 
was read (see page 35). 

The Treasurer's report was read (see page 37). 

The Registrar read his report (see page 39). 

The report of the Historian was submitted (see 
page 47). 

Mr. Morris, as Chairman of the Committee on Necrol- 
ogy, read the report of the committee and suggested to 
members who have knowledge of the death of any mem- 
ber that they communicate the fact to the Secretary. 

It was voted to accept the reports of the officers as 
read and to refer them to the committee on publication 
of year book. 

Messrs. Starr, Morris, Lacey, Hart and Doolittle were 
appointed a committee to report a list of nominations 
for officers for the ensuing year. 



28 



The committee reported as follows: 



For President, . 
Vice-President, 
Secretary, . 
* Registrar, 
Treasurer, , 
Historian, . 
Chaplain, . 

Board of Managers: — 
Hobart L. Hotchkiss, 
Everett E. Lord, . 
Zalmon Goodsell, . 
Rufus W. Griswold, 
Jonathan F. Morris, 
Frank F. Starr, 
Meigs H. Whaples, 
E. J. Doolittle, 
William E. Chandler, 
Rowland B. Lacey, 
Henry R. Jones, 
Francis T. Maxwell, 
Loren A. Gallup, . 
B. Rowland Allen, 
Franklin H, Hart, 



Jonathan Trumbull. 
Edwin S. Greeley. 
Charles P. Cooley. 
Frank B. Gay. 
John C. Hollister. 
Joseph G. Woodward. 
Rev. Edwin S. Lines. 



New Haven. 

New Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

Rocky Hill. 

Hartford. 

Middletown. 

Hartford. 

Meriden. 

New Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

New Hartford. 

Rockville. 

Norwich. 

Hartford. 

New Haven. 



Delegates to the National Congress: — 
H. Wales Lines (at large), 
Henry B. Harrison, 
Frank J. Naramore, 
John H. Perry, 
Samuel E. Merwin, 
Alfred H. Chappell, 
Edgar M. Warner, 
Russell Frost, 
Lucius F. Robinson, 
Rev. W. DeL. Love, 
Henry Woodward, 



Meriden. 

New Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

Fairfield. 

New Haven. 

New London. 

Putnam. 

South Norwalk. 

Hartford. 

Hartford. 

Middletown. 



* Mr. Gay resigned the office and Hobart L. Hotchkiss was elected July 5. 



29 

The report of the Nominating Committee was accepted 
and the above officers were duly elected. 

The committee recommended that the Registrar be 
given power to employ an assistant at the expense of 
the society. The matter was referred to the Board of 
Managers with power to act. 

The matter of the petition to the Legislature to print 
the records of the Revolutionary period in the hands of 
the towns of the State was referred to the Board of 
Managers. 

The meeting adjourned at 3.40. 

CHARLES P. COOLLY, 

Secretary. 




PRESIDENT TRUMBULL'S ADDRESS. 



Sons of the American Revolution : 

In entering, as we now do, upon the seventh year of our 
existence as a society, we may regard the record of onr 
six years with satisfaction; yet while we so regard it, 
the satisfaction is derived more from the possibilities 
which lie before us than from any consciousness of work 
accomplished, important as that work has been. It is 
the promise which our past record gives for the accom- 
plishing of our purposes in the future, and the impor- 
tance of maintaining and improving that record, which 
inspires us to-day. 

We enter upon the new year which now opens, encour- 
aged and animated by a sincere and hearty loyalty to 
our society and its avowed purposes. It is only by our 
strict adherence to those purposes that we stand as we 
now do, foremost in numbers and in our record of work 
accomplished, among the numerous societies of our 
order. We have, thus far, successfully avoided the dan- 
gers which always threaten an organization like ours. 
Snobbery, arrogance, or an assumption of false social 
position derived from membership have found no place 
among us. Political questions of the day which are 
foreign to our purposes have received no support at our 
hands as a society. We have made no attempt to influ- 
ence legislation except in cases where the legislation 
sought has been directly for the accomplishing of the 
purposes for which we are organized. We have devoted 
our energies to the dissemination of those patriotic influ- 
ences which will make political abuses impossible; and 



have not wasted our energies in organized warfare 
against these abuses. 

The erection of memorial tablets, the awards of prizes 
to the pupils of our schools for essays on subjects con- 
nected with the Revolutionary history of our State, the 
social gatherings and patriotic addresses at our annual 
reunions have all created in our society an esprit de corps 
which holds us together in a bond of patriotic fellow- 
ship, and which promises well for our future. 

The reports of our various officers will give you 
information regarding the details of our year's work, to 
which it is unnecessary for me to add. 

The omission of the publication of our year book for 
1893 was due to causes which will, as I believe, be satis- 
factorily explained in the publication now in the press, 
which will be a combined year book for the two years 
1893 and 1894. I wish particularly to record my thanks 
to the two members of our society who have undertaken 
the laborious task of editing this large and elaborate 
book, which will now soon be ready for distribution. 

It is particularly gratifying to notice that, in the 
preface of the first volume of the State Records of Con- 
necticut, which work will, when completed, cover the 
journal of the General Assembly and Council of Safety 
during the period of the Revolution, our society appears 
as having made the motion for this publication. To our 
fellow-member, the Hon. Hobart L. Hotchkiss, we owe 
our thanks for procuring, during his membership in the 
General Assembly, the passage of the bill which author- 
ized this valuable publication. 

The number of local branches organized under the 
provisions of our constitution has now increased to five, 
and it is expected that others will be formed during the 
year. In a society like ours, drawing its membership 
from all quarters of the State, and intending to dis- 
tribute its work impartially throughout the State, there 
is much which these local organizations may accomplish 
in furtherance of the general aims of our society. A 



32 

report has been called for from each of these branches; 
and it is hoped that each one will be reported by some 
one of its members at this meeting. Such reports, 
owing to the increasing number of these branches, 
should be made a feature of our annual meetings in the 
future, and will, I hope, stimulate the branches in a 
spirit of friendly rivalry in their various localities. 

As suggestive of the work which may be done by 
these local organizations, I recommend to our various 
branches : 

1. The adoption and carrying out of programmes for 
the observance of anniversaries connected with the his- 
tory of the Revolution, including, whenever it is possi- 
ble, church services, school exercises, and participation 
by citizens generally. 

2. The identifying and marking of the graves of 
Revolutionary patriots, and the localities of events 
which occurred in our State during the Revolution. 

3. Occasional contributions to local Revolutionary 
history in the form of carefully prepared papers by 
competent members of the branches. 

4. Public lectures, under the auspices of the various 
branches, by lecturers of acknowledged ability and 
authority, on subjects connected with the Revolution. 

5. Social gatherings in which the Daughters of the 
American Revolution shall be invited to participate. 

These recommendations are by no means intended to 
cover the entire field for work among the local branches, 
but simply to suggest a beginning of such work, and to 
define the lines which it should, in my opinion, follow. 

The Society of Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion has grown with great rapidity in our State during 
the past year; and in some localities has developed a 
degree of activity from which we may well take pattern. 
Let us always bear in mind that this society is of one 
family with our own, and wherever opportunity offers 
let us join hands with them in patriotic undertakings. 
The nature of our work continually impresses me with 



33 

the belief that it can, to a great degree, be best accom- 
plished by hearty and cordial co-operation of and with 
the Daughters of the American Revolution, in which 
belief let us invite such co-operation, as far as circum- 
stances will permit. 

Our failure to secure an appropriation from the Gen- 
eral Assembly for a memorial tablet to be erected upon 
the site of the birthplace of Nathan Hale raises the 
question whether this project should be abandoned by 
us, postponed to a doubtful reception by the General 
Assembly two years hence, or undertaken now as the 
unaided work of our own society. The latter course 
will, I trust, commend itself to you, and only requires an 
efficient committee to secure by popular subscription, 
preferably among our own members, the comparatively 
small sum needed to accomplish this worthy object. We 
can thus show that it is not the State alone that honors 
her heroes, and we can feel a pride in a memorial which 
is all our own. I recommend the appointment of a com- 
mittee to take up this work at once. 

The memorial tablet proposed to be placed in the War 
office at Lebanon has not yet been designed, so much 
money having been expended in the building itself that 
it was thought best to devote such funds as the society 
could spare for memorials in other portions of the State. 
It is hoped, however, that the finances of the society will 
admit of this expenditure during the year. 

One important and new feature has been added to the 
work of our society during the year. This is the prize 
competition among pupils in schools throughout our 
State for excellence in essays on subjects connected with 
the American Revolution. The results of this competi- 
tion show that the work is of the utmost importance, 
and that the value of its results can hardly be over- 
estimated. It is earnestly recommended that this offer 
of prizes to pupils in schools throughout the State be 
made a part of the yearly work of the society. While 
the branches offer occasional prizes in limited portions 



34 

of the State, it is believed that the State society itself, 
with the assistance of the branches, can perform this 
laborious but agreeable duty most systematically and 
effectively throughout the entire State. 

In closing this report I must avail myself of the 
opportunity to thank our officers and members for the 
cordial support they have given me in carrying out the 
plans 1 have suggested, and in suggesting many new 
and helpful measures of their own. Whatever sacrifices 
may have been made of time, work or money in connec- 
tion with our organization, carry with them the most 
satisfactory of all rewards — the consciousness of duty 
performed. May that consciousness continue to be our 
reward in the future as it has been in the past. 




1137116 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 



The Connecticut Society has now upon its rolls 995 
names. There are 800 active members in the society, 
which is 200 more than any other State society numbers. 
During the year past, 64 new members have been elected. 
In so large a society, numbering so many members past 
middle life, it is natural that we should lose a number 
each year; still our membership roll increases and there 
seems to be a genuine interest in the society, through- 
out the State. 

It is to be regretted that certificates of membership 
have not been issued more rapidly, but the delays in 
this matter and in the publication of the year book, 
though vexatious, have been unavoidable. It should be 
borne in mind that so large a membership entails upon 
the officers of the society a vast amount of work, and 
such work must of course be secondary to other and 
more important demands upon their time. 

The Secretary has received during the year for fees 
and dues, $1,565, which has been accounted for to the 
Treasurer. Ten dozen rosettes were sold to members 
during the year, and orders for a number of badges have 
been procured of the Registrar-General. 

The Board of Managers have held eight meetings dur- 
ing the year. Seven delegates represented the society 
at the National Congress in Boston. 

It should be a source of gratification to all, that the 
awarding of prizes to children in our public schools for 
essays on topics connected with the Revolution, was in- 
augurated this year. Great interest was manifested in 
the competition by both children and parents. One 
second prize and one certificate of honorable mention 
were awarded to children of foreign-born parents. It is 



36 

certainly a good thing for such children to learn of the 
heroes of our early history, and to acquire some knowl- 
edge of the basis on which our government was founded. 

In June a bronze tablet was placed upon the old Wads- 
worth Elm in Hartford, which stands near the spot 
where the old Wadsworth mansion once stood, and which 
was the meeting-place several times of Washington and 
Rochambeau. 

Some steps were taken looking toward legislative 
action in the matter of placing a suitable memorial to 
Nathan Hale, near the site of his birthplace, in Coventry, 
and it is worth while to record that in Vol. i of the State 
Records of Connecticut, published by the State, the fact 
is mentioned that those records were published at the 
instance of The Connecticut Society Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 

If we are to keep alive among the members an in- 
terest in the society, and make it of use to them and the 
world, we can only do it by accomplishing each year 
some work which will encourage veneration for the men 
whom we represent, and for the deeds which they 
wrought, and which will bring to both members and 
outsiders a broader knowledge of our country's history, 
and a deeper, purer patriotism. Every member should 
feel it his duty as the possessor of a sacred heritage to 
be himself worthy of his birthright, and to help others 
feel the privilege it is to be a citizen of the United 
States. " Dulce et decus pro patriae mori." While it is 
not, fortunately, necessary to fight now in support of 
country, it is necessary to have that eternal vigilance 
which is indeed the price of liberty. There is need now 
of patriotism in little things as much as there was need 
of patriotism in 1776 in greater things. 

Does any man feel pride in his ancestry? Let him 
show that he is worthy of that ancestry, 

— " for we inherit nothing truly 

But what our actions make us worthy of." 

CHARLES P. COOLEY, 

Secretary. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



JOHN C. HOLLISTER, Treasurer, in account with The Con- 
necticut Society Sons of the American Revolution. 



1894. 


May 10, 


II, 


12, 


June 18, 


July 10, 


Oct. 26, 


1895. 


Apr. 18, 


1894. 


May II, 


12, 


18, 


21, 


June I, 


Julys.?, 


10, 


II, 


24, 



Balance from old account, .... 

J. G. Woodward, sale of year book, 

Lucius F. Robinson, sale of rosettes, . 

John H. Perry, shingle memorial fund, 

Chas. P. Cooley, cash from Lucius F. Robinson, 

Chas. P. Cooley, cash for badges, 

Chas. P. Cooley, on account of dues, 

Chas. P. Cooley, on account of dues, 

Chas. P. Cooley, rosettes and badges, 

Chas. P. Cooley, on account of dues. 



J. G. Woodward's bill of expenses, 

C. W. Haskins, treas. general, national tax, at 50c 

C. W. Haskins, treas. general, six certificates. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., . 

The Charles H. Elliott Co., letter heads, 

Hartford Decorating Co., .... 

Tiffany & Co., badge for Governor Bulkley, 

C. P. Cooley, stamps, envelopes and expenses, 

The Fowler & Miller Co., for badges, . 

Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, printing applications 

Oct. 26, Chas. P. Cooley, badges and rosettes, . 
Chas. P. Cooley, petty expenses, . 
Chas. P. Cooley, rent of hall, annual meeting, 
Chas. P. Cooley, E. E. Lord, tablet on Wads 
worth elm, 

Nov. 9, The Hartford Printing Co., circulars, . 



Dr. 

I765.04 

38.50 

15.00 

5.00 

26 00 

25.00 

794-43 

374.25 

30.00 

394.25 

$2,467.47 

Cr. 

$51.17 

, 375-00 

6.00 

4.65 

11.45 

20.00 

25.00 

70.43 
12.50 
11.00 
30.00 

•75 
12.00 

11.50 

29.55 



38 



Dec. 



12. 



1895. 

April I, 

4. 

13. 

18. 



The Charles H. Elliott Co., letter heads, 

Belknap & Warfield, envelopes, 

Mary L. Rice, clerical work, 

W. A. Baker, autograph letter of Sam'l H. Parsons 

Isaac Garrison, care of war office one year, . 

C, W. Haskins, treas. general, dues Nat. Society 

F. H, Cogswell, report of annual banquet, . 

J. G. Woodward, prizes for essays, public schools 

Charles P. Cooley, disbursements, 

Curtis Dean, search and evidence as to Hale farm 

A. Mugford, electrotypes 

E. W. Emmons, engraving awards for prizes, 

Postage, 

Balance to new account, 



TRUMBULL TOMB FUND TRUST. 



Amount reported May 10, 1894, .... 
Interest on deposit, 

Amount of deposit, New Haven Savings Bank. 



$7.85 
3-2? 
15.00 
10.00 
25.00 

200.00 
36.00 

100.00 

49-25 

25.00 

12.50 

7-50 

.60 

304.52 



12,467.47 

I167.19 
6.74 

$173 93 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND. 



Amount reported May 10, 1894, 
Interest on deposit, 



$66.80 

2.58 



Amount of deposit, New Haven Savings Bank, . . $69.38 

JOHN C. HOLLISTER, Treasurer. 
May 8th, 1895. 

Audited and found correct. 

Franklin H. Hart, \ >t.,vv^^„ 
HoBART L. Hotchkiss, \ ^^ditovs. 







REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR. 



From May loth last year to the present time there 
have been received 150 applications for membership in 
this society. Seventy-five of these were approved by 
the Registrar and elected by the Board of Managers. 
All of the above number qualified as active members. 
Seventeen of the ancestors of the new members must be 
credited to other colonies than Connecticut. The serv- 
ices of only seven of these ancestors, from whom eligi- 
bility comes, were of a civil nature, all others were 
soldiers. Although our membership is principally in 
Connecticut, seven of our new members live in such 
widely separated sections as England and California, 
Illinois, Washington, D. C, and New York; and one is a 
member of another State Society of the S. A. R. 

The other applications received were examined, but 
were considered entirely defective, or lacking in some 
particular the necessary proof. These are all waiting 
in the Registrar's office. In most cases of this nature 
the claim is perhaps a sound one, but the applicants 
seem unwilling to take the trouble to clear the defects 
by adding the needed details, or else they are unac- 
quainted with the forms of what constitutes simple evi- 
dence. Forty -five supplementary claims have been 
filed, but not all accepted ; where there could be no 
question they have been passed. Many others are wait- 
ing opportunity for further examination. 

The correspondence of the office has been quite large, 
and over 170 letters have been sent; an hour or two of 



40 

search was needed freqnently before the writing of one 
short letter. 

The applications of those elected to membership in 
1893-1894, which had been held by the former Registrar 
for a year, pending the decision on matters affecting our 
relation to the National Society, S. A. R., by a vote of 
the Board of Managers, I forwarded to the R.egistrar- 
General at Washington. Before sending, however, man}^ 
had to be sent back to the applicants, with a letter re- 
questing that they be executed in a proper manner be- 
fore a notary or public officer, as this is required by the 
National Society. It took some months to get them 
returned again. Twenty or more are still to be heard 
from. 

Owing to the facilities afforded the Registrar by the 
Connecticut Historical Society, no books have been pur- 
chased for the use of his office during the year. One of 
very considerable value has been received by gift from 
the Minnesota Historical Society, viz.: a reprint of the 
" Letter from the Secretary of War communicating a 
transcript of the pension list of the United States . . 
. . June I, 1813." 

By some unwritten law of the society the Registrar is 
apparently held responsible for the editing and publish- 
ing of the year book. After a hearty, but unsuccessful 
effort to get others of the membership interested in the 
matter, Mr. Albert C. Bates and I undertook the task — 
Mr. Bates doing a large share of the work. Although 
the year book has been in press for over four months it 
is still far from completed. As none was printed for 
1893, this one will be unusually large. It was estimated 
at 425 pages, and it may reach 450. About 225 pages are 
printed and the type distributed; enough more is in 
proof sheets to bring the whole up to 300 pages. The 
delays in the work have been very vexatious, though 
unavoidable. Speeches had to be sent in proof to their 
authors for correction; the printing office ran short of 
type, causing a delay of three weeks while new type was 



41 

being cast. However, the worst is past and the work is 
now going on more rapidly. About one-half of the 
membership roll is in type, and the obituaries which 
follow it are all written. Certain small innovations will 
appear in the book, but the editors hope not to its detri- 
ment. In the roll of the society are inserted the names 
of all members who have died, with the name but not 
the services of the ancestor from whom they derived 
eligibility. In all new entries on the roll, the years of 
birth and death are inserted with the name of the sub- 
ject, in accordance with the best modern usage. Sup- 
plementary applications not on file at the date of the 
roll have not been included. 

A year ago to-day the former Registrar of this society, 
Mr. Woodward, declined to act longer in that capacity. 
After three years of service, for reasons good and suffi- 
cient to him, he felt compelled to resign the office — not, 
I feel sure, from any dislike for the duties of the place, 
disinclination to serve the society, or lack of enthusiasm 
for its objects. The policy of the National Society, as 
evidenced in its new constitution, seemed to him wrong 
in spirit, objectionable in aim and purpose toward the 
State societies, and especially harmful in tendency to 
the continuance, growth, policy and work of our own, 
the Connecticut society. Believing as he did, that the 
Registrar of the Connecticut society is best fitted by 
residence, acquaintance and knowledge to judge and de- 
termine finally upon questions relating to the claims 
and eligibility of applicants for membership, he could 
not consistently serve you longer. He probably felt * 
that there was no incentive for doing the necessary 
work of the office, if it was to be subject to review and 
final rejection, possibly, by a National Registrar, whose 
residence might be in either Florida, Washington or 
Alaska, and who would know nothing of the applicants, 
and have little opportunity, less means, and no personal 
interest in helping them to establish their claims to 



* I say " probably," because this matter is written without his knowledge or consent. 



42 

membership. With our State year book long promised, 
but unpublished, other local works commenced, but un- 
finished, owing to a lack of funds, he did not think it 
wise or just to make our membership pay doubled tax 
to the National Society; nor could he see that there was 
any adequate return for the amount paid. 

Quite reluctantly, I took the office. I found it a hard 
place to fill, for Mr. Woodward's extreme care and elab- 
orate methods had made the work much more onerous 
than I had supposed it to be. The year's work is still 
far from complete. A long sickness and my daily 
duties have left little time or strength for your matters. 

Many applicants for admission have been persistent 
and insistent, though not always consistent or consid- 
erate. Most of the would-be Sons offer in support of 
their claims only the evidence found in the book, 
"Record of Connecticut Men in the Revolution." Your 
Registrar has refused to accept this in most cases as 
conclusive, especially where there is the least doubt as 
to the identity of the ancestor with the person named 
in that book. In the case of a single appearance of 
a name in the volume, and with reasonable evidence 
that the residence of the ancestor and that of the 
soldier named are the same, and that there was no 
other person living of the name, this book may be 
accepted. But there are many errors in it; misread- 
ings of names, and the like: Lewis appears in print as 
Loomis, or vice versa; Moses reads Morse, and the Morses 
can all claim. Too many applicants take no pains to 
substantiate elsewhere the ancestor's service, and then 
feel deeply aggrieved that you question in the smallest 
degree the statement of eligibility, often showing that 
they consider your desire for more evidence as im- 
pugning their veracity. Nothing could be further from 
the fact. The Registrar questions only the applicant's 
knowledge of the facts independent of what is learned 
from that book. \i the claims as stated in the applica- 
tion are reasonably clear, showing on their face that 



43 

the applicant has carefully traced the genealogical line, 
has proved that the ancestor was living at the time of 
the service, and that there can be shown no reasonable 
doubts as to the ancestor's ability and willingness to 
serve, then if the identity of the ancestor with that 
of the person named in the printed record is shown, the 
proof is complete. Very few applications show all this 
when presented. On the contrary, they evidence the 
almost total lack of knowledge of ancestry, and the 
simplest kind of proof of service. For example: the 
name John Smith appears as enlisting from Fairfield; 
perhaps he enlists two or three times and his recorded 
services are always in connection with the names of his 
neighbors and friends living in that region. It is hard 
to make the applicant see that he should not claim this 
service for his ancestor John Smith, who, the Registrar 
finds after a deal of work, was born, married, lived, 
died and was buried in Windham county. Then, too, 
the applicant in his zeal for admission and pride in his 
ancestor, often claims an amount of service, which a 
little observation and thought would show him, that he 
can not prove. One applicant, the past year, claimed 
for his ancestor the services of at least three other men 
of the same name, but failed to show conclusively any 
service by the man from whom he was descended. 

Another quite remarkable instance, is that of a well- 
known and highly valued citizen of a large neighboring 
city. He offered a claim from a certain "A. B.," a resi- 
dent of a flourishing Connecticut town in 1776. The 
line of descent was easily proven — it was his own grand- 
father — and the evidence of service rested on town 
records, not on the printed book of Connecticut soldiers. 
A simple case, said I; but remembering that there was 
a considerable family of the name located in that town, 
I wrote to the local genealogist, giving him the claim. 
To my great surprise he told me that there were born 
in that town after 17 15 and before 1760, six males, who 
bore the same family and Christian names; any one or 



44 

all of them, so far as I knew, might have performed the 
service. The applicant was admitted on a well proven 
claim from another ancestor. The Registrar, however, 
is obliged to say over and over again, to the applicant 
who is positively sure that 'twas his great-grandfather, 
and none other, who did the service — " for, Mr. Regis- 
trar, don't you see that his name is printed!" — that 
sameness of name proves nothing. 

If there is any one thing which this society has done 
through the State, it is the kindling of an interest in the 
forgotten patriots, their deeds and their times. The 
blessed peace into which the fathers have entered would 
be rudely and I fear disastrously disturbed could their 
descendants communicate with the spirit world, with 
sufficient freedom to settle questions of eligibility. 
Some claims, however, would then never be presented, 
and the time and patience of the Registrar used for 
other purposes. It should be the pride of all applicants 
that they know something of the ancestor in addition to 
his name. That they are, in some degree, acquainted 
with his personality; his locality and his relation to it; 
his family relatives and friends. Oftentimes the con- 
firmation of slight evidence depends on just these insig- 
nificant family legends and stories. Although these 
shoiild never be accepted as proof in the absence of 
other and better evidence, frequently they add much 
weight to the general probability and throw light on 
service otherwise dubious, or, it may be, apparently 
excellent. 

A gentleman bearing a well-known name, and en- 
dorsed by one of our most valued members, presented 
his application a few months ago. His ancestor was 
Col. F., a wealthy man of the town of " X.," on Long 
Island, and its most important citizen. He was com- 
missioned by the Assembly of New York in 1775 to do 
necessary and patriotic duty. The record evidence of 
commission was clear and convincing, and the descent 
of the applicant equally so. There was apparently no 



45 

shadow of doubt of eligibility and I approved the appli- 
cation. But I wondered why the applicant claimed no 
other service for his ancestor. It seemed strange to me 
that this Col. F. had left no later records nor performed 
other deeds. And why did he not, living in that partic- 
ular part of Long Island; was he too old, incapacitated 
for duty, or a prisoner? I studied that application 
again, and after a half day's work I found that there 
was no proof that Col. F. did what he was commissioned 
to do; but there was evidence that he did take the oath 
of allegiance to the King, that he tried to administer it 
to his neighbors, that he did support the royalist cause, 
that he returned in 1784 or '85 from a long residence in 
London and settled on his estates, which he attempted 
to put back to their former beauty. There he continued 
to live out his Tory life. Now, a little knowledge of the 
condition of that small Long Island town during the 
War for Independence, or of the friends and family of 
his ancestor, would have saved our applicant some 
chagrin and the Registrar time and temper. 

This, and similar patriotic societies throughout the 
country, are correcting, adding to and making histor}^ 
It is our duty to see that this history has value, because 
of its reliability and the care with which it is made. 
Our society should have a new form of application, in 
which the authority for every statement made shall 
appear with the assertion. No matter how insignifi- 
cant the data, the source should be given to prove 
the facts. 

In closing, may I venture on another daring sugges- 
tion ? The work of the Secretary, Registrar, and editor 
of the Year Book, has become altogether too large and 
exacting to be considered a labor of love, and many of 
of you would not accept the work for the honors con- 
nected therewith. Some member should be paid a 
moderate sum to do the labor. Personally, I do not 
object to a larger yearly due to pay for this, but it may 
not be wise to urge this through the society at large. 
5 



46 

It could, however, be managed if our tax payable to the 
National Society were put back to its former figure. A 
reduced national tax was suggested as a possibility at 
one of our previous meetings. Hoping this will come 
to pass, I beg to offer this suggestion before other ways 
of spending our funds are adopted. 

FRANK BUTLER GAY, 

Registra7\ 
Hartford. 




■^■:-S- - ^' 




THE WADSWORTH ELM. 



REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN. 



In pursuance of the third article of our constitution, 
the Board of Managers in 1893 appointed a committee, 
consisting of Jonathan Flynt Morris, Joseph Gurley 
Woodward and Everett Edward Lord, to prepare a suit- 
able tablet for marking the place where Washington 
was entertained on his first visit to Hartford. The 
tablet was unveiled June 29, 1894, the anniversary of the 
event, with appropriate ceremonies. A procession, in 
which appeared the President of this Society; the Mayor 
of the city of Hartford, the Honorable Leverett Brainard; 
the President of the Connecticut Historical Society, 
Charles Jeremy Hoadly, LL. D.; the President of the 
Wadsworth Athenaeum, the Reverend Francis Goodwin; 
■several descendants of Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth, 
and representatives of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, marched from the rooms of the Hartford 
Library to the foot of the tree to which the tablet had 
been affixed. It stands in front of the Wadsworth Athe- 
naeum, which occupies the site on which Colonel Wads- 
worth's house stood during the revolution. 

The assembly was called to order by President Jon- 
athan Trumbull. 

Prayer was offered by the Chaplain, the Reverend 
Edwin S. Lines. 

The President introduced Mr. Jonathan Flynt Morris, 
who spoke as follows : 



48 

MR. MORRIS'S ADDRESS. 

Among the acts of the General Assembly of Connecticut at the 
outbreak of the Revolution in 1775 was one raising six regiments 
of troops for the defense of the colony and appointing officers 
for them. David Wooster was appointed major-general and Joseph 
Spencer and Israel Putnam generals of brigade. This was immedi- 
ately followed by the organization of a commissary department for 
the supply of those troops with provisions and war material. Captain 
Joseph Trumbull was appointed commissary general, and nine other 
gentlemen from the several counties of the colony were appointed 
deputy commissaries. One of these was Captain Jeremiah Wads- 
worth of Hartford. He was the son of the Rev. Daniel Wadsworth, 
pastor of the First Church in Hartford, and was born in 1743 in a 
house built by his father about 1731, on the spot where we are now 
gathered. He was barely four years old when his father died. At an 
early age he went to Middletown to live with his maternal uncle, 
Mathew Talcott, a prominent merchant there. When about seven- 
teen years old his health failed him, and for its recovery he shipped 
as a sailor on one of his uncle's vessels. Recovering his health by his 
life at sea, he continued in it as sailor, mate, and finally master, mak- 
ing voyages to the West Indies. In 1767 he married Mehitable, 
daughter of the Rev. William Russell of Middletown. In 1773 his 
mother died and he returned to Hartford to make his home with his 
two maiden sisters in the house in which he was born. He had now 
practically retired from his sea-faring life, although he still continued 
interested in commerce and shipping. At the outbreak of the Revo- 
lution and his appointment as deputy commissary he was in his 
thirty-second year. He at once engaged in the duties of his office 
with a zeal and energy which characterized him throughout the w'ar. 
For about six months after his appointment he kept a diary of his 
daily work. This diary shows the greatest diligence in the discharge 
of his duties, with scarcely any period of rest. His house at once 
became the store of the commissary and the rendezvous of soldiers. 
Let me quote a few of his daily experiences. 

Tuesday, May 9, 1775 — Received of Treasurer Lawrence ^115 for 
an order from Messrs. Seymour and Ellsworth,* kept two yoke of 
cattle last night, paid Elisha Skinner 3 shillings per cwt, in paper 
money and 42 shillings in silver — finished collecting peas and beans 
and loaded cart a. m. At 2 p. m. the cart crossed the ferry, at 4 set 
off from Benjamin's with the load and I went to Glastonbury and 
agreed with Cables to bake 150 cwt. of bread at 3 shillings per cwt. if 
I found wheat at 18 shillings per cwt. for the bread put up and he to- 
pay half the transportation to Hartford. 

* Thomas Seymour and Oliver Ellsworth of the Committee of the Pay Table. 



49 

May i6 — This morning set out for Middletown, went to Mr. Alsop's, 
agreed for all his cloth for tents, agreed with the salemaker Sanford 
to go to work with all his hands and give all possible dispatch, 
agreed with Captain Maliner for the lines at a reasonable rate as 
others would supply them, the twine to be bought by the sailmaker. 
At 8 o'clock left Middletown, went to Rocky Hill and found 300 yards 
of cloth with Pomeroy for Alsop, spent one shilling and four pence, 
€ame home at 10, rode hard. My house has been haunted for three 
days. 

Thursday, i8th — This morning Captain Pettibpne called and Cap- 
tain Chester and many others for teams — went to General Spencer — 
some want syder, some rum, all something that is not granted. 

" There are no Sundays in revolutionary times," said Mr. Webster. 
Captain Wadsworth found this to be so. Only twice during the six 
months that his diary runs does he mention his attendance on divine 
worship. Under the date of Sunday, May 21, 1775, he wrote : Sent 
Jed Goodrich to Glastonbury to Cables about the bread. Received of 
Mr. Fitch 10,000 flints for Windham county, 5,000 for New London 
county, 5,000 for Norwich. Agreed with Mr. Meers to go to Wind- 
ham and carry 10,000 flints to-morrow morning. William Nichols * 
arrived with the officers from Ticonderoga. Monday, May 22, Mr. 
Mears failed on account of the rain— agreed with Mr. Barthelemy to 
go and carry the flints — he failed. The regular soldiers came in. 
Captain Smith and Captain Wadsworth came and took a barrel of 
pork and part of a hogshead of bread belonging to the government. 

Tuesday, May 23 — Captain Pettibone's people came in early — re- 
ceived pork and cooked it in the kitchen — drank one and one-half 
buckets of cyder, delivered them their articles and they got over the 
ferry at 8 a. m. Was called on by twenty odd people about various 
matters. 

Friday morning, May 26 — Went to the prison and took the names 
of the prisoners, f etc. Lieutenant Cooper's company came, forty- 
eight men, dealt out their provisions and fatigue rum— three gallons 
— they filled my house, cooked and ate their victuals, drank two gal- 
lons of cider, spent this afternoon into the evening with the boys in 
delivering them their provisions. 

These quotations from Captain Wadsworth's diary are longer than 
would seem necessary for this brief address. I have not quoted the 
transactions in full, but enough to show the activity displayed by 
Captain Wadsworth in the discharge of his duties and to picture some 
of the minor scenes of the Revolution acted on the spot where we 
now are. 



* William Nichols of Hartford, afterwards paymaster in Colonel Thomas Swift's 
regiment. He removed to New Lebanon, N. Y., towards the close of the century. 
+ British officers and soldiers taken at Ticonderoga. 



50 . • 

On the 15th of June, 1775, the Continental Congress, then in session 
in Philadelphia, passed the following resolution : 

" Resolved, That a General be appointed to command all the Con- 
tinental forces raised or to be raised for the defense of American 
Liberty." A ballot was taken and George Washington was unani- 
mously chosen General. He was at that time a delegate to the Con- 
gress from Virginia and forty-three years of age. He had long been 
in military life and had distinguished himself by his ability and 
bravery and had borne for twenty-one years the rank of Colonel. 
The method of his election I need not recite.* On the 17th he w^as 
commissioned, and Artemas Ward of Massachusetts and Charles Lee 
of Virginia were chosen major-generals. On the 19th Philip Schuyler 
of New York was chosen major-general and Israel Putnam of Con- 
necticut was chosen brigadier, and Washington received his com- 
mission. On the 20th he reviewed the militia and troops of Philadel- 
phia. On the 22d he was given a farewell supper by the citizens of 
Philadelphia. On Friday the 23d he left Philadelphia with Major 
Thomas Mifflin as his aid and Joseph Reed as his secretary, General 
Lee and Samuel Griffin his aid, and General Schuyler. The party 
was accompanied out of town by all of the delegates in Congress 
from Massachusetts and many of the delegates from the other Col- 
onies, also by a troop of horse and many military officers and by 
bands of music. Before reaching Trenton they were met by a courier 
bearing dispatches for Congress with the news of the battle of 
Bunker Hill. On Saturday they were at New Brunswick. On Sun- 
day morning they were at Newark. Here they were met by Messrs. 
Richard Montgomery, John Sloss Hobart, Melancthon Smith and 
Gouverneur Morris, a committee appointed by the Provincial Congress 
of New York to attend Washington to the city. To avoid intercep- 
tion by British men-of-war lying in the bay, the party crossed the 
Hudson from Hoboken and landed near the foot of the present 
Laight street — a mile above the city. Here they were met by nine 
companies of militia and a large number of citizens. 

On Monday, June 26, at half past two in the afternoon, Washing- 
ton received an address from the Provincial Congress of New York, 
to which he replied, and left for Kingsbridge, where he spent the 
night. Here the troop of light horse which had accompanied him 
from Philadelphia left him and returned. Tuesday, the 27th, the 
party left Kingsbridge in company with General Schuyler for New 
Rochelle, where they met and held a conference with Major-General 
Wooster, who had recently been appointed to the command of the 
first Connecticut troops sent to New York. At New Rochelle Gen- 
eral Schuyler left to take command of the department of New York,. 
to which he had been appointed. 



* He was nominated by Thomas Johnson of Maryland. 



51 

Wednesday, the 28th, Washington arrived at New Haven and 
lodged at the tavern of Isaac Beers.* Early the next morning, June 
29th, he v^as again on his journey. He was attended by a number of 
the inhabitants of New Haven and escorted by two companies in 
uniform, and by one of students, which made a handsome appearance 
and whose drill gained the approbation of the generals. 

We now come to the question as to the route taken by Washington 
from New Haven. It has been claimed by our good Norwich friends 
that he went through that town. Let me quote from Miss Caulkins' 
History of Norwich: "General Washington passed through Nor- 
wich in June, 1775, on his way to Cambridge. It is probable that 
he came up the river in a packet boat with his horses and attendants. 
He spent the night at the Landing and the next day proceeded on 
his journey eastward." It is impossible to give authority for this 
scrap of history unless it is based upon the statement made by Elisha 
Ayers, a Preston schoolmaster, giving an account of an interview 
which he had with Washington at Mount Vernon in 1788, and quoted 
by Miss Caulkins, 

" The general was standing by his horse when I arrived, preparing 
to ride to another part of his estate. He inquired my name and 
what part of Connecticut I was from. I told him about seven miles 
east of Norwich City and near Preston village. ' I know where Nor- 
wich is,' he said. I told him I remembered the time when he and 
his aids staid a night in Norwich when he was on his way to the 
American army at Boston, and the next morning he went east to 
Preston village. 'At Preston village you were joined by Colonel 
Samuel Mott, a man who helped to conquer Canada from France, 
and there were two young recruiting captains for the Revolutionary 
War; one was Captain Nathan Peters, and the other was Captain 
Jeremiah Halsey; these went several miles with you on your journey 
to Boston.' The general said, ' I remember something about it.' I 
told him he went in sight of my father's house, two miles north of 
Preston village. ' Very likely,' he said, and asked me if I had been 
to breakfast." This surely was a very remarkable statement and 
Mr. Ayers' memory a most remarkable memory. I think our Nor- 
wich friends will have to revise their history. 

On the 1 6th of June, the day after the appointment of Washington, 
Silas Deane, then a delegate in Congress, wrote to Mrs. Deane at 
Wethersfield. " General Washington will be with you soon, elected 
to that high office by the unanimous voice of all America. I have 
been with him for the great part of the last forty-eight hours in Con- 
gress and committee, and the more I am acquainted with him, the 
more I esteem him. He promises me to call and if it happens favor- 



* Which stood near or on the site of the present New Haven House. 



52 ■ 

ably, to spend a night with you. I know you will receive him as 
my friend, and what is more — infinitely more — his country's friend, 
who, sacrificing private fortune, independent ease, and every domes- 
tic pleasure, sets off at his country's call to exert himself in her de- 
fense, without so much as returning to bid adieu to a fond partner 
and family. Let our youth look up to this man as a pattern to form 
themselves by, who unites the bravery of the soldier with the most 
consummate modesty and virtue." 

On the i8th, Mr. Deane again wrote to Mrs. Deane, " General 
Washington sets out on Thursday of this week. If he does, he will 
be in New York early on Saturday, where affairs will doubtless detain 
him until Monday or Tuesday, and in that case he will be with you 
on Frida}^ following. He is no lover of parade, so do not put ^'■our- 
self in distress. If it happens conveniently he will spend a night 
with you; if not, just call and go on. Should he spend a night, his 
retinue will doubtless, the chief of them, go on to Hartford." 

On the 22d, Mr. Deane wrote again to Mrs, Deane, •' This will be 
handed you by his Excellency General Washington in company with 
General Lee and retinue; should they lodge a night in Wethersfield, 
you will accommodate their horses, servants, etc., in the best manner 
at the tavern, and his retinue will likely go on to Hartford." 

Again on the 23d, Mr. Deane wrote: "I parted with General 
Washington yesterday about six miles from this city, and con- 
clude ere this time you will have had the pleasure of waiting on 
him." * 

I now return to Captain Wadsworth's diary. " Thursday, June 29, 
1775, Went to Glastonbury; found it difficult to get the flour ground 
for want of water. Found Cables in my debt. Returned to Wethers- 
field. General Washington and company there; dined at Mr. 
Deane's; brought General Lee in my carriage, and put my horse in 
General Washington's carriage to go to Windsor." From Wethers- 
field the first stop of the party was where we are now assembled. 
We may imagine how pleasant to the travellers on that summer 
afternoon one hundred and nineteen years ago was the shade of this 
now venerable tree; how pleasant it is to us to-day! We may imag- 
ine the welcome extended by the hospitable Wadsworth to his 
notable guests during the change of horses; the customary old-time 
refreshments of cake and wine tendered by the fair hands of Mrs. 
Wadsworth ; and we may be assured the customary bowl of punch was 
not wanting. The stay of the party here was brief and Washington 
was again on his way behind Wadsworth's horse. Let us accompany 
him on the rest of his way to camp. It has been stated, and is gen- 



*See correspondence of Silas Deane, Vol. II. Connecticut Historical Society Col- 
lections. 



53 

erally believed, that he made the entire journey from Philadelphia to 
Cambridge on horseback. We have evidence here that a part of it 
through Connecticut was made in a carriage.* Washington passed 
the night at Springfield, where he probably arrived late in the even- 
ing. He lodged at the tavern kept by Zenos Parsons near the corner 
of Main and Elm streets, where Court square is now. Early the 
next morning he took his departure from under the branches of an 
elm tree still standing. 

On the 26th of June, the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, 
then in session at Watertown, appointed Doctor Benjamin Church of 
Boston,! and Moses Gill of Princeton, both of them then members of 
that body, a committee "to repair to Springfield and receive Generals 
Washington and Lee with the mark of respect due to their exalted 
characters and stations." 

Early on the 30th, Washington left Springfield in company with 
the committee, and an escort of citizens went with him as far as 
Brookfield. His first stop was probably made at the tavern of Major 



* At Springfield other carriages were provided for him. 

Washington in his account of expenses, under date of June, 1775, makes an entry : 
"To the furnishing of five horses (two of which were had on a credit of Mr. James 
Mease), to equip me for my journey to the army at Cambridge, having sent my chariot 
and horses back to Virginia, ;^239." 

'' To a light phaeton bo't of Doct. Renaudet, ;^55." 

t Doctor Church had displayed the greatest zeal and ardor in the American cause. 
He was a friend of Warren, and like him had attained prominence as a physician. He 
was at this time surgeon-general of the army, as well as a member of the committee of 
safety and of the Provincial Congress. Within three months after his reception of Wash- 
ington at Springfield he was suspected of treason. He was arrested by General Putnam 
and brought before Washington, who charged him with baseness and ordered him to 
prison to await trial before a court composed of the general officers. His arrest and im- 
prisonment greatly excited the General Court then in session at Watertown. Major John 
Bliss, member from Wilbraham, and Mr. James Sullivan, member from Biddeford,$ were 
appointed a committee to wait on General Washington and request him to communicate 
the cause of his action. Doctor Church was brought before the bar of the House, which, 
as well as the court martial, found him guilty of criminal correspondence with. the enemy. 
He was expelled fromthe House and sentenced to prison for life. He was at first con- 
fined at Norwich, Connecticut, and deprived of the use of pen, ink and paper. In the 
latter part of May, 1776, he was sent to Watertown, Mass. Under the plea of ill health 
he was subsequently released and allowed to leave the country. He sailed for the West 
Indies on a vessel which was never heard from. 

Moses Gill was a member of the Provincial Congress from Princeton and one of the 
Council of Government. After the adoption of the Constitution of 1780, he was Lieutenant- 
Governor, and for awhile after the death of Governor Sumner was Governor of Massa- 
chusetts. 

The Provincial Congress had in July, by the advice of Congress, been reorganized, 
and was now assembled under the charter of 1662 as a Provincial Assembly. 

$ Major, afterwards Colonel Bliss, was great-grandfather of the writer. 

James Sullivan was brother of General John Sullivan. He was afterwards Governor 
of Massachusetts. 



54 . 

Graves.* where he probably breakfasted. At Brookfield he was 
met by a company from Worcester under the command of Captain 
Jerome Chadwick. From Worcester another company escorted the 
party to Marlborough; from thence a company of cavalry escorted 
them to Watertown, where they arrived on Sunday morning, July 2. 
The Provincial Congress on that day presented Washington and Lee 
with addresses, to which they replied on the 4th. Washington 
crossed Charles river to Cambridge to the quarters provided for him 
in the house occupied by the President of Harvard College. On 
Monday morning, July 3d, at nine o'clock, he took command of the 
army under the famous elm tree which has since borne his name. 
His reception was a quiet one, the great scarcity of powder prevent- 
ing the proper military salute. His arrival was announced to Gov- 
ernor Trumbull b}?- a committee f appointed by the Provincial Con- 
gress in the following words: "We have the pleasure to acquaint 
your Honor that Generals Washington and Lee, with Mr. Mifflin, 
aid de camp to General Washington, arrived at Cambridge last Sab- 
bath, in good health, a little after twelve o'clock at noon, and have 
good reason to expect, from their known characters and their vigil- 
ance already discovered, that their presence in the army will be 
attended with the most happy consequences." 

On the 29th of June, the day Washington was in Hartford, Com- 
missary Trumbull, then at Roxbury, wrote to Wadsworth, giving an 
account of the battle of Bunker Hill, and stating : " We expect Gen- 
erals Washington and Lee here by Sunday or Monday, or soon. I 
hope you will not fail to come with them, or soon after." Wads- 
worth, however, was too busy to leave his duties at the time, but on 
the [3th of July he left for the camp and returned on the 27th. What 
transpired during this period he does not record. 

To return to the diary: "Saturday, Oct. 28, 1775, settled some 
accounts. In the evening rec'd a letter from Jos. Trumbull, com. 
gen^, to go to Cambridge. Sunday, 29th, went to Lebanon. Monday, 
30th, set out for Cambridge. Tuesday, 31st, on the road. Wednes- 
day, November ist, arrived at Cambridge at 10 a. m. Waited on 
General Washington and am to call to-morrow morning. Spent this 
day seeing the stores and finding out chests. Went in the evening to 
Roxbury and returned. Wednesday, Nov. 2, reC^ a warrant for 120,- 
000 dollars. Presented it to Paymaster Warren; agreed to call in the 



* The tavern of Major Graves stood about one mile west of the present village of 
Palmer. The house has long since disappeared. Opposite was an elm tree. Here the 
people living in the neighborhood who had got the news of the expected passing of Wash- 
ington had gathered, and here tradition says Washington addressed them. The tree is 
still standing ; a large wide-spreading elm on the north side of the river, plainly to be 
seen by the traveler on the Boston and Albany R. R. 

+ President Warren, Major Handy and Captain Greenleaf. 



55 

morning. Dined G. W. " Thus Washington at Cambridge reciprocated 
the courtesies extended to him by Wadsworth at Hartford. I am 
impressed with the idea that in these brief interviews Washington , 
with his great insight into the characters of men, saw something of 
those qualities in Wadsworth which led him afterwards to draw him 
into closer and higher relations. From this visit to the camp Wads- 
worth set out on his return on the 4th of November, and arrived home 
on the 7th at g o'clock in the evening. 

I stop the further relation of Wadsworth's services as Deputy Com- 
missary to notice him in the sphere of other duties. In December he 
was appointed Commissary General of the State, to succeed Colonel 
Trumbull, who had been appointed Commissary General of Purchases 
of the United States. In March, 1777, he was appointed Deputy 
Quartermaster General of the United States, under General Mifflin, 
with the title of Colonel, and attached to the northern department of 
the army. This appointment took him away from his home the 
greater part of the time, during which he seems also to have dis- 
charged his duties as Commissary. In February, 1778, Congress, 
then in session at York, addressed a letter to the General Assembly 
of Connecticut requesting the attendance of Wadsworth on that body. 
No response to that letter being received, Congress again addressed 
the Assembly with the same request. The failure of the first request 
to reach the Assembly was due to the courier who brought it who was 
carrying dispatches to Boston. On his arrival at Ashford he discov- 
ered that he had failed to deliver the letter. Meeting with a man 
who was going to Hartford, he intrusted him with the letter, but he 
also failed to deliver it. 

In response to the letters to the General Assembly, Wadsworth 
repaired to Congress. The interview was doubtless in regard to the 
office of the Commissary General of Supplies, then vacant by reason, 
of the resignation of Colonel Trumbull. On the 3d of April, Wads- 
worth was appointed Commissary General, to which office there can 
hardly be a doubt his name had been suggested by Washington. He 
accepted the position with much reluctance and only on condition 
that the rules and regulations should be so changed as to give him the 
privilege of choosing his deputies and a greater control over them than 
had hitherto been permitted. Wadsworth was fully aware of the great 
trouble which Trumbull had experienced in the management of the 
affairs of the department by reason of his limited powers and the 
constant interference of Congress with them. General Greene had 
but a few days before been appointed Quartermaster General. The 
two officers were immediately thrown into close relations, the result 
of which was a strong and intimate friendship for life. Wadsworth's 
own position took him from home for greater distances and longer 
periods than ever. During his absence the care of his family and the 



56 

hospitalities of his home were left to Mrs. Wadsworth. She was a 
woman of cultivated mind; fond of books and literature; of domestic 
tastes; of accurate observation; of great equanimity of temper and 
discriminating judgment. She looked well to the ways of her house- 
hold, and during the absence of her husband managed all his affairs 
with great care, discretion and ability. 

It would be impossible to number the guests of this hospitable 
house during the period of the war, but here came the Trumbulls, 
the Williams's, the Huntingtons, the Lathrops, the Russells, theTal- 
cotts, the Webbs, the Hosmers, the Chesters, and many other promi- 
nent families of the State, while its doors were always open to the 
poor and needy. Here came prominent officers of the army. Here 
came Putnam on his last campaign, and here he was seized with the 
paralysis which compelled his retirement from the army.* Here 
came Greene and Huntington always in most friendly relation. Here 
came Rev. John Murray, the father of Universalism in this country; 
from here he writes to Colonel Wadsworth, then at headquarters: 
" I am sorry on not finding you at home. I have, however, found 
the best part of you. Your house abounds with excellent women, 
and I am indeed happy in Colonel Wadsworth's habitation." Here 
occurred that famous meeting of the officers of the allied armies of 
France and America in September, 1780. Here Washington, La Fay- 
ette, Knox and Hamilton met Rochambeau, Lauzun, and Admiral 
Ternay. With Rochambeau were his aids, de Damas, and the brilliant 
young Swede, de Fersen, then little dreaming of his horrible fate. 

Chastellux, in his accounts of his first journey in North America, 
says that on his arrival in Hartford in November, 1780, he found a 
convention of delegates of the New England States in session, and 
the inns so full that it was difficult to procure a lodging; but Colonel 
Wadsworth here offered him a most agreeable as^dum and that he 
and the Duke de Lauzun both lodged with him."f 

Whether Rochambeau and Chastellux were here at the time of 
the celebrated military conference with Washington and Knox at 
Wethersfield in May, 1781, I do not know with certainty; it is, how- 
ever, improbable that Wadsworth, who was also at the conference, 
would have allowed any of the members to have passed through 



* "General Putnam arrived at your house last Fryday morning; was seized immediately 
alter his arrival with a fit of the palsy; his first complaint was a numbness of three of his 
fingers of his right hand. In the spa.ce of an hour it reaches up to his shoulders. In the 
afternoon his right foot and leg was affected and he was obliged to be carried up to his 
chamber by two men." 

John Jeffrey, to Colonel Wadsworth, Dec. 29, 1779. 

"General Putnam is at your house. God knows when he will go thence. He was 
seized with a fit of the palsy and carried in there. I fear he has made his last campaign." 

Peter Colt, to Colonel Wadsworth, Dec. 27, 1779. 

t Voyages, Vol. I, page 27. 



57 

Hartford without showing; his hospitality. Certain it is, Rochambeau, 
Chastellux and other officers of the French army were entertained 
here while on the march of the army from Newport in the following 
month. "We have had," writes Mrs. Wadsworth on June 26, to her 
children, Harriet and Daniel, then at school in Boston, "the General 
Rochambeau and his family at our house, and a number more of the 
gentlemen of the army as they pass. I expect the last of them to 
pass next Monday." And little " Kitty " Wadsworth sent them word 
that she had " been up two or three mornings going by five o'clock, 
to see the French troops march and to hear the sweet music." 

Blanchard, commissary of the French army, in his account of the 
campaign says: "On the i8th of June I arrived in Hartford, and 
dined with Colonel Wadsworth, furnisher of our army, whom I had 
known in Newport. He has a pretty house, very well furnished. 
He presented me to Governor Trumbull." 

The campaign planned at Wethersfield is open. The French 
troops are on the march to Virginia; Wadsworth is with them. The 
siege of Yorktown is begun, and Cornwallis surrenders. A period of 
inactivity sets in; there are rumors of peace. The winter passes 
away. In June the French troops begin their march northward. In 
September and October they are encamped on the banks of the 
Hudson. Again they pass through Connecticut, the greater part of 
them. Again Rochambeau is the guest of Wadsworth. "General 
Rochambeau will dine with you to-morrow," writes de Fersen from 
Farmington one October day. The troops embark at Boston. 
Rochambeau has turned the command of them over to Viomenil and 
returned to the headquarters of Washington, stopping, in all proba- 
bility, to accept the hospitality of Wadsworth once more, and soon, 
with Lauzun and the remaining troops, to leave the Capes of the 
Delaware for France. 

With the spring comes the assured news of the long reported 
peace. France is largely indebted to Wadsworth for his services. 
In July he sails for France for the settlement of his claim. There he 
renews his acquaintance with La Fayette, Rochambeau, Villemanzy 
and others, and forms new ones, and accepts their hospitality. He 
went to Passy and dined with Jay and Franklin. In June he wrote to 
Peter Colt, the manager of his affairs at home, that La Fayette was 
coming to America, and that though the war was over, we were 
under a thousand new obligations to him since peace was declared;, 
that his whole time was employed about our commerce and our 
country, that he had already obtained advantages for us, which but 
for him would never have been obtained, and begged that his recep- 
tion might be as brilliant as possible, not only at Hartford, but 
throughout the State of Connecticut, " See to this yourself," he adds 
in conclusion. 



58 

In Ma5^ 1784, La Fayette wrote to Washington that before the end 
of June he would arrive in the Potomac; would be at Mount Vernon 
and have the pleasure of taking a cup of tea with Mrs. Washington. 
His intended voyage was probably delayed. He arrived at New 
York, August 4, in the packet " Le Courier," Captain Joubert, and 
at Mount Vernon on the 19th, where he spent twelve days and left 
for the north. He arrived at Albany, and was at Fort Schuyler on 
the 3d of October, when he attended a treaty with the Indians. On 
Monday, the nth, he arrived in Hartford. He was escorted into 
town by a number of reputable citizens, and his arrival announced 
by a volley of artillery. On Tuesday he dined at Bull's tavern with 
the city officers and a number of other gentlemen. On Wednesday 
he left for Boston. It is doubtful if on the occasion of this brief visit 
he was a guest in the home of Wadsworth, yet it can hardly be 
doubted that he paid a visit to the house whose hospitality he had 
previously enjoyed. Possibly Wadsworth had not returned from 
Europe. If he had not, he was homeward bound and nearing the land. 

On the 19th, La Fayette was at Boston. It was the anniversary of 
the surrender of Cornwallis. A great dinner was given him on the 
occasion. After visiting Portsmouth and other eastern towns, he in 
November started for Virginia, on his way to Mount Vernon, to pay 
his final visit to Washington. Once more he was at Yorktown. He 
visited Williamsburg and Richmond; at Mount Vernon he spent a 
week. He then left for New York. Washington went with him to 
Annapolis, and then he bade him his last farewell. On Christmas 
day he sailed for France in "La Nymphe," a frigate of the King. He 
had been received with the greatest enthusiasm throughout his tour. 

Under the date of November 8th, Samuel Breck, a Boston corre- 
spondent of Colonel Wadsworth, wrote him : "I flatter myself that 
yoii will allow the strict attention I have paid to the contents of your 
obliging favor of the 13th inst. to plead my apology for not answer- 
ing it sooner. Almost every moment of my time, except what was 
employed in public business, has been devoted to the services of our 
mutual friend, the Marquis de LaFayette. His reception has un- 
doubtedly been announced to you by the Gazette, but the attention 
paid to him to the eastward has, if possible, surpassed ours. I had 
the honor to accom^pany the Marquis to Portsmouth and the gratifica- 
tion to see the people of all ranks and ages pressing from every 
quarter and contending for the happiness of first embracing this 
gallant foreigner. It would, indeed, be impossible for me to describe 
the joy that universally prevailed on this occasion. Through every 
seaport, and even village, the Marquis was received by the principal 
inhabitants, who on horseback or in carriages escorted him from the 
entrance to the limits of their town. Public dinners, balls, firing of 
cannon and ringing of bells proclaimed everywhere the happy arrival 
of the man to whom America, except Washington, was most indebted. 



59 

The manner in which he has received the flattering enconiums of 
freemen has endeared him. if possible, more than ever to Americans 
and has effectually riveted in each heart the chain of most sincere 
affection. On Friday last he embarked on the Nj-mphe frigate for 
Virginia, where, as the wind has continued fair, he has now possibly 
arrived. I inclose a packet from the Marquis, which he has directed 
me to send to you." 

More than a year had gone by since Wadsworth's departure for 
Europe. Now he was home again, soon he represents Hartford in 
the General Assembly; then he is sent to the Continental Congress. 
The friendships formed in war and abroad and in the social life of 
Philadelphia and New York bring other guests to Wadsworth's home. 
Here came the Schuylers from Albany, the Talmadges from Litch- 
field. Here came the Hon. John Hancock with Mrs. Hancock, the 
brilliant Rufus King with his handsome wife, nee Alsop. Here came 
that portly couple, General and Mrs. Henry Knox and General 
Greene and Mrs. Greene, Every traveler of note from abroad or 
distant part of the land came here with letters commending them to 
Wadsworth's hospitality. I cannot now recite more of these occasions. 

The old mansion like others had its joys and sorrows. Here its 
builder brought his bride; here all their children were born and here 
all the family, with one exception, died. Here in the midst of the 
war the youngest child of Wadsworth was born and named for him ; 
born to gladden the parental hearts for one short year and then to 
die; born and buried while the father was away with the army. 

The years pass away and another generation comes as they go. 
The house is filled with the youth and beauty of Hartford — a wide 
circle — soon to be broken by the illness of Harriet, the oldest daugh- 
ter of Colonel Wadsworth, a girl of sweetest character, the admiration 
and idol of all who knew her. Seized with consumption she sought 
in the autumn of 1 792 a restoration of health in the milder climate of 
the Bermudas; but after a long and trying illness, during which her 
patience, fortitude and composure excited the admiration of all around 
her, before the return of spring to her native home she yielded up 
her sweet spirit and found a grave in the coral soil of St. George. 

Bright skies of joy succeed the clouds of grief. In the summer of 
1794 Faith, the eldest daughter of the second Jonathan Trumbull, is 
welcomed as the bride of the only son, to repair with sincere love 
and affection the bitter loss. Soon, too, the marriage bells rang at 
the wedding of Catherine, the remaining daughter, to Nathaniel 
Terry, and again the mansion rings with the voices and mirth of 
children and grandchildren, who are to be the heirs of the Wads- 
worth estate. 

In 1797 Colonel Wadsworth quit-claimed his interest in the western 
half of this property to his two maiden sisters in exchange for the 
eastern part of it, where in 1798 he built a house for his son, Daniel 



6o 

Wadsworth, the house now occupied by the Hartford Club. Subse- 
quently he built for his daughter, Mrs. Terry, the house south of it, 
now occupied by the Dunham family. 

I had not proposed to give any eulogy of Wadsworth on this occa- 
sion. I must, however, briefly state what has been said of him by 
those who knew him. In all the relations of life, private and public, 
he was highly esteemed and respected. Among family and friends 
he was affectionate and beloved. He was kind and benevolent; 
always the protector of the widow and fatherless and the helper 
of the distressed. As a citizen he was faithful and reliable. His- 
patriotism was true and sincere, and no stain has ever rested upon 
him in the discharge of his public duties. 

Colonel Wadsworth engaged in every branch of industry con- 
ducive to public welfare, in agriculture, commerce and manufactures. 
In agriculture he adopted the most improved methods; in commerce 
his ships traveled to Europe, to the West Indies and the southern 
coast. He established with his own and the capital of others the first 
broadcloth manufactory in the United States. He aided with his 
means others in like enterprises. 

He was continuously called into public life, in the Comm.on 
Council of the city, in the Legislature. Five years he represented 
the town; six years he was in the House of Assistants. In the three 
closing years of the old Continental Congress he represented the 
State. He was a delegate to the convention called to ratify the Con- 
stitution of the United States. He was heartily in favor of that great 
instrument, and his influence, with that of Ellsworth, Sherman, and 
others, gave it an overwhelming majority over the votes of some of 
the most sincere men in the State. After the organization of the new 
government he was for three sessions a representative in Congress, 
and then declined a re-election. 

He was a strong supporter of Washington and his administration. 
He was in the most intimate relations with Alexander Hamilton, and 
it is my firm belief that the latter, in formulating plans for the regu- 
lating of the commercial and financial measures of the government, 
great and marvelous as was his own genius, he yet had material aid 
from Wadsworth. Indeed, I know that Hamilton requested informa- 
tion from him in certain matters. Wadsworth had not much skill for 
debate; what he had to say was brief and pointed. His resources 
were the result of inquiry, observation and experience. He was 
candid. He said he trifled with no one. 

Wadsworth died April 30, 1804, at the age of sixty-one. His death 
was followed in July by that of his friend Hamilton. Mrs. Wads- 
worth survived her husband thirteen years and died in 18 17. 
Whether she spent her widowhood in the old mansion or with her 
son or daughter, I am not informed. 



6i 

By the death of Miss Eunice Wadsworth, in 1825, the property 
passed by will to Daniel Wadsworth, who then became possessor of 
ancestral property from both sides of his house; the lot having been 
part of the original house lot of Elder William Goodwin, one of the 
early settlers of Hartford, from whom Mr. Wadsworth was descended. 

The house was somewhat changed by alterations and additions for 
the accommodation of more than one family. It still, however, 
retained many of its original features. 

In 1841 Daniel Wadsworth, to forward a plan for an art gallery and 
the library of the Young Men's Institute — now the Hartford Library, 
the Connecticut Historical Society and the Society of Natural His- 
tory — gave the land and subscribed liberally in money toward the 
erection of the fine building beside us. The old mansion was 
removed to Buckingham street, where it stood until taken down a 
few years since. 

It is much to be regretted that the period of historical sentiment in 
Hartford has been so far behind that of other places, else some effort 
might have been made to restore the house and preserve it for public 
or historical uses. 

I need hardly refer to the magnificent gifts made in the past few 
years by the Morgans, the Goodwins, the Keneys, and Roland Mather, 
those generous sons of Hartford, supplemented by popular subscrip- 
tion, which has resulted in the extension of the plan of Mr. Daniel 
Wadsworth and a more perpetual monument to art, literature, history, 
and the name of Wadsworth. 

Although the noise of the street prevented a large 
part of the audience from hearing, those in the speaker's 
immediate vicinity paid the closest attention to his valu- 
able contribution, derived for the most part from unpub- 
lished sources, to the local history of the period of the 
revolution. 

Mr. Joseph Gurley Woodward, representing the tablet 

committee, introduced Miss Brinley of Newington as 

follows: 

MR. WOODWARD'S REMARKS. 

Representing the committee charged with the preparation of the 
tablet this day set up, it is my duty to say, in spite of his positive 
prohibition of the mention of his name, that it was designed by Mr. 
Everett Edward Lord of New Haven, a member of the committee, 
and moulded by his hands. To him all credit for its production is 
due. May storm and frost and the years deal tenderly with this ven- 
erable tree and preserve it and the legend which it bears — a reminder 
6 



62 

from generation to generation of the men who established the nation 
and by whose spirit it must be preserved. 

Mr. President, standing within the limits of the town of Hartford, 
no name has equal right to reverence with that of the preacher and 
statesman, the chief of the founders of the town, and the constitution 
maker of America — Thomas Hooker. 

The highest virtue of the soldier is courage, and that virtue has 
never been more perfectly embodied than in the Windham county 
farmer who at the first note of the Lexington alarm left his furrow 
and became at last the senior major-general of the armies of the 
United States— Israel Putnam. 

We have heard in the paper of Mr. Morris of the claims to grateful 
remembrance of one whom we especially honor to-day and who was 
from the beginning of the revolution until his death easily the fore- 
most citizen of the town — Jeremiah Wadsworth. 

All these illustrious men, and many others conspicuous in the early 
history of this commonwealth, are lineally represented in the gracious 
young gentlewoman whom I now have the honor to present, Miss 
Frances Ellen Brinley of this county, who will unveil the tablet. 

THE UNVEILING. 

Miss Brinley, dressed in white, stepped upon a gnarled 
root of the tree and, as she pulled a cord, the flag 
whicli covered the tablet dropped, amid the applause of 
the spectators. The tablet is a bronze shield, having a 
representation of the Wadsworth elm, the seal of the 
Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Rev- 
olution, and this inscription: 

WADSWORTH ELM. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON, 

DURING HIS FIRST VISIT TO 

CONNECTICUT, JUNE 29, 1775, 

WHILE ON HIS WAY TO TAKE COMMAND OF 

THE ARMY AT CAMBRIDGE, 

WAS HERE ENTERTAINED BY CAPTAIN JEREMIAH WADSWORTH. 



TO RECORD THE EVENT AND HONOR HIS MEMORY 

THE CONNECTICUT SOCIETY OF SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

HAVE PLACED THIS TABLET. 

1894. 



63 

At the close of the out-of-door ceremonies, Ruth Wyllys 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, gave a 
reception and tea to the Sons of the American Revolution 
in the Atheneum, Mrs. John M. Holcombe, the Regent, 
assisted by the other officers, receiving in the Art Gal- 
lery. Tea was served in the upper lobby and in the Art 
Society's room, Mrs. Ellen Terry Johnson, a great-grand- 
daughter of Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth, Mrs. Frances 
C. Palmer and Mrs. Francis Goodwin, pouring, and Miss 
Mary Shipman and Miss Mabel Wainwright officiating 
at the frappe table. 

In the rooms of the Connecticut Historical Society 
was displayed a collection of Wadsworth memorials, in- 
cluding letters from Washington, La Fayette, Rocham- 
beau. General Putnam, and other revolutionary worthies, 
and the court suit Colonel Wadsworth wore when in 
France. 

THE NORWICH DINNER. 

The sixth celebration of Washington's birthday by 
this society was held at Norwich, February 22, 1895. 
The members of the Israel Putnam Branch were the 
hosts of the occasion. Its officers are Doctor Robert 
Porter Keep, President; Captain L. A. Gallup, Vice 
President; Ansel Earle Beckwith, Secretary; Charles E. 
Chandler, Historian; Reverend Richard Henry Nelson, 
Chaplain. 

During the morning the guests enjoyed the hospital- 
ity of the Arcanum Club and had an opportunity to 
visit a special exhibit of paintings and colonial and 
revolutioriary relics at the Slater museum. In the ex- 
hibit were included portraits by John Trumbull and 
Major Andre's well-known letter to Washington. The 
dinner was served in Lucas Hall, handsomely decorated 
under the supervision of a committee of which Mr. 
William Marvin Alcott was chairman, at 1.30 p. m. 
About two hundred guests were present. Grace was 
said by the Chaplain, the Reverend Edwin S. Lines. 



64 
t^c (gtenu. 



BLUE POINT OYSTERS. 

RADISHES. BOUILLON. OLIVES. 

BOILED KENNEBEC RIVER SALMON, EGG SAUCE. 

NEW TOMATOES. CELERY. 

ROAST TURKEY. FILLETS OF BEEF. 

RICE CROQUETTES. POTATOES. 

CRANBERRY MARMALADE. PEAS. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

ROMAN PUNCH. CIGARETTES. 

FRUIT. CAKE. CONFECTIONS. 

NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAM. 

COFFEE. CRACKERS AND CHEESE. CIGARS. 

While the dinner was in progress a delegation from 
the Daughters of the American Revolution appeared in 
the gallery. They were greeted with hearty cheers. 

At 4 p. m., President Trumbull called the assemblage 
to order, saying : Gentlemen, before proceeding with 
the regular list of toasts, there is a gentleman present 
who would like to give us a toast which is not down 
upon the list. 

MR. DASKAM. 

I give you the toast, "The Daughters of the Revolution." If there 
had not been any daughters, there would not have been any sons. 

This was responded to with three lusty cheers and 
a tiger. 

Mr. Trumbull: Sons and Daughters of the American 
Revolution : For the sixth time in its history this 
society has met to honor the birthright which has been 
transmitted to each one of us through those ancestors 
who have toiled and fought that we might be free; and 
particularly to honor the great commander of the Revo- 



65 

lution whose birthday we celebrate. The sources of in- 
spiration at such a time are so numerous and so unfail- 
ing that I know that patriotic utterances are waiting 
upon the lips of every son and of every daughter of the 
American Revolution before me. (Applause.) 

T find my position somewhat embarrassing from the 
fact that I cannot call upon each of you to give voice to 
your particular revolutionary sentiment. This embar- 
rassment is, however, to a great extent compensated by 
the fact that in looking upon our programme — both our 
printed and unprinted programme — I find the names of 
so many distinguished men whose response to our invi- 
tation to become the spokesmen of our society is such 
a gratification to us to-day. My own words of welcome 
to you are of a personal rather than of an official char- 
acter, and have been already expressed to most of you 
in that informal, hand-to-hand manner which our social 
gatherings have afforded. Once more, I extend to you 
the same greeting, knowing, as we do, its full signifi- 
cance among men and women of that ancestry which is 
our glorious heritage. The Israel Putnam Branch of 
this Society of the Sons of the American Revolution is, 
properly speaking, your host on this occasion. Its words 
of welcome and greeting will now be extended to you 
by its President, Dr. Robert P. Keep of Norwich. (Great 
applause.) 

DR. KEEP. 

Mr. President, Friends of the State Society, our Sisters, the 
Daughters of the Revolution, and our Guests who are invited on this 
occasion : There has been laid before me the pleasant and honor- 
able duty of extending a welcome in behalf of our local society, our 
local branch of the Sons of the American Revolution. This branch 
has been in existence somewhat less than a year and numbers about 
fifty members. Thus far a considerable part of its activity has con- 
sisted in the pleasant task of making arrangements for this first 
gathering of the State Society in Norwich. There are in the State 
of Connecticut, at the present time, outside of our own branch, if I 
am correctly informed, four local societies, viz. , Bridgeport, Norwalk, 
New Haven, and Meriden. At Hartford, where the State Society 



66 

seems to have taken its birth, it was probably thought unnecessary 
to organize a local branch, because the feeling may have been that 
Hartford was really the State Society after all. Certainly we are 
willing to leave to Hartford the honors of pioneership of possession, 
and certainly Norwich would never quarrel with Hartford, as the 
two cities have been so closely and so amicably connected, for prior- 
ity or for any other honorable privilege. 

There could be no question as to what the name of our local society 
in Norwich should be. We are well aware that we are not as highly 
favored in eastern Connecticut in natural advantages as some other 
parts of our commonwealth. We don't live in the glorious valley of 
the Connecticut River; we haven't the grandeurs of Litchfield 
county; but eastern Connecticut has not failed in producing its quota 
of men who are worthy to be leaders in our commonwealth. Nor- 
wich herself has given birth to two college presidents, President 
Dwight of Yale, and President Oilman of Johns Hopkins University. 
(Prolonged cheers and cries of " Yale.") 

The little town of Scotland, close by Norwich, gave birth to Prof. 
J. L. Kingsley, who did much to form the classical scholarship of 
Yale, and gave inspiration to men like Thatcher and Hadley and 
those who follow him. From the town of Pomfret, within easy reach 
of the place where we are now assembled, there went to the revolu- 
tion, Israel Putnam. (Great applause.) 

Let us bring up before our mind's eye the picture of this already 
venerable man (for Putnam was nearly sixty years old when the 
revolution broke out): he was ploughing in the fields of his farm, 
which he had acquired three years before, and when the news of the 
conflict at Lexington and Concord was brought to him, let us see him 
as he turns his cattle loose, mounts his horse, and starts for Boston, 
riding, as the story goes, the distance of seventy-eight miles in 
eighteen hours, with no halt; back again in Connecticut within a 
week, organizing a regiment, proceeding with that regiment to Bun- 
ker Hill, of which battle he became, perhaps, the real hero. (More 
applause.) There could be no question, I say, as to what the name 
of the first branch of our State Society to be formed in eastern 
Connecticut should be — the Israel Putnam Branch. 

Brothers of the State Society, as I welcome you, there comes before 
me a list of the towns of old Connecticut — of pre-revolutionary Con- 
necticut—of a score of towns and of the historical names of our 
state, and I think that you remember those names and represent 
those towns. In a hundred years what changes have come upon the 
state! how it has changed from a farming community to a manufac- 
turing state! and what an interesting thing for the historian and the 
man of an historical imagination to recall, as he runs over the names 
of our membership, the old commonwealth of the revolutionary days ! 



67 

I love the State of Connecticut as I love no other spot on earth, and 
I believe that the love of state is as strong in Connecticut as in any- 
state in our union ; but the glory of Connecticut has always been 
that in love for our native state, we lose nothing of devotion to the 
union. How well that was shown in the revolutionary war and 
how well it was shown in the second war maintained by the repub- 
lic! I believe there are qualities in the genuine natives of Con- 
necticut that make a reunion of Connecticut men one of the most 
joyful and most agreeable that can possibly take place. Connecti- 
cut people are probably not as brilliant as our brothers across 
the Massachusetts border, but we are no less dogged in our attach- 
ment to the cause that we adopt; we are no less faithful to the friends 
and the friendships that we form. Caution, intelligence, steadiness, 
and firmness are the. Connecticut qualities that were shown in the 
revolution and that have been shown ever since, and it is a matter 
of honorable pride for us to remember that of the sixty- six half- 
barrels of gunpowder that made up the scanty ammunition of our 
fathers' forces on Bunker Hill, thirty- three were a gift from the state 
of Connecticut. (Prolonged applause.) 

I also have the pleasure and privilege of extending a most cordial 
welcome to our sisters who are here present from the various socie- 
ties of the Daughters of the Revolution. (Applause and cheers.) 
As has been said, what were the fathers of the revolution without 
the mothers, and what are the Sons of the Revolution without the 
Daughters ? I believe, gentlemen, that the prosperity of our State 
Society will not be maintained alone by meeting once a year to eat a 
dinner together; I believe that the sentiments on which we are to 
depend for the value of our State organization will depend upon our 
cultivating an intelligent knowledge of the period in which our an- 
cestors gained their glory, in the study of the times with which we 
are connected, and I might say in regard to the Faith Trumbull 
Chapter of the Daughters of the Revolution of Norwich, that the 
ladies have shown by the vigor with which they have carried on their 
meetings, by the papers that have been prepared, by the solid work 
that they have done, and by their rapid increase, what the local 
branch of the Sons should emulate. (More applause.) 

It would be pleasant for me to mention in detail others of our 
invited guests, but I must limit myself to the mention of a few only. 
I had hoped that the Governor of our State would be with us, and in 
his absence we had anticipated the presence of Lieutenant-Governor 
Cooke of Barkhamsted; but he is unavoidably detained. We desire 
that our gatherings may also be graced by the presence of our Chief 
Magistrate. 

Closely connected as Connecticut is with Yale College, it would be 
indeed a matter of regret to us if some representative of the college 



were not with us at each of our gatherings. There arises before me, 
as I think of old Connecticut, a picture of the long line of Connecticut 
ministers who founded Yale College, and who selected from the far- 
mer parishes of which they were the ministers the bright boys and 
sent them on their way to New Haven, that there they might be 
trained to be the leaders of thought: to be the ministers, doctors, law- 
yers and educated men of the next generation; and I think of the 
days in the past that have bound our commonwealth to Yale College, 
and I think of what a part Yale College has played in forming and 
conserving that type of educated character which we wish Connecti- 
cut men to represent; and so I rejoice in the privilege of welcoming 
in your behalf the president of Yale University, Timothy Dwight, a 
native of Norwich. (Great applause and cries of " Three cheers for 
Yale.") It would give me great pleasure to mention by name others 
of those who are gathered here and from whom we are to hear to-day 
— all of them sons of Connecticut who have given evidence of the 
Connecticut qualities that win respect and gain influence in our com- 
monwealth and in our union; but, gentlemen, they will speak for 
themselves. In behalf, then, of our local society, in behalf of our 
town, in behalf of us all, I extend to you the heartiest welcome. 
(Great applause.) 

Mr. Trumbull : It is with the utmost gratification 
that we find our board honored to-day by the presence 
of a distinguished son of Norwich and Son of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, whose long and honorable career on the 
bench of the United States Courts has made his name so 
familiar to you all, that simply to mention him is the 
most fitting introduction I can utter. His Revolution- 
ary ancestors have honored Connecticut history by their 
warm-hearted, patriotic prayers from the pulpit, their 
fidelity, their distinguished service in the field — how 
little appreciated ! — and their still more distinguished 
and brilliant service at Bunker Hill and Stony Point, so 
familiar to you all. We of Norwich are particularly 
proud that he has selected our town as the subject upon 
which he is to speak to-day, for on this, as on every 
other occasion which comes before him, he is sure to do 
the subject justice. "The Old Town of Norwich" will 
now receive justice at the hands of His Honor, Judge 
Nathaniel Shipman. (Great applause.) 



69 

JUDGE SHIPMAN. 

Mr. President, Ladies and Fellow Citizens : The president has 
promised a great deal more than I can perform. No living man can 
do justice to the town of Norwich (great applause); few living men 
will ever undertake it, and if they do, they will be apt to fail. My 
business and my part to-day will be a far more simple and unpreten- 
tious one than to attempt to go over the honored and the honorable 
history of the town; and indeed, it is not necessary, for the exhaustive 
history of Miss Caulkins and the elaborate historical oration of Presi- 
dent Oilman in 1859 at the semi-centennial has made research into 
the history of the town somewhat superfluous. If we want to go into 
the region of sentiment, Mr. Donald G. Mitchell's most felicitous and 
graceful essay at the same semi-centennial celebration has made it 
inexpedient for the rest of us, although having like appreciation of 
the history of the town and like admiration for it, to attempt to do 
anything more than simply to say we loved the town when we were 
boys, we love it now when we are men, and we want to say so. 
(Great applause, long continued.) 

I have felt since I came here that it is somewhat difficult for a 
stranger who lived in the town as a boy during the 30's, and who 
went away then, no more to make it his home here, to place himself 
in touch with you who have always lived here. Our memories are 
those of the then existing old men and natives of the town. They 
stand out distinct and separate photographs; they are to you only 
shadows; and if I should talk to-day of the men who were my heroes 
in boyhood, whose faces I scarcely dared to look upon, and from 
whose presence I was apt to flee away — such men as old Gen. 
Zachariah Huntington and Judge Jabez Huntington and Judge God- 
dard, and men of that stamp — why, there is nobody here who would 
recollect them except Colonel Wait and Colonel Converse; so, gentle- 
men, I must pass that by. But there is one idea and one sentiment 
upon which all children of Norwich can unite, and in which and for 
which we have a comprehensive and all-abiding insight, and that is, 
love for the scenery and beauty of the town. Now, gentlemen, take 
it all in all, the whole landscape of this town, the two rivers, the 
Shetucket and Yantic, coming together and encircling the cliffs 
which rise up before the Thames, and the cliffs rising one after 
another until they form the rocky spine which we boys used to call 
Savin Hill, and where we used to play Saturday afternoons, and 
which separates the two beautiful streets, Broadway and Washing- 
ton street, and afterwards uniting in the plain which sweeps from 
the foot of the rocky hill where the Mitchell boys used to live, and 
where Judge Foster's house afterwards was, to the rocky gorge of 
the Yantic Falls — this combination of rivers, coves, gorges, falls 



7° 

rocks and cliffs — rocks with narrow streets or no streets sloping down 
into the grassy plain — with wide streets and smooth, handsome 
lawns, all make a panorama which constitutes the loveliest spot in all 
New England and one of the loveliest spots from Maine to California. 

Just after Fort Sumter was fired upon, I came here to see Governor 
Buckingham ; and now I want to diverge a minute and tell you that 
the other night I was in the city of New York at an elaborate and 
sumptuous dinner, and I was seated side by side with a Norwich con- 
temporary. Well, our talk naturally fell upon the town of Norwich 
and its history; he went on to tell his reminiscences and I told mine, 
and finally he stopped and said he: "I suppose that Governor Buck- 
ingham during the eight years of his administration probably made 
some mistakes; but I tell you, Nat, that from Jonathan Trumbull 
down, he was the biggest man of them all." (Great applause, long 
continued.) Now, I put it to you all, after thirty years have passed 
since the years of enthusiasm and excitement, which sometimes 
caused the judgment to waver, is not our calm and deliberate judg- 
ment, when we weigh men for what they did and for what they 
achieved, in accord, that no man could have carried the State of 
Connecticut through eight years to its highest, unwavering point of 
patriotic devotion to country, as did the coolness and self-sacrifice 
and the unquenchable heroism of Governor Buckingham ? (Great ap- 
plause.) 

Now I come back again. The moment that I got into the street, 
when I came here to see Governor Buckingham, I found the town in 
a blaze. The ladies had spent the previous Sunday in Breed's Hall, 
in fitting out Captain Chester's company for the front. That com- 
pany had just left, the Governor walking side by side with the 
Captain to the station, and the company cheered on its way with the 
enthusiasm of the multitude who stood by. Two other companies — 
one Colonel Crosby's and the other General Harland's — were being 
enlisted at the time; money was being raised without stint, and the 
town was at a white heat. That afternoon I went up to the old Court 
House on the hill, and there was Judge Butler trying a will case from 
Poquetannock. The court room was still and the few men that were 
in it were quiet; Judge Butler's bloodless face looked as if it had been 
carved out of granite, and the whole scene proclaimed that obedience 
to law and the supremacy of justice ruled the hour. I suppose that 
Dr. Keep actually remembers and I suppose that Dr. Dwight 
supposes he remembers the entire Dialogues of Plato; and in 
one of these dialogues they may both remember the conversation 
between Socrates and his friend, in which Socrates refuses to seek 
flight from anticipated death because and on account of obedience to 
law, and he said that there was murmuring in his ear the whole time 
the words " Obedience to law." On that afternoon in that still court 
room, Socrates would have found the place and Judge Butler most 



71 

congenial society. (Great applause.) Well, as I went down the hill^ 
I thought to myself, these two scenes that I have witnessed to-day 
are a type of the town of Norwich; they are significant of the two 
characteristics of the town from the time Major Mason came here 
with the company from Saybrook in 1659 to the present hour; and 
these are, fervent, earnest, gushing patriotism at the bottom, and 
obedience to law on top. And, gentlemen, permit me to say (and 
that is the thing I came to-day to say) that subsequent reflection has 
only convinced me that the characteristics which most prominently 
mark the town of Norwich are earnest, impulsive, quickly responsive 
and fervent patriotism, restrained by devotion to truth and by a sense 
of the supremacy of justice. 

Now, let us look back a little; let us look back, not a great while in 
the memory of Colonel Wait, to revolutionary times. 1 think we 
shall all admit that Gen. Jabez Huntington and his four sons, who 
afterwards each one of them obtained rank in the army in one de- 
partment or another, during the entire period of the revolutionary 
war were the military leaders of the town of Norwich. General 
Jabez was a man of considerable fortune — of large fortune for 
those days — a part of which he had acquired by mercantile pur- 
suits. At the outbreak or just before the war, Dr. Gilman told 
us in his Historical Address, when war was imminent, the gen- 
eral assembled together his wife, his five sons, and his two 
daughters, for counsel and advice. Of course he had pretty good 
reason to know what they would advise; but he assembled them 
together for advice, and Dr. Gilman tells how he put before 
them that if he entered upon war actively his property would 
be diminished, if not completely sacrificed. If the colonies suc- 
ceeded, his property would be in part gone, but liberty would re- 
main; if the colonies did not succeed, they would have the odium 
which attached to unsuccessful rebellion and their property would 
be gone. And now he submitted to them, ' ' What shall I and what 
will you do ? " and the eight of them, wife, five sons, and two daugh- 
ters, unanimously resolved to advise him to go for liberty. (Great 
applause, long continued.) Well, now, there were the two types of 
which I have spoken; the old gentleman was eager to sacrifice his 
property; he wanted to; but justice told him that those people who 
stood before him had equitable claims on him for support; he had 
educated each one of them to believe that a competent inheritance 
would be theirs in the future; and he thought it was but just to sub- 
mit the question to them of property or no property ; and as they de- 
termined, so would he decide. 

One thing more. In looking back at those particular revolution- 
ary heroes, who were the sons of Deacon Simon Huntington, one of 
the founders of the town, I suppose no greater aristocrats ever lived 
during the reign of any one of the four Georges than were those 



72 . 

same gentlemen. (Great laughter.) The idea of fraternity did not 
enter into their minds. They were animated by a desire for justice, 
to obtain justice from England and liberty for the colonies,— in 
justice and liberty— no equality and fraternity business about it; and 
they were willing to sacrifice their property and risk their lives. So, 
gentlemen, the town of Norwich has gone on: in every field where 
patriotism and devotion to liberty were to be found, there the sons of 
Norwich have gone. They have gone into far distant fields; and 
some of them, both men and women, have in these fields found 
heroic deaths. Mr. Donald G. Mitchell, at the close of his address of 
which I have already spoken, at the semi-centennial in 1859, exhorted 
the people of Norwich to be true to their history and never to fail. 
That, mind you, was in 1859. Mr. Mitchell did not then know and 
nobody then knew that in 1861 the town would be called upon to test 
its devotion to country and its devotion to justice also. Gentlemen, 
I need not tell you in what a magnificent way and with what magnifi- 
cent record this town came to the front. Rev. Dr. Dana has told 
the story in a volume of four hundred pages; and I think that no 
town of similar size made, during that terrific struggle, a record 
which can at all equal or which can at all compare with it. Norwich 
gave her best to the principles in which she believed. There are 
before me some who participated in that war. There are many here 
whose memories are quick to remember those whom they loved and 
whom they shall see no more; therefore it cannot be expected that I 
should even touch upon the names, for they are legion, of those 
whom Norwich sent to the war. But I trust that it will trouble no 
one if I mention the name of one dead contemporary, and just recall 
to your memory the handsome features of Henry Birge and the bril- 
liant military history of that child of this town. 

As I told you before, Mr. Donald G. Mitchell concluded his address 
by an injunction to the town of Norwich and the inhabitants of the 
town. Permit me, gentlemen, to conclude my remarks by repeating 
his words. I do it not in exactly the same spirit in which he did. 
He repeated it as an injunction: I utter it as a prophecy; knowing 
that what he wished will be certain to be fulfilled. " Now one last 
word to you who live in Norwich. You have a great trust to fill. 
We who are natives or descendants commit it solemnly to your 
charge. There are memories here that are ours as well as yours; 
cherish them faithfully! There are graves here that are ours more 
than yours; oh, guard them tenderly! We have hopes here; oh, 
build them up bravely! We have a pride here; see to it, men of 
Norwich, that our pride, your pride, a just pride, have no fall until 
the Great Hand shall gather up again the rocks and the rivers 
and the plains which he has spread out here for your abode and for 
your delight." (Prolonged applause and cheers.) 



73 

Mr. Trumbull: The name of "Good old Yale" strikes 
a responsive chord. (At this point the orchestra struck 
up that old song, " Here's to good old Yale, drink her 
down," which was heartily joined in by the entire com- 
pany.) 

Mr. Trumbull: As I was about to remark when I was 
interrupted by this bacchanalian outburst, the name of 
"Good old Yale" strikes a responsive chord in the 
heart and in the voice of every Son of the American 
Revolution, for of the few of our still few great univer- 
sities, no one can show a prouder revolutionary record 
than she. It may perhaps not be inappropriate to refer 
to the fact that not long after the revolution she made 
herself grandly unique by the utterances of a political 
malcontent of the day, John Wood by name, which still 
lives in history and which I will read to you : " This 
State has not formed any Constitution since the Revolu- 
tion; but ancient superstition and the prejudice of cus- 
tom have established an hierarchy which is directed by 
a sovereign pontiff, twelve cardinals, a council of nine, 
and about four hundred parochial bishops. The pres- 
ent priest, who may be honored with the appellation of 
pope, is Timothy Dwight, President of Yale College." 
We all know what Yale owes to the first Timothy Dwight 
and to the second Timothy Dwight, under whose admin- 
istration as president it is appropriate to say of Yale on 
Washington's birthday, 1895, that she is first in athletics, 
first in scholarship, and first in the hearts of all her sons. 
(Great cheers and cries of " Yale " long continued.) 

We will now have the honor and the great pleasure of 
listening to what President Timothy Dwight has to say 
about " Good old Yale." (Great applause and clapping 
of hands long continued.) 

PRESIDENT DWIGHT. 

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: The sentiment which has 
been assigned me is expressed in the words which have reference to 
Yale. The occasion which has called me here is the meeting of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and if Yale is to be spoken of at 



74 

all, it should be spoken of in some degree in relation to those matters 
to which this body gives its special attention and interest. I feel 
called upon to justify myself for my presence here by calling your 
attention to my claim to be a Son of the American Revolution. 

I have been walking about the streets of Norwich a little while 
this morning and I found that most of the people whom I met — in 
fact, all — apparently did not know that I was a Son of the American 
Revolution or, in fact, that I was anything else. (Laughter.) The 
look upon their faces seemed to carry with it the interrogative, "Who 
are you and what business have you to be here ? " As I was going 
away from a friend's house, after viewing the interesting pictures 
and works of art in the Slater Museum, I passed by the residence of 
one of your most prominent citizens. Immediately as I appeared on 
the sidewalk in front of that property, I was assailed by a dog and 
that dog pursued me until I had passed beyond the limits of the 
property. (Great laughter.) That Norwich dog treated me as if I 
bad come from New Haven on foot (more laughter), instead of hav- 
ing come by the New York and New Haven and Central Vermont 
Railways and paid my fare. (Renewed laughter.) He evidently 
thought that I was not a Son of the American Revolution, and my 
final thought in regard to the dog, as he approached very near to me 
as I, so to speak, emerged from the neighborhood of the property, 
was that if he pursued me a little farther, some scenes of the Ameri- 
can Revolution would be repeated. (Renewed laughter.) 

I feel, therefore, called upon to justify myself for being here. 
Fashions change — at least I believe that is the sentiment of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. (Great laughter and ap- 
plause from ladies' gallery.) When I was a boy in Norwich — a young 
boy — the old people used to talk about their ancestors, and I heard 
all about my ancestors until I thoroughly learned the lesson that I 
had the bluest of blue blood, as every Norwich-born boy had. 
(Laughter and great applause.) I did not know how it was in the 
other towns, but that honor belonged to every Norwich boy and it 
was doubtless owing to Gen. Jabez Huntington, already alluded to; 
but I understand it all. It was enjoined upon me that I should re- 
member who my ancestors were, should take pride when I went out 
into more common towns, like New Haven and Hartford (laughter), 
but after a while the fashion changed and what the blue-blood people 
did — what it was orthodox and proper for them to do, as I learned — 
was until they were forty-five years of age to do their work all day 
and spend the evening in thinking about the greatness of their 
family; and after they were forty-five to do all their work in the 
morning and spend the afternoon and evening in thinking about the 
greatness of their family; and that those who had the bluest blood 
were never to say anything about their families; they were only to 



75 

think about them. Well, after awhile I became forty-five and of 
course I followed the fashion. I did not say anything, and up to this 
noon I haven't said anything; and that was the reason that the dog 
attacked me. (Laughter and applause long continued.) Now I find 
that it is necessary for me to justify myself for being here. I want 
to tell you, if you will allow me to do so, in a few moments, why I 
have a right to be here as an invited guest. Of course I have rights 
which arise by invitation; but I want to tell you why I have certain 
rights which should be respected, and are related to Yale College, for 
that is the subject which has been given me. Now, everybody of 
these later days is studying his or her ancestry, and it is a very good 
thing. You will, therefore, pardon me if I allude to my own. 

In the first place, my grandfather, who bore my name (great 
laughter, several times renewed) — you see, gentlemen, that those 
people with bluest blood, which means those Norwich people that 
have all their ancestors' and a good deal of other ancient blood — 
know what their ancestors existed for and that they themselves are 
the culmination of the race. As I said before, my grandfather, who 
bore my name, was a chaplain in the revolutionary war. He went 
into the war about the time that General Burgoyne was about to be 
^victorious, and very soon after he arrived this warlike chaplain 
turned the course of events and General Burgoyne retired. (Great 
laughter.) He preached a sermon, the text of which indicated that 
the Ruler of the Universe had called the Northern army to its home. 
He remained in the army until he was obliged to leave it on account 
of his father's death; and being the eldest in a large family of chil- 
dren, he was obliged to return to Northampton to take charge of the 
property and of the family. So that I have a pretty good right to be 
.called a Son of the American Revolution by inheritance on the 
father's side. I am a grandson indeed, but then we are all grandsons 
in one sense and we are sons in a larger sense. 

Well, then my mother. If I should go back through my mother's 
family, they are somewhat known to fame, for I could go back to the 
Hon. Robert Walker of Stratford, who had two sons, one of whom 
graduated in 1765 and the other was in college about the time of the 
revolution, but both of them went into the American army and 
served their country with credit to themselves and to their family, and 
,one of them was my mother's grandfather. And so I come into the 
Sons of the American Revolution on my mother's side. 

Now, there was a clergyman who was a pastor in the city of New 
Haven for a number of years, who preached a sermon on a certain 
occasion, in which he referred to the energy of the Apostle Peter, 
and he said: "The Apostle Peter received his energy from his 
mother." Some friend of mine who was a little more disposed to 
criticism than Ke (j)ught to have been, I suppose, the next morning 



76 

told me of this (for I did not happen to hear the sermon myself), and 
he said: "The Rev. Mr. So and So made a slight mistake; it was 
Peter's wife's mother from whom he inherited that energy." And 
the Apostle Peter, therefore, inherited what energy he had from his 
wife's mother's side. (Great laughter.) So I am going along the 
line of my inheritance. My wife's ancestor was Roger Sherman, and 
he was a father of the revolution in a certain sense, for he signed 
the Declaration of Independence, and he had two sons who were in 
Yale College in the classes that were there just about the time of the 
American revolution, and they both entered the army; and so I 
have a claim in the same way that Peter had to be an apostle. (Re- 
newed laughter.) Now, one of these ancestors was President of Yale 
College years afterwards, and in the mysterious movements of the 
government of this world, I became president nearly one hundred 
years afterwards; and this ancestor whom I last spoke of, Roger 
Sherman, was a treasurer of Yale College; and I became treasurer 
of Yale College for a time after I became president. And I mention 
here with satisfaction that neither my ancestor during his term as 
treasurer, nor myself during my term as treasurer ever diminished 
the funds of the college. (Great applause and cheers and laughter.) 

Now, gentlemen, we do not all grow out of our fathers and mothers 
and wives' fathers and mothers; but perhaps we grow out of our 
predecessors. There was the old president of Yale College in the 
time of the revolution, old Naphtali Daggett. What did he do? 
Why, he started out against the British on his own account. He 
went all by himself when the British invaded New Haven, and when 
the students came up some time later, to their great surprise they 
found him prepared to take the British; and when the British came 
on and put the students to flight, there he was, and he fired at them, 
but they were more numerous than he was (laughter), and when the 
British commander came up and said, "What are you doing here?" 
he replied, "lam exercising the rights of war." Said the British 
commander, assuming great dignity, "Will you ever do this thing 
again when Her Majesty's troops approach?" "Nothing more 
likely," replied the brave Daggett. Then they drove him into the 
town, because they were more numerous than he was. 

Now the sonship of the American Revolution came down officially 
to me. It came down not only in the family way, but officially. It 
come also intellectually and educationally, I should say, for with the 
class of 1778, the class that was Freshman when the war broke out, 
just a little after the battle of Lexington, just after Washington had 
been appointed Commander-in-Chief, he appeared in New Haven, 
and on his retirement from the city he was conducted by the students 
as far as what was then called Neck Bridge, near East Rock, and one 
of the persons who led the way and played the fife or beat the drum 



77 

for the musicians at the head was Noah Webster. Did not the intel- 
ligent life of us all come out of Noah Webster's spelling book ? 

Now there is more of this, but I want to establish my claim so that 
it shall not be disputed, because I see that the editor of one of our 
New Haven newspapers is going to speak after me, and I want to 
establish my claim here so he won't find any fault with it. 

When the news of the battle of Lexington came to New Haven on 
Friday, the 21st of April, 1775, there was a student in the class of '75 
named Ebenezer Huntington of Norwich (applause); he was a son, if 
I mistake not, of Jabez Huntington, already alluded to, and he was 
one of those four sons who were called together upon that same 
occasion. Right here let me say that our fathers used to call their 
sons together frequently. (Great laughter.) The students were put 
into a state of considerable excitement by this news, that arrived in 
the afternoon or early evening, of the battle of Lexington. What did 
Ebenezer Huntington do? Why, most of the students raised the 
question whether it was not best to go home; they couldn't study any 
more, and whether it was not desirable for the college to break off ? 
He appealed to the faculty for permission to leave, and the faculty 
thought on the whole it was doubtful whether they had better decide 
so soon. They thought the question had better be left, whereupon 
Ebenezer Huntington left that night. He took his journey to Weth- 
ersfield, where his brother-in-law was living, and soon after he moved 
on into Massachusetts, and was present at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Ebenezer Huntington was the revolutionary ancestor of all the Nor- 
wich boys that were born here and had the right spirit. I am revo- 
lutionarily a descendant of the American Revolution, and, as Judge 
Shipman has said, I belong to the true, aristocratic family of Hunt- 
ington. So, in looking around on every side, I find that I have a 
claim to be here, and if the owner of that aforesaid dog were present 
(let me say that that house is up near the end of Washington street, 
near the corner where you turn down to go to the Falls), I hope he 
would have the dog understand who it is that goes by there. (Great 
applause and laughter.) 

Now, gentlemen, having established myself as a man with rights 
here, I want to say to you a few words with regard to Yale, and 
then, if I am allowed, a single word with regard to Norwich. 

Yale in the Revolution gave a quarter of all the graduates and 
studentsr from 1765 to 1785 to the service of the army, and those men 
who went out students and early graduates were the men, of course, 
who would be expected to go, and not the later men. These men, 
all of them, did their work with credit. They were promoted to 
prominent positions in the army, and they showed the spirit of the 
University. The same thing, as many of us remember, was mani- 
fested in the recent war. The same spirit has continued in the insti- 

7 



78 

tution from that time until now; and though we have grown, and 
though many things have changed in the country and in the institu- 
tions, yet our love of country and our spirit of devotion to country 
and liberty has remained there as strong as it was in the beginning; 
and if war were to arise now, in which justice and liberty were at 
stake, the men there now would go as the men of the old time did, 
the officers and students alike, to do what they could for the protec- 
tion of our American institutions and our American freedom. I had 
-a curiosity to look yesterday at the number of students who grad- 
uated from the college during the administration of the first President 
D wight, which continued for about twenty-two years, from 1795 to 
T[8i7, I found there were 1137 who graduated under his administra- 
tion. There are at the present time 1150 in the academical depart- 
ment of the institution, — that is, there are a few more now in the 
■college proper than the number of those who graduated during the 
itwenty-two years of his administration, and we have in addition to 
those, in the other departments of the college, 1200 men. This will 
give you some idea of the figures of our institution during the last 
century. The same thing is true of other institutions, whether of 
educational character or not, and the great things which our fathers 
promised themselves and hoped for have been realized by us as 
this century closes. As we look forward into the coming century, 
we may look forward, I think, with the greatest hope and con- 
fidence. 

Now one word in regard to old Norwich. I come here from time 
to time a stranger, knowing scarcely any one in town, no one know- 
ing me; my family friends have all passed away, and those who stood 
in any relation to me in my boyhood are no longer here. I come 
here and spend a day for the sake of acquaintance with the hills. 
They are everlasting friends; and as I pass along the streets, as I 
•pass by, for example, the old Norwich Academy building, I some- 
times think how little those who live in that building, which is now 
a house, understand the feeling of the stranger who is passing, and 
how little they realize that there is in the soul of that stranger a pos- 
session in that house which is far deeper and stronger than theirs. 
And so it is with many places here— the old hills and the old houses. 
How they fill the souls of us who have gone on in the years else- 
where and who only occasionally come here to look upon the old 
places and find the answering voices in the hills coming to us with 
the sweetness that belonged to our boyhood. As I meet our honored 
friend, Judge Shipman, who used to go with me to the Academy, 
.and think of those that have lived since then, I rejoice that my inher- 
itance is in these hills and that my early associations were here, and 
that the loves of the old days abide even to these latest days. (Great 
applause, cheers long continued, several times renewed.) 



79 

Mr. Trumbull: Let me say that that dog shall be 
properly educated or drowned. (Laughter.) There is 
one thing in President Dwight's remarks which leads 
me to make an announcement to you which I think 
ought to be made at this point. We have at our table 
to-day three members of this society whose fathers 
fought in the American Revolution. If I were Edward 
Everett, I would, as he did upon one occasion, call upon 
them all to rise, and then after these old gentlemen had 
had the trouble of doing that, I would say to them, " Be 
seated, gentlemen. It is for men like us to stand in 
your presence." (Applause.) 

It now becomes necessary for me to say that all the 
good and distinguished men of this country were not 
born in Norwich. Most of them were, as you are be- 
ginning to discover, but a few of them were not, owing 
to circumstances beyond their control. One of these 
I now have the honor to present to you. The subject 
upon which he will address you, "The Revival of Pa- 
triotism," is one upon which more than all others he 
is fitted to address you, if you can find such a sub- 
ject, and you all know it is difficult to find such a sub- 
ject. We will now have the honor of listening to Col. 
N. G. Osborn of New Haven. (Great applause and 
cries of "What's the matter with the Colonel?") 

COLONEL OSBORN. 

President, Lady and Gentlemen Revolutionists: Before approach- 
ing my theme, it seems to me, I should devote a moment to express 
regrets for matters over which I have no control. Why I was not 
born in Norwich I do not know; why my revolutionary ancestors, 
who might as well have revoluted here as anywhere else, went to a 
little town down by the sound, when they could have had these 
hills for my cradle, to which President Dwight has paid such an elo- 
quent tribute, I do not know. I am very much impressed with the 
wonders and grandeur of Norwich history as told us by Judge Ship- 
man and Dr. Dwight and illuminated by the dog, and yet there is 
one thing which Judge Shipman left in doubt, and that is whether 
Socrates was born here ? I am inclined to the opinion that the rea- 
■sons for Socrates' birth elsewhere are somewhat analogous to the 
reasons for my own birth elsewhere. 



8o 

I have a friend, a man of good habits and good character (laughter 
and derisive cheers), whose home unfortunately is in New Haven, 
who was invited to . attend a clambake given by musicians. In be- 
tween the courses some artists played either on the violin or piano or 
the harp, and his ear was so filled with music that, upon going home, 
he danced into his wife's room and said, "Wow." His wife said, 
•' What is the matter?" " Why," said he, " I am full of music." She 
said, "I think, John, that you are full of wine and you had better 
retire." I feel somewhat in that condition now. I am not in that 
position because of wine, for, unlike the man with the iron constitu- 
tion, I am not afraid to drink water for fear of rusting it. (Laughter.) 

But I have this morning been busy for an hour or so addressing 
the children in the schools of New Haven upon the subject of George 
Washington, and I feel, fortunately, as compared with the man who 
attended the clambake, full of George Washington. A more atten- 
tive, quick, sympathetic audience it was never my pleasure to talk 
to, and I could not help but feel then that the spirit and principles 
and prosperity of this organization would be carried out more grandly 
by a department of the schools given up to the study of patriotism. 
I took occasion, as I take occasion now in speaking of George Wash- 
ington, to say that it gave me pleasure to present him to them as a 
boy's boy and as a man's man. He was not a prodigy; he was not 
far removed from the sturdy patriots who surrounded him with their 
flint locks in their hands. He was by example and precept the kind 
of American America needs to help it live up to its opportunities and 
protect it from the assault of wolves in sheep's clothing who threaten 
it from within. I further said that I was tired with the conventional 
portrait that has been drawn of George Washington by enthusiasts, 
which presents him to us with too few of the human tints of color, 
too much of the deliberate suppression of the weaknesses of human 
nature, and with too much exaggeration of virtue. Men are not 
made without their weaknesses of human nature any more than 
school children are, and Washington unquestionably possessed his. 
His advantage was that he possessed more sources of strength than 
most men. I took occasion to say to those bright boys and girls, 
very much as I say it now to catch the attention of President D wight, 
that to-day we feel in sympathy because he was an enthusiastic 
admirer and participant in athletic sports, and I told them I thought 
it would help them if they could believe that if he were alive to-day 
and a member of their school, he would make a splendid left guard 
on their foot-ball team. And let me say, I never have known George 
to occupy so high a position in the estimation of the youth of this 
land as when I said that, because he was, as I took occasion to tell 
them, what we know in these days as a sportsman. He was one of 
the best field sports of his time, and as for riding horses, he was the 



best horseman in the country around, taking the ditches and fences 
that stood in his way, with easy saddle, absence of fear, and with 
the grace of a circus rider; this view of him presents him to me as 
other boys are, full of animal spirits, of muscular development, and 
of trained powers of endurance. I was very glad to be able, in my 
humble way, to give George that place in history (laughter and ap- 
plause) which certain irresponsible people had taken away from him, 
and I told those children (as I presume some of you have told your 
own children) that if they wanted to believe in the cherry tree story, 
they could believe it. It is a very good story, but it seems to me 
that it has been very much spoiled in the telling. I said to them, 
** If you will believe this cherry tree story, all right; but I would also 
have you remember that it may be much more profitable for you to 
study Washington as a boy who delighted in boys' ways, a man who 
honored man's estate by his wholesome love of the best thing, and 
perhaps a person who sometimes found a resting place across his 
mother's knee. Many a good man has been there and been improved 
by the admonition. If you insist upon the cherry tree story, I want 
you also to recall with it the fact that one time he refused to divide 
with his hungry brother a luscious apple that had been given him. 
(Applause and laughter.) It is very pleasant to me to remember 
now, especially in the presence of the daughters or the granddaugh- 
ters of the revolution — whatever they may be, lovely as they are, 
(applause and laughter). I say it is pleasant for me to remember 
that Washington had what some of our Puritan forefathers might 
have thought was a weakness to admit, but what in my youth seemed 
to me to be the source of all strength. George was very susceptible 
to the charms of the ladies. He fell in love with his ' * low land 
beauty," who afterwards became the grandmother of General Robert 
E. Lee, and he actually wrote poetry to her; and it must be a com- 
fort to you as much as to me to know that these verses were written 
in intolerable metre, that they were faulty and lame. But I am glad 
that George wrote them, and that in his excitement he did not stop 
to see whether the lines kept step or not. 

One qf the most hopeful signs of the times to me is the display in 
its proper place of the American flag. I was not born in Norwich, as 
I said, and in so far as I can, I apologize for it; but New Haven in 
this has the advantage of Norwich, it is the first city in the United 
States of America to fly the American flag 365 days in the year. 
(Applause.) It flies from the historic common, the Old Green, raised 
every morning and lowered every night by the government of the 
city of New Haven. I saw the other day that some member of the 
House of Representatives had introduced a bill providing that here- 
after the American flag shall fly from the Capitol building 365 days 
in the year, and the action of the House of Representatives in sus- 



82 

pending its rules and passing that resolution unanimously revived in 
me a faith in the General Assembly that I must confess has been 
somewhat shaken of late. (Applause.) That is one of the signs of 
the times to me. 

Then another sign of the times, which to my mind, the Sons of the 
American Revolution could with great reason and great usefulness 
adopt, in order to make the Sons carry out the spirit of their fore- 
fathers, is the question of the naturalization of foreign-born citizens. 
I have none of the prejudices that some have against the foreign- 
born citizen, but I have and I feel a prejudice against the mass of 
citizens, whether they come from far or from near, who do not make 
a proper use of their citizenship. (Great applause.) I am not certain 
but that I have a greater pity for the native born who does not live 
up to the responsibilities of his citizenship than I do for the foreign- 
born citizen who has not, by reason of his rocking in a foreign cradle, 
an appreciation that he ought to have of our American institutions. 
If I had my way — as of course I do not — I would compel by law every 
foreign-born citizen to become naturalized at his own expense. If 
he profited by the contribution of a mistaken but sympathetic neigh- 
bor, or by a misguided political party, I would have him denied 
citizenship. The man who comes to this country and does not care 
enough about a knowledge of its institutions and a knowledge of its 
laws to be naturalized on his own account and at his own expense — I 
do not care where he comes from — I do not want him to become a 
citizen of this country. (Cheers.) Beyond that, I want him to be 
able to read the English language (renewed applause and cheers); 
I want his intelligence tested from the American point of view. If 
he be a German, I do not want his intelligence to be tested by read- 
ing a passage of German; I want his intelligence tested by reading, 
not necessarily a part of the Constitution or all of the Constitution, 
in which he may be educated for that purpose, but I want him to 
read such English as may, in the judgment of the selectmen of the 
town, be good for him. I would not necessarily make him read an 
editorial in the Register. (Laughter.) 

A voice : He might do worse. 

Colonel Osborn : As to the question of a proper qualification, as 
a means of making better citizens or as a means of reviving what we 
call patriotism, which is nothing more or less than a love of country 
and pride and faith in it, I must admit I do not care what a man has 
or what he does not have. I have never lost my faith in a man be- 
cause he had nothing. I have never increased my faith in a man 
who had everything. I want simply an honest man who means to 
stand by his country and its flag, who bears out by his industry and 
sobriety the traits of character which go to give a man a place in 
your estimation, and, above all, I want him to vote. (Applause.) 



83 

But beyond that I want him, whether it be by a mechanical device 
or whether it be by a paper device — when he casts his ballot, I want 
him practically alone with his God and his pencil to do as he pleases. 
(Great applause.) I believe that genuine Americanism means that a 
man shall be re'sponsible to his God and himself in political matters, 
and to nobody else. 

There is one thing which at times does discourage me, and that 
is the tendency of the community or the tendency of the people in 
the community to go to the Legislature, if it is a State affair, or to 
go to Congress, if it is a national affair, for a cure for every little ill, 
real or fancied, which they suffer. I was amused the other day, in 
reading over as patiently as I could, without profanity, a page of the 
Hartford Courant (loud laughter), given up entirely to details of 
bills introduced upon the last day of the session for the introduction 
of new business, fully seventy-five per cent, of which were for the 
protection and advancement of private interests. About the only 
thing that I coiild find which had any public interest whatever was a 
most astonishing and most absurd bill introduced to abolish the Con- 
necticut National Guard and the Naval Militia. I think it should be 
the duty of every member of the Sons of the American Revolution to 
make the community support the government, and not the govern- 
ment the community. (Loud applause.) 

It sometimes seems to me that the attitude of a legislative com- 
mittee toward a perfectly inoffensive, well-meaning citizen, willing to 
give information of some kind in regard to a public law, is to be de- 
plored. I have been surprised at the attitude of committees toward 
an individual witness, cross-examining him and brow-beating him, 
and bulldozing him as if he were on the witness stand, as if he were 
there for some other purpose than for the purpose of doing the best 
he knew how for his community. I was surprised, the other day, at 
the attitude displayed toward a distinguished member of the faculty 
of a certain college not far from here, who, without a shadow of 
selfish interest, went before this committee to testify, to the best of 
his belief, about a certain matter that is pending; the purpose of that 
committee seemed to be to embarrass him and not to find out the 
truth. It seems to me that we need in Hartford, as well as else- 
where, a counsel for the people, — somebody who will look over the 
bills that are passed for private reasons and private snaps, and to 
take care of the great public commonwealth. I believe that to be 
the business of the governor, and I believe the governor will do it, 
but I want all governors to be sure and do it. (Loud applause.) If 
an attorney-general is necessary to whom all bills shall be referred, 
then I say, let us have an attorney-general, and fifty of them, rather 
than the passage of one act which takes away from the dignity of 
citizenship and individual effort. 



84 

Right here I want to tell a story which illustrates very well the 
tendency in some particulars of modern legislation. It is a story of 
an Irishman who bought a goat for which he paid five dollars. 
Much to his astonishment, when his tax list came round, he found 
he was taxed eight dollars for this same goat. Very much enraged, 
he went to the alderman of his ward and expressed his surprise that 
he was taxed so much, and wanted to know what was going to be 
done about it. The alderman said he would look it up. So the 
alderman looked it up and upon meeting the owner of the goat again, 
said, "That law is all right. The law reads that all property a'but- 
ting and a'bounding on the highway shall be charged four dollars 
a front foot." The goat had two front feet, and so he was taxed 
eight dollars. (Loud laughter, very much prolonged.) 

One other thing I want to say — perhaps not said for the first time 
— and that is, I do not subscribe to the somewhat prevalent idea that 
this is the only country in the world worth living in, though I fully 
believe it is destined to be the greatest along certain lines. I resent 
the idea that we are the only country in the world to the extent that 
we are to laugh at the follies and shortcomings of other countries. 
This grand country of ours has a great deal to learn by contact with 
the older countries of the world before it will take the place it is to 
be given by common consent. It may be fashionable to sneer at the 
characteristic social and political conditions that exist elsewhere, but 
it is not sensible. We can learn something from the worst of people 
as well as from the best. At the bottom of all knowledge lies experi- 
ence, which is the greatest of teachers. We can learn always from 
them something to strengthen our government, secure its institu- 
tions, and make us better. I remember last summer while traveling 
in Switzerland meeting with a gentleman in a certain village. To- 
gether we gazed upon that beautiful snow-capped Jungfrau moun- 
tain, and this American, with a look of ineffable contempt upon his 
face, said, " Humph! what is that Jungfrau compared what Pike's 
Peak ? " The idea of comparing that beautiful mountain with Pike's 
Peak seemed to me to be absurd. Enthusiasm for America, Ameri- 
can institutions, and American scenery is laudable and all right; but 
in so far as that man's enthusiasm for the Colorado giant carried 
with it pity for its Swiss competitor he showed the spirit of self- 
sufficiency that shuts off further mental growth. Each is beautiful 
in itself, and comparison is profitless. We are as a nation at the 
very outset of our career. One hundred years are but as months in 
the lifetime of a nation that has the reason to live that this nation 
has. It is for you now to consecrate yourselves to the cause of your 
country, the perpetuity of its institutions, the development and 
strengthening of its parts. And now let me say to you, as my last 
word, keep on being Americans, blush not at your follies, laugh not 
at your errors, and stand by the old flag. (Long applause.) 



8s 

President Trumbull: We cannot be too often re- 
minded of our duties as the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. We have been most eloquently reminded of 
some of these duties, but there are still further injunc- 
tions to be heard from the eloquent Col. Jacob L. Greene 
of Hartford, who will now address us upon ''The Duty 
of the Sons." 

COL. JACOB L. GREENE. 

That most virile and inspiring of the New England poets, who more 
than thirty years ago was singing battle hymns to a nation fighting 
for its life, structural and spiritual, paused in mid strife to marl?; this 
eternal law: 

" Time Was, unlocks the riddle of Time Is, 
That opens choice of glory or of gloom; 
The Solver makes Time Shall Be surely his." 

So far, the moral government of the world by a personal intelli- 
gence moving by cause and consequence toward an ever evolving 
purpose is the only workable hypothesis. There is no other theory 
of a really constructive character finding its response in the mental 
and moral structure and so capable of guiding conduct. And life 
must be lived; it cannot fulfill itself in mere doubt and criticism. In 
such a theory the argument from design, the inference of purposes 
from appropriate and adequate potencies, is perfect. The capacities 
and adaptations of any group of forces, whether embodied in men or 
machines, are indissolubly related in all thinking with the ends upon 
which their content of power is effectively expended. The purpose 
accomplished explains that which accomplishes it; and there is no 
other explanation. And so the uniform capacities and adaptations 
of men and their needs as well, all repeated continually in endless 
generations, point with insistent iteration to a continuing, persisting, 
always accomplishing, but never accomplished purpose of the world's 
Maker to be wrought out in the slow succession of ages by the 
workers whom He has equipped for the task He has committed to 
their capacity. And here, in part, is the bottom of the sense of human 
solidarity, of historic continuity, of true succession, of a hope and a 
law of progressive, continuous development and harmonization in 
the conscious aims and methods of the race. Herein lies the value 
of the accumulations of the experience and culture of the ages to be 
utilized in new results; inheritances they are of inspiration, sugges- 
tion and power, carrying, therefore, responsibility to those receiving 
them. The workers change, but the endlessly developing task re- 
mains; men come and strive and pass, and each successive genera- 



86 

tlon puts its newly skilled hands to the same problem a whose evolv- 
ing men must assist so long as men are. 

This is the link between the lives of father and son, which hands 
on human problems from generation to generation, keeps them in a 
state of continuing solution and prevents them ever dropping out of 
sight until they have been squared to that ideal in the Divine mind 
for which the Divine in us compels the ceaseless search. Therefore 
our whence and our whither are indissolubly linked; they are parts 
of one stream. Our promise of accomplishment in the one lies in our 
faithfulness to the other. To honor father and mother is not the 
mere fulfillment of a tender personal relation. It is the absolute law 
of fruitful life. A present not loyal to all that is worthy, vital and 
inspiring in the past is life brought to an end, a perversion of means, 
a destruction of purposes, a failure of power. There is no future for 
it. It has lost its seed. Dislocated, dissociated and sterile, there is 
for it no length of days, no principle or power of continuance or per- 
petuation. 

The validity of our sonship lies not in genealogies. We ask not, 
Are we of Israel ? but. Are we Israel ? Do our fathers live anew and 
more hopefully in us ? Do they in us carry further forward and more 
clearly their high undertakings ? Do we gaze upon the same fixed 
stars and walk by the light of the same higher risen sun ? Do we 
purpose the same high service, dare the same foes, breathe the same 
spirit, drink of their rock, feed on their manna, and march and dwell 
between the same cloud and fire ? Have we held fast the secret of 
their mission, grasped its scope, discovered its growing details, 
shaped ourselves to their fit agency, and consecrated ourselves to 
their prosperous development ? 

There is a touch of supreme pathos in certain simple faiths in us 
everywhere evinced and implied in the work our fathers did in doubt 
and struggle, with sacrifice and pain. They builded in dependence 
on the future for the full justifying event of their work, in clear faith 
in us, their sons, that we would not let so high, so mighty a trust fail 
for want of loyalty, courage, patriotism, or an ever lively sense of 
the highest human interests, and in clear faith also that the highest 
interests and highest motives would of necessity govern us. And so 
they confidently framed for themselves and for us a political system 
embodying the highest principles of political ethics; a system which 
only the highest and sturdiest human qualities can successfully apply 
to the current problems of life and keep in ever growing, healthful 
vigor. Trusting their own truth and faith in God, they trusted ours, 
and left us an heritage which* only that truth and faith can truly 
possess and keep and use, and bless the world withal. Mark the way 
in which, under a deep and ever present sense of responsibility to the 
future, they wrought into workable political form their theory of 



87 



right and duty, and bound them in one with each other in that third 
element of the political trinity, liberty under one law for all; what 
faith they had that we would never forget that freedom means noth - 
ing but opportunity to do; that it therefore involves responsibility 
for doing and implies duty to do, and that without the full acceptance 
of these there is no right to the opportunity; that inheritance means 
resource and opportunity and duty and responsibility which we can- 
not delegate nor abandon, nor see appropriated without dishonor. 
No true king can abdicate or see his powers usurped. 

They built upon the fond assumption everywhere manifest in their 
work, that we would prize freedom's opportunity as they did, would 
understand it as they did, use it for the same ends, guard it as 
jealously from unfriendly or ignorant hands; that neither through 
sloth, preoccupation nor false sentiment would we allow it to degen- 
erate into license and disorder, or to be prostituted for private gain 
or selfish ambition. 

With prophetic mind they laid here the beginnings of the temple of 
the world's new hope for humanity, on foundation lines so simple, so 
sound, so universal, so capable of indefinite extension that it might 
effectively cover our whole new world " enthroned between her sub- 
ject seas; " and we are their trustees to possess, administer and pro- 
tect this high and vast estate for our children and for the strangers in 
our gates, until they too be transformed into true children raised up 
from the stones of the foreign drift. 

They foresaw in our hands a stable government of impartial law; of 
law made to be obeyed, in the hands of men who would not shirk its 
execution for the foul favor of those against whom its process runs. 
They did not foresee a generation of men nervously striving to so 
frame laws that they should execute themselves, and so relieve their 
officers of disagreeable responsibility. 

They conceived of our politics as the clean, unselfish methods of a 
simple, sincere, all embracing patriotism, and offering to capable, sin- 
cere and high-minded men beneficent and honorable and permanent 
careers. They did not contrive instrumentalities for a partisanship 
which deals with questions of public weal as matters of tactics against 
a political opponent, and prefers vexing the opposition to relieving the 
nation. They did not dream of parties controlled by the same spirit 
as the Church of the Middle Ages, building and perfecting organiza- 
tion and exalting it above all else, to the same aggrandizement of a 
political hierarchy by the exploitation of the political laity, and split 
at last into factions fighting over the rotten spoils. Nor did they 
dream of the public business as a public crib; of its being so parceled 
and farmed out among the political hierarchs as the sustenance and 
hire of their followers, that it could no longer afford a career to intel- 
ligence, industry, faithfulness, and zeal and honorable motive; that 



88 

the insecure and arbitrary tenure of a public business office should 
become a sign and pledge of servitude to some political lord ; that the 
interest and concern of all should be left to corrupt and irresponsible 
hands, and the administration of the public weal be made a means of 
debauching and destroying political integrity and personal character. 
They did not anticipate sons submissive to such comprehensive spoli- 
tion of their manhood. 

They built up representative government because they believed 
we would seek out representatives of the intelligence, virtue, honor 
and high-minded patriotism of a people filled with these qualities 
and bringing them to bear in their affairs. They did not dream of 
legislatures trying to legislate away from themselves the temptation 
to sell the power of the people to the highest cash bidder. They did 
not dream of a people descended from their loins who could choose as 
their representatives in the highest of political functions and the 
agents of their sovereignty — the only sovereignty known to our life — 
men to whom such temptations could dare approach; men who must 
forbid a solicitation they cannot trust themselves and cannot be 
trusted by their constituents to resist. They knew that character is 
the only guard for honor. They expected us to have it in ourselves 
and to require it in our political agents, and so to dwell in political 
purity. They expected us to choose our best to serve us in our high- 
est and common concerns, and not to merely ratify corrupt bargains 
at the dictation of the traders. 

Living in the strenuous and sustained activity of the long and 
troubled dawn of free institutions, accustomed to the deep and abid- 
ing seriousness of its moods, steadfast in the prolonged intellectual 
and spiritual struggles out of which liberty under law was born, 
while the life was yet infinitely more than the meat, and in 
perilous question, they little foresaw how under a political sys- 
tem where government is the equal concern of all and not of 
a specific person or class, there is a peculiar and ever present 
temptation from mere vis znerticB for each to wait for the other, 
and so to stand intellectually and morally unbraced and unready 
until danger has become imminent. But out of that dead level 
of common responsibility of which no one can demand that an- 
other shall take an unequal burden, and which tends therefore 
to equilibrium and stagnation, have we developed that most specific 
of American political products, the Boss. He centers upon his 
selfishly purposeful and shrewd personality the partially uncen- 
tered, unbraced human material about him, touches its hunger and 
owns it. We do not well watch together the current nor pull 
together against it until we hear the roar of the rapids and see the 
smoke of the fall; and then we find our crew split into many groups, 
each following for crumbs the personal ambitions and fortunes of its 



89 

self-appointed and absolute master, content to take knowledge, guid- 
ance and inspiration from his craft and power. And in these groups 
the "Clan," with all its narrow and pernicious clannishness, with its 
failure to comprehend the whole in one, with its destructive hostility 
toward all who do not utter its shibboleth, with its indifference to the 
greater and higher interests, and with its blind, selfish grasp upon 
only those of personal and immediate effect, not only survives but 
multiplies in our political life. Nor does it lessen for us the gravity 
of the involved problem that the same dangerous portent is 
rising above the horizon whenever democratic government is being 
developed. 

Realizing the eternal dignity, value and significance of the indi- 
vidual man— child of God— and that the whole becomes perfect only 
in the perfection of each of its parts, and that the highest fruit of 
human development is the free man, unconstrainedly accepting his 
own responsibility and giving himself gladly and God-like to the 
willing service of his kind, they did not doubt that we would be 
obedient to the same heavenly vision, nor give our heritage of 
power and infinite opportunity into the hands of those who would 
both indolently avoid the responsibility of true individual living 
themselves and enviously prevent and destroy its fruit in others, 
by reducing all to a scholastic slavery, with the mob for the 
tyrant. 

Filled with a sense of the gravity of their work, believing it had 
been committed to them of God for the bettering of the nations, and 
trained to sacrifice, they did not dream of sons given up to exploita- 
tion for personal advantage of the commercial opportunity of the 
land to which their fathers gave structure and impulse, politically 
and socially, intellectually and spiritually, and leaving the adminis- 
tration of their father's house to strange hands, bred in alien methods, 
to whom liberty is too often but evil license and to whom lawful 
order is too often the intolerable restraint upon the beast of prey. 
Their work assumed that our first concern would be to so interpret 
their ideals to our children and to the proselytes coming into all our 
borders that the true political faith and the highest and steadiest 
human impulse should be everywhere conserved and made perpetu- 
ally and increasingly effective to the great uplifting of the watching 
world and our own greater peace. Men who had carried their art 
through every diversity of trial and difficulty did not look for sons 
who should flinch at new ones or surrender or abandon their trust to 
new foes. They had a right to expect from us whatever sacrifice of 
personal taste, convenience and advantage might be found necessary 
in calmly and steadfastly facing new facts, new conditions, and new 
situations, and proving in each a new fitness and value of that which 
their art contains; that the dust and grime and sweat of every need- 



90 

ful toil would be bravely and instantly accepted for the safety of the 
burden laid upon them and us for humanity's sake. 

And all these faithful expectations, these God-like hopes of the 
fathers for the children, we must fulfill. We may not longer weakly 
complain of the political and social mischief maker. To avoid per- 
sonal loss of time and commercial profit and the disagreeable inci- 
dents of resistance, we have yielded him ground and opportunity. 
We have made him. We have refused to do right at once and 
always and for mere righteousness' sake and so to keep the balance 
to the good. We have waited too often the compulsion of dire neces- 
sity. Too often have we set aside our best men and in weak, care- 
less good nature crowned smart, forceful, scheming ambition. We 
have failed to train the swarms that come homing to our hive to use 
according to its God-given intent that priceless legacy from our 
fathers, the power we have given the political stranger. And they 
are using it according to their misconception while we have gone 
about our farms and our merchandise. And they have made mer- 
chandise of our politics and our institutions. We have allowed all 
that exists. 

If we deem ourselves to have a better inheritance than they, if we 
assert a better knowledge, a clearer light, a higher ideal and a purer 
spirit, a more savory salt for the world's saving, we have not always 
sufficiently shown it by a quick and jealous perception of evil and a 
resolute grapple at its throat; we have too much shown our finer 
•quality only by bemoaning the wrong, despising its doers, but shun- 
ning the conflict. The ethical sense, however refined and true, that is 
not ready to do battle always and everywhere for the truth it is given 
to see is a barren perception, without the potency of becoming a 
virtue. It must clothe itself with the sinews of power. 

"The Lord is a man of war." Victory is not by high assumptions 
and delicately accurate criticism; but by plain, straight, manly fight- 
ing, striking with God-given power, and enduring with the eternal 
patience, in whatever arena the battle is set between the false and 
the true, the high and the base, in human living. And if we are 
sons of our fathers, if we have truly received aught from them for 
the good of our generation in these swift-moving days of mightier 
things than the world's stage has ever before borne, aught of whole- 
some knowledge, of virtue and of fertile power, it is ours manfully 
and strenuously to assert it in the affairs of public concern and gen- 
eral good; not arrogantly, self-righteously, nor for personal ends. 
But, as possessors of a sacred trust, sacred as the Divine deposit 
with our fathers, sanctified by their prayers, baptized by their tears, 
fertilized by their willing blood, we may not dare to fail, soberly, 
with personal modesty, but with a clear and unflinching recognition, 
of what God has equipped us with to help His ends withal and unde- 



91 

terred by any sneer, not as sole lords, but at least as rightful f>rimz 
inter pares in doing duty in the house of our fathers, to bring our 
gift of light and leading and power to bear with our might that the 
purpose of God in them shall not fail in us who bear their names. 

And again our singer strikes the common chord that lifts the grow- 
ing struggle of our day into stern harmony with those mighty labors 
of our Ancient Men: 

" God give us peace! not such as lulls to sleep, 

But sword on thigh, and brow with purpose knit! 

And let our Ship of State to harbor sweep, 
Her ports all up, her battle lanterns lit, 

And her leashed thunders gathering for their leap." 

President Trumbull: Gentlemen, we are glad to 
have heard so much poetry in the address to which we 
have just listened. It should be — but it is not — a rule 
of this society that the poet who can sing but won't 
sing must be made to sing on Washington's birthday. 
I have endeavored to persuade our fellow-member from 
New London to tune his lyre to this occasion. His flow- 
ing numbers are familiar to all of you; but with the 
modesty of the true poet he has declined, yet with the 
loyalty of a Son of the Revolution he has consented to 
speak rather than sing. We are fortunate in the subject 
which he has selected, because to have a dinner with 
that subject omitted would be to celebrate Washington's 
Birthday with Washington left out. '* The Day We 
Celebrate " will now be celebrated 

" In russet yeas and honest kersey noes " 

l)y the poet, Mr. Walter Learned of New London. 

MR. LEARNED. 

Mr. President and Fellow Members of the Sons of the Revolution : 
When the president invited me to speak at this dinner, he suggested 
that I might deliver myself of a poem for this occasion, and was kind 
enough to add that should I conclude to do so, the fire escapes would 
be removed and the doors would be locked. I confess that the pros- 
pect of thus finding myself sure of an audience was an alluring one. 

But when I reflected what means of escape from torture helpless 
.and persecuted men might adopt, and remembered how even the rat, 



92 

finding every avenue of escape closed, will turn with unwonted 
ferocity upon its pursuers, I shuddered at the prospect of finding 
myself at the mercy of thoroughly desperate men. With a family 
dependent upon me for support I had no right to run such a risk, 
even in such a cause. 

*' And thus the native hue of resolution 
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought; 
And enterprises of great pith and moment, 
With this regard, their currents turn awry." 

I am without rhyme or metre, nor need you stand upon the order 
of your going. 

I shall count myself happy if on this day that we celebrate I can 
clear the character of Washington from the one aspersion cast upon 
it, and to this end let me devote the few moments that are mine. 

I am convinced that nothing has been so detrimental to the char- 
acter of Washington as the widespread though somewhat apocryphal 
story of the cherry tree and the hatchet. Few public men could 
have survived this anecdote. 

I am inclined, and I am sure that you are, to agree with Mark 
Twain, who claimed a higher moral plane than Washington's, be- 
cause, he said, " The difference between George Washington and 
myself is, that George Washington couldn't tell a lie, while I can, 
but I won't." 

Frankly, this anecdote produces a disagreeable impression, and I 
think justly. From the point of view from which misguided moral- 
ists have hammered it into the youth of our land it has been and is 
exceedingly damaging. This kind of moralist loves to tack some 
namby pamby anecdote on to the history of a really great man, a 
process as destructive as the interpolation of a verse from Tate and 
Brady's version of the Psalms into In Memoriam. 

The anecdote as universally told implies that the world-famous 
reply, " Father, I cannot tell a lie, I did it," indicated that Washing- 
ton was of such intense moral fibre that a lie was impossible to him. 
Now, I wish to point out that to a nature of so high a moral order 
that a lie is an impossibility, the thought of a lie would never occur. 
Such a one instinctively and as a matter of course, speaks the truth, 
and that not boastfully. 

Should a stranger come into your dining room or mine, when such 
silver spoons as we have were displayed on the table, and say, ' ' I am 
not a thief, I cannot steal them," we would instantly and prudently 
lock up our silver and take particular pains in fastening our doors 
that night. 

Such boastful assertion of a virtue casts reasonable suspicion upon 
the boaster. 



93 

Impregnable virtue is unconscious virtue. 

I say the story is an apocryphal one, but the persistency of its 
repetition may have led some to fear that it is true. It may be. The 
trouble is not in the story, but in the false reading of it. 

What were the circumstances? The young Washington was the 
only boy for some six miles around. In the morning his father 
had given him a hatchet. In the evening the cherry tree was cut 
down. 

What temptation to mendacity was there here to one bright enough 
to grasp the circumstances and see the overwhelming chain of cir- 
cumstantial evidence against him? That a mere boy should have 
so readily appreciated the circumstances speaks volumes for his 
sagacity. t 

With that clear discernment which in later troublous times stood 
him in such good stead, that acumen to which posterity owes so 
much, that instant review and quick decision which made him the 
leader of men and the founder of a nation, young Washington saw 
the case against him and the overwhelming evidence. He knew 
that his parent knew the culprit, and he replies at once, "I cannot 
tell a lie, I did it." 

Small wonder that the parent clasped him to his heart. I have 
neither a son nor a cherry tree, but I would sacrifice both if I had 
them rather than offspring of mine should tell such a stupid, foolish, 
useless lie as this would have been. 

From this point of view I hold that the anecdote is consonant with 
the character of Washington as we have it. And I shall be glad if 
I have enabled some of you to read this story hereafter without feel- 
ing that the Father of his Country was either a hypocrite or a prig. 
(Applause.) 

President Trumbull: We all know that the War of 
the Revolution was fought by men from Connecticut, 
with a little assistance from the neighboring State of 
Massachusetts; and perhaps something was done by the 
gallant cavaliers of the South. It requires that a Nor- 
wich man should make a residence of some years in the 
South in order to be able to respond to the next senti- 
ment upon our list, **The South in the Revolution," 
which will now be spoken of by my old friend and school- 
mate, whom I now have the honor and the pleasure to 
introduce to you, Capt. Henry P. Goddard. 



94 

CAPTAIN GODDARD. 

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen : During the closing days 
of the late civil war, as Sherman's army was marching through 
Virginia on its famous March to the Sea, a regiment passed through 
the city of Richmond with a sudden and indescribable manner and 
tread that attracted the attention of the bystanders. One of them 
called out, "What regiment is that?" Quick as a flash came the 
answer, " The first class in geography or the lost sons of Connecti- 
cut, the Fifth Connecticut." Many of you are familiar with the 
"history of that much marching regiment and will appreciate the 
■force of this story. It seems to me that my position here to-night is 
a little like that of my good friends of the Fifth Connecticut. I stand 
before you as a lost son of Connecticut, thirteen years a resident of 
an adopted state, concerning whose history — not whose geography — 
I propose to tell you something to-night. Upon this subject given 
me in the toast I might generalize at length; instead of that I shall 
generalize very little, as time is limited. I shall specialize a little bit 
•upon the history of the State of Maryland in the war of the revolu- 
tion, as with that I am naturally most familiar. 

The Maryland Society, S. A. R., holds its annual meeting and din- 
ner on the 19th of October, instead of the 226. of February, as " The 
Peggy Stewart Anniversary," which it holds to be the most notable 
of its /oca/ revolutionary anniversaries. At one of its recent dinners 
a letter was read from a Tennessee judge congratulating the society 
on celebrating the day, and "thus helping keep in memory a brave 
and beautiful Maryland heroine." How many of my auditors to-day 
will understand why this letter was greeted with roars of laughter ? — 
probably not many. It was because the " Peggy Stewart " was a 
brig (nothing is known of the person for whom it was named, except 
that she is said to have witnessed the conflagration from the home of 
her father, one of the vessel's owners), that was unfortunate enough 
to arrive in the harbor of Annapolis, Md., one fine October day in the 
year 1774, with a cargo of tea. It is not necessary to remind a New 
England audience that this being but a few months after the Boston 
Tea Party, the scent of that beverage was not grateful to patriotic 
nostrils. The Maryland patriots were no less quick to act than 
those of Massachusetts, and gathering from all the country round, 
demanded the immediate burning of the ship and all its contents. 
After vainly pleading to be permitted to land and to destroy the 
cargo by itself, the owner made a virtue of necessity and fired the 
ship with his own hand. 

One who is a son of New England will not be charged with dis- 
loyalty to his own section (the dearest part of the country to him 
always) when he says that the history of this Maryland Tea Party 



95 

reflects as much credit upon the participants as does that of the 
patriots of Massachusetts on a similar occasion. It is true that in 
Boston there were troops and ships near by to make the action of the 
patriots who destroyed the tea dangerous, but they acted under cover 
of night and in disguise. In Maryland all was done in broad light of 
day, no masks were worn, and while there was no immediate danger, 
yet every participant knew that the tories in the community would 
note his presence, and that if Great Britain ever got control of affairs, 
a rope might dangle about his neck. 

The North, with its superior educational advantages, has produced 
distinguished historians who have admirably told the story of its 
services in the war of the revolution, and the search-lights of mod- 
-ern historical methods of investigation have been flashed into all the 
notable events of its history. The South has had fewer writers, but 
investigation and study reveal that she had her full share of great 
actions, great heroes (both civic and military), and patriotic people. 

It is not even necessary to name the Virginian who was ' ' First in 
war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen," unless 
it be to say his fame and reputation, unlike that of most great men, 
seem to increase as the years recede. The more we know of him the 
•greater he becomes. In this connection let me commend to you the 
latest and one of the best lives of Washington, as that of Gen. Brad- 
ley T. Johnson of Maryland, who loves to call himself "An unre- 
constructed rebel," but whose heart grows very soft over every 
Yankee he meets, as your president can attest. He was president of 
your Maryland Society and is deeply interested in your order. 

Right here let me tell you a story which illustrates the character of 
General Johnson, who had no respect whatever for the New England 
conscience. If he had, he never would have been commander of the 
Southern army. I have an aimable weakness, as some of my friends 
inow, in the recent years, of not saying very much about my ances- 
tors, but speaking a great deal about a single descendant. That 
little descendant is quite fond of Scripture stories. One of his 
favorite stories is that of Elisha and the bears. When I first told 
General Johnson the story, of how interested the boy was, and his 
reply, " Papa, what good bears those were to eat those children up," 
General Johnson's response was, " There it goes again, your New 
England conscience, always seeking to find the Divine equities." 

Of Southern born statesmen of the revolution I need only to 
name Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Madison, and Monroe. 

Of Southern generals the most notable were Marion, "the Swamp- 
fox of the Revolution, "and Moultrie, both of South Carolina, Sumter 
and " Light-horse Harry Lee " of Virginia, the father of Gen. R. E. 
Lee. He was the right hand of your Rhode Island General Greene in 
all the successful campaigns of the former in the revolution, and of 



96 

him Greene ever wrote and spoke in the highest estimation. His 
" Memoirs of the War in the Southern Department of the United 
States " is still a standard authority on revolutionary matters. It is 
curious to note that his death was finally occasioned by wounds 
received while quelling a riot at Baltimore in 1814. 

The battle-fields of the South in the revolutionary war include 
Camden, Cowpens, Eutaw Springs, King's Mountain, Guilford Court 
House, Charleston, Savannah, and Yorktown. These names tell 
their own story, as every schoolboy will admit. 

But how the Southern troops fought on Northern soil in the war of 
the revolution has not been told you as it should be. Do you know 
that Colonels Smallwood and Gist, with the Maryland line, were 
the men who at the battle of Long Island saved the honor of the 
American army, if not the army itself, leading General Washington 
to exclaim when he saw their slaughter, " Great God, what must my 
brave boys suffer to do this ! " 

Paul Revere's ride is and should be a household word with you, 
but a fitting subject for a companion poem or story is that of the ride 
of Col. Tench Tilghman of Washington's staff, a Maryland officer of 
the so-called " Silk Stocking Light Battery " of Philadelphia, who bore 
to Congress the news of the final surrender of Cornwallis. How he 
sailed down York river and across the turbulent Chesapeake bay in 
a rickety little craft, and then galloped up the whole length of the 
eastern shore of Maryland, obtaining relays of horses by simply 
shouting "Yorktown has surrendered," as he roused the planters by 
night, and then kept on his weary but happy way through little 
Delaware until he reached Philadelphia at midnight, needs a Long- 
fellow to describe. 

Yet the Maryland soldiers were at first not popular in the revolu- 
tionary army. The Northern troops on duty with them in New York 
called them "Butterflies," the reason for which appears in Graydon's 
Memoirs, where he says: " There were none by whom an un officer- 
like appearance and deportment could be less tolerated than by a 
city bred Marylander, who, at this time, was distinguished for the 
most fashionably cut coat, the most macaroni cocked hat, and the 
hottest blood in the union." Yet it is the Northern Washington 
Irving that pays highest tribute to the gallantry of these so-called 
"macaroni regiments," and says, "'The Maryland Line ' was soon 
recognized as a portion of the army upon which Washington could 
always safely depend." 

The gallant Col. John Eager Howard, of Maryland, who won many 
jaurels on Southern battle-fields and was afterwards Governor of 
Maryland, married Margaret or "Peggy" Chew, one of the Phila- 
delphia belles who attended that famous " Mischienza" performance 
at Philadelphia, the chief manager of which was one Major John 



97 

Andre, who there wore her colors. It is told to me in Balti- 
more by one of her descendants, who had it from her daughter- 
in-law who was present, that years after Mrs. Howard spoke of 
her old beau Andre to a visiting Englishman, as a charming young 
fellow, at which the irate Howard interjected, "He was a damned 

spy." 

As to how the women of the Southern colonies showed their patri- 
otism, I could tell you many an anecdote. For a while, as the cap- 
tured Baroness de Riedesel records of Maryland, "In this country it 
will be held a crime to refuse hospitality to a traveler, yet their 
hearts were thoroughly loyal." On his way South previous to the 
siege of Yorktown, La Fayette attended a ball given in his honor in 
Baltimore. He was observed to appear sad, and on being questioned 
by one of the ladies present as to the cause, replied, " I cannot enjoy 
the gayety of the scene while so many of my poor soldiers are in 
need of clothes." The quick response was, "We will supply them," 
and the next morning that ball room was turned into a clothing fac- 
tory. Among the dancers at the ball who next day were busy with 
their needle were doubtless many who a few months later were pres- 
ent in our old State House at Annapolis at that historic scene when 
Washington surrendered to Congress his commission as Commander- 
in-Chief of the revolutionary army. It was in this chamber that the 
Sons of the Revolution held their last annual congress, and the Sons 
of the American Revolution of Maryland had before held anniversary 
exercises there. 

Connecticut is justly proud of Putnam leaving his plow at the call 
of his country. South Carolina is no less proud of Marion entertain- 
ing at dinner a British officer, who had come to see him concerning a 
change of prisoners. The dinner consisted of roast potatoes, served 
off pieces of bark. When the Englishman learned that this was the 
ordinary fare and that the American troops received no pay, he re- 
marked " that he had little hope of conquering a country whose 
defenders could thus submit to toil and privation simply for the love 
of liberty. " 

In Mrs. Ellet's Domestic History of the Am.erican Revolution are 
many pleasant anecdotes showing the courage and pluck of the 
Southern women. She states that during the battle of Cowpens the 
famous British Guerrilla, Colonel Tarleton, was closely pursued by a 
Colonel Washington. Coming up with his foe, Colonel Washington 
struck him and wounded two of his fingers, his sword passing the 
guard of Colonel Tarleton. Later in the war the British colonel 
remarked to a Carolina lady that "he should like to have an oppor- 
tunity of seeing this favorite hero. Colonel Washington." The lady 
replied, " If you had looked behind you, Colonel Tarleton, at the 
battle of Cowpens, you would have had that pleasure. " 



98 

When Lord Rawdon and his British troops occupied the large 
mansion of Mrs. Rebecca Mott of South Carolina, ancestress of Mrs. 
Donald G. Mitchell of New Haven, Connecticut, she took refuge in a 
small farm house not far off. Here Marion and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Lee arrived to besiege the British works. When they found they 
could not drive out Rawdon without burning her mansion, Mrs. Mott 
not only assented, but even furnished the patriots with bows and 
arrows, which had been imported from India for that purpose. Balls 
of blazing rosin and brimstone were attached to the arrows which 
were then discharged, and fired the roof and cannonading ensued 
which ended in the surrender of the British. 

A Miss Elliott was living with her mother at a country house seven 
miles from Charleston. At one time she was having a visit from 
Col. Lewis Morris, whom she afterwards married, when the British 
suddenly surrounded the house in search of him. Miss Elliott 
opened the window and demanded of the dragoons what they 
wanted. *'We want the rebel," was the reply. "Go and look for 
him in the American army," answered the young girl. "How dare 
you disturb a family under the protection of both armies?" Her 
firmness conquered, and they left without their prisoner. 

Another South Carolina heroine was a Mrs. Martin, who at her 
country home some miles from Charleston during the siege of that 
city in 1780, had with her the wives of. her three sons, all then in 
Charleston. They were all much agitated until the mother (the 
story comes to us from a grandson, then a boy of five years) 
hearing the sound of the cannon, lifted her hands and eyes to 
heaven and exclaimed, "Thank heaven, they are the children of 
the Republic ! " 

May we not all of us, descendants of revolutionary sires, rever- 
ently join in this sentiment, and whether our colonial ancestors 
settled at Plymouth, on the Hudson, the Delaware, the Potomac, the 
York, or the James, or whether our revolutionary forefathers fought 
with Putnam or with Marion, at Bunker Hill, or at Cowpens, rejoice 
that we are all " The Children of the Republic." 

Sons of the Revolution of Connecticut, you are justly proud of your 
revolutionary ancestry, but remember that they fought for the Union 
and not for the State, and that side by side with the men of Dela- 
ware, of Maryland, of Virginia, of Georgia, and of the Carolinas they 
can say: 

" Many with crossed hands sighed for her; 
But these, our fathers, wrought for her; 
At life's dear peril fought for her, 
So loved her that they died for her." 

(Applause.) 



99 

President Trumbull: Gentlemen, although it is later 
than it should be at this hour in the evening, there are 
still some good things in store for those of you whO' 
cannot leave until the 7.15 train. Among them, I have 
the honor to say that there is still another son of Balti- 
more, or, more properly, a son of Connecticut, who has 
been attracted to our gathering, and we cannot allow 
him to go without a few words. It was decided at our 
dinner at Meriden that the Sons should be instrumental 
in forming a new and correct history of the State of 
Connecticut. The only question was who should write 
it. I can assure you, gentlemen, that the man is found 
at last. He has already contributed more to Connecti- 
cut history than any other contemporary writer whom 
I know of, with the exception of Johnson. He has 
written a history of slavery in Connecticut, for which 
he will apologize, if apology is needed. He has also 
written a history of education in Connecticut for which,. 
I know, no apology is needed, and which is the pride of 
us all. Let me now introduce Mr. Bernard C. Steiner^ 
of Baltimore. 

MR. STEINER. 

Mr. President, Sons and Daughters of the Revolution : In case it 
should seem to you somewhat strange that a man who has lived in 
Maryland since he was two months of age, having had the good for- 
tune to be born in Connecticut, should be selected to speak at the 
Connecticut banquet, let me illustrate my position with the story of 
a western Maryland German, a resident of a portion of the state in 
which I lived sixteen years. He was a rather ignorant man and did 
not understand the English language as well as he might have done. 
A great misfortune befell him. His wife died, and on the day of the 
funeral he came into the darkened parlor where the children were- 
wailing, and in the intense state of his feeling, and in the attempt to 
comfort them, he said, " Hush your noise, hush your noise! you shall 
ride in the first hack. Don't you think I am as much mortified as. 
any of you ?" So, gentlemen, I stand in the same position as did the 
German. "Don't you think I am as much mortified as any of you ?'" 

It is a great honor to be allowed to speak at a Connecticut dinner. 
I have always felt that my two states, Connecticut and Maryland, 
were states which on several occasions had lacked only one virtue. 



TOO 

When I was in the Law School, our old professor of equity prefaced 
his first lecture by saying, " Young gentlemen, allow me to inculcate 
upon you as one of the prime qualities for a lawyer that you cultivate 
the virtue of self-protrusiveness." The State of Maryland and the 
State of Connecticut have not cultivated the virtue of self-protrusive- 
ness. I do not refer to the city of Norwich in my statement, because 
if I did I should have to modify it after what I have heard here this 
afternoon. I had an idea that something had been done in the 
revolution in New Haven county, where I was born, but I have dis- 
covered since I have been here that the gentlemen of Norwich were 
responsible for the largest share in the revolution. 

There is another reason why I am surprised that I should be asked 
to speak at a Connecticut banquet, and that is because my town, 
which, like Norwich, is chiefly built on hills, the present city of 
Baltimore, has recently shown, according to one interpretation, a 
marked discourtesy toward the man in whose honor we meet to-day, 
our first President, George Washington. The city of Baltimore was 
foremost in honoring him, and the monument which she erected in 
his memory was the first in the country, and gained her the name of 
the "Monumental City," which she still bears. But of late years, a 
wealthy citizen, desiring to ornament the beautiful squares which 
surround the monument, caused the grounds to be adorned in vari- 
ous places with some of Baryes' marvelous bronzes, making the 
bronze figure of a lion face the beautiful stone pillar, on the top of 
which stands the colossal figure of George Washington. An Eng- 
lishman came to Baltimore one day, and as he walked up this street 
he came to Washington Place, and asked a colored man whom he 
met there, why it was that they had placed the lion there at the foot 
of this beautiful monument to the country's founder. " Well, Boss," 
said the darkey, " I reckon the lion hez treed George, an' is waitin' 
fur him to come down." (Loud laughter.) 

There is another thing wherein the State of Connecticut and the 
State of Maryland can join together in the revolutionary history, 
and that is that they worked in a solid way, and they built on a solid 
foundation. Now, it is a splendid thing to have a solid foundation 
whereon to build. There was a good Connecticut deacon once who 
did not have such a foundation. Once upon a time in a very misty 
day, he decided that it was not a good day to go to work upon his 
crops, and therefore he would shingle his barn, that very badly 
needed shingling. So he got upon his roof with his nails and 
shingles, and worked away very industriously for three or four hours, 
until about noon, when he discovered that he had shingled three and 
a half feet out into the fog. That was not the kind of a foundation 
which was laid by the men of Connecticut and the men of Mary- 
land. 



lOI 

The ancient Romans held on the 226. of February a feast which 
they called the Charistta, at which they had a banquet in honor of 
those who had gone before and whose memory they wished to revere. 
So we, in these later days, have our Charistia, and, like the Romans, 
we do well to hold in memory the forefathers who gave us this pre- 
cious heritage. But we do ill if we stop there; if we do not, as has 
been told us this afternoon, strive and see to it with a settled pur- 
pose that the men whom we see around us are inculcated with the 
idea of better citizenship, that the idea of American institutions is 
further advanced, and that the starry banner we see around us here 
to-day is ever unfurled for their defense. If we do not do that, we 
are recreant sons of noble sires. If we do that, then are we the true 
Sons of the American Revolution. (Prolonged cheers.) 

President Trumbull : It is plain that patriotic utter- 
ances only grow in force as the hour grows later. I have 
now the honor to call upon the Hon. Edgar M. Warner, 
of Putnam, a town named for that good old general 
whose name more than all others thrills the hearts of 
the Connecticut Sons of the Revolution. 

MR. WARNER. 

Mr. President, Sons and Daughters of the Revolution: It is cer- 
tainly an honor, and an honor which I most heartily appreciate, to be 
called upon to say a word for the grand old hero of the state, Israel 
Putnam. In addition to that, Mr. President, it is peculiarly agree- 
able to me to be called upon by you whom I recall in my residence in 
this city with very great pleasure, and to greet here to-day and in 
this meeting so many of my old friends whom I hold in the highest 
esteem. Not one word, sir, that has been said of the history of Nor- 
wich should be modified in any respect. Every word of it is true, and 
every person who ever lived here, I believe, looks back with great 
pleasure to that residence. And now what of that grand old hero 
of Putnam? Of Putnam? Yes, because it was on account of his 
grandeur, and on account of his heroism, and on account of his lead- 
ership, that that very energetic and thriving and patriotic town of 
which I am now a resident took his name. I believe, sir, that more 
than to any other one thing the town of Putnam owes its prosperity, 
owes its reputation, and owes the spirit of its people to that name 
which it took in the days of 1850. It has grown to be so strong that 
we are coming to the legislature this year for a city charter, and we 
confidently expect to get it. And now I want to say a word as to the 
growing sentiment of the children of the old town. This morning I 



I02 

asked a little girl of six years who George Washington was, and 
she very promptly replied, " George Washington was the first Presi- 
dent of Putnam." (Much laughter.) If that is not patriotic, what 
is it? 

Joking aside, Mr. President, I believe most sincerely and heartily 
in the sentiments which have been expressed here. I believe in this 
organization, and I believe that it ought to execute, ought to investi- 
gate, ought to publish, and ought to carry into effect the spirit of '76 ; 
and it is because you and I and others who ought to have regarded 
these sentiments, who ought to have regarded that spirit, who ought 
to have dared to go to the polls every time, who ought to have stood 
up and be counted every time on every public question — I say it is 
because we have not done this that the present state of public affairs 
exists, and it is at our door that much of the blame should be laid, 
and nowhere else. We have no right to say to anybody in the State 
of Connecticut that public affairs are wrong. It is our fault that they 
are wrong. Let me ask, have we every time within these last ten 
years done our full duty at the caucus? Have we had anything to 
say in any way as to who should be nominated to represent us in the 
legislature? If not, why not? Was it the spirit of " old Put" that 
actuated our bosoms in public affairs? No, gentlemen, I think it 
could not have been. One lesson may be drawn from the character 
of the man whose birthday we are to-day celebrating. General and 
President Washington was first and pre-eminently a citizen, strenuous 
always in the performance of every duty incumbent upon him in that 
capacity. In this respect his record presents an example which 
should be followed by every true American. No man can be a true 
patriot who fails in the performance of his duty as a citizen. If it be 
true, as some allege, that we are suffering a marked decline in our 
political morality, boding ill for the future of the republic, the fault 
is not so much with those who are faithless and incompetent in office 
as it is with the people themselves, who neglect or are faithless to 
their duties as citizens. In a country like ours, where no citizen is 
voiceless, no one can claim exemption from any event from which the 
body politic may be suffering. For any citizen to declare that poli- 
tics have become disreputable is to confess that they could only have 
become disreputable through the failure of reputable citizens to per- 
form their duty. There is no community and no party in which the 
disreputable element is not in a powerless minority so long as the 
reputable element does its duty and lives up to its responsibilities. 
Under our political system the party primary or the caucus is bound 
to be the primary source of good or bad government. It is here, 
therefore, that every good citizen who really desires to live up to his 
full responsibilities should invariably take a hand. A vote at the 
primary is of -equal if not of more importance than a vote at the polls; 



I03 

and it is a proposition that cannot be disputed that the citizen who 
fails to do his duty at the primary has no right to complain of any 
political evils from which he may be suffering. The remedy is in his 
own hands. If he will not use it, he cannot complain. 

There is one thing more which I want to say and that is in regard 
to the action of this society in preserving the memorials of those 
grand old days. They have done that which it seems to me we ought 
to be proud of. We have talked about the old flag, grand and 
glorious as it is, and we have had grand sentiments from the gentle- 
men from New Haven as to its floating over the public buildings, and 
I hope it will soon be the law that no other flag will ever float over 
any public building than the glorious old stars and stripes. (Pro- 
longed applause.) I will pledge myself to say a good word for that 
bill in the legislature whenever it comes up. I say that this is all very 
well, but I want to ask you to help, if you can, in one matter when you 
go home. I know that you will assist, for we are in earnest about it. 
The ladies — God bless them everywhere ! — are in earnest and are 
willing to help. The Faith Trumbull Chapter is in favor of the 
movement. I want you as far as you can to advocate it and help it 
along and insist upon it that the good old State of Connecticut shall 
do what it ought to do and what it is fairly and honestly bound to do 
— preserve Putnam's wolf den. (Loud applause.) There is a prop- 
osition before the legislature to buy the property upon which it is 
located, and it can be done very reasonably. 

A voice: At what price ? 

Mr. Warner: It is not to exceed $2,500 and it probably can be 
done for $2,000. The scheme that is now in progress (although it has 
not yet taken final shape, and if you gentlemen have any ideas on 
the subject we want them) is as follows: To purchase the property. 
The land upon which the den is located comprises about sixty or 
eighty acres. That can be bought and it ought to be bought. Per- 
sonally, I don't care whether you buy fifty acres or eighty — only buy 
it and then leave it alone, just as nature has kept it. Don't beautify 
it; don't landscape-garden it; but let it alone. Cut the brush, if you 
please, but don't, for heaven's sake, make it beautiful! Don't embel- 
lish the wolf's den, the only purpose being that it should hereafter be 
kept for a memorial ; that the grand forest should not be cut off and 
that the wolf's den should not be mutilated. That is the proposition, 
and I ask you, gentlemen, when you go home to see to it among your 
people that every representative to the General Assembly comes up 
there determined that the purchase shall be made. (Loud cheers, 
much applause.) 

President Trumbull; Gentlemen, there is still an- 
other guest here whom we all know and from whom we 



I04 

should all be delighted to hear, therefore I call upon 
Thomas E. Murphy to address this Society. 

President Trumbull was informed that Mr. Murphy 
had gone home. 

President Trumbull: I regret very much to hear 
that he is absent. He was modest enough to object to 
being called upon, but I hoped we should have a few 
words from him. As it is now time to adjourn, in 
accordance with our time-honored custom, we will close 
these exercises by singing America. 

" My country! 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of liberty, 

Of thee I sing: 
Land where my fathers died! 
Land of the Pilgrims' pride! 
From every mountain side 
Let freedom ring! " 



SCHOOL PRIZES. 

In further pursuance of the third article of our con- 
stitution, an appropriation was made, and a committee 
was appointed for offering prizes to pupils of schools of 
the State of Connecticut for excellence in original essays 
on revolutionary subjects. Whereupon the committee 
issued the following circular : 

TO SUPERINTENDENTS AND PRINCIPALS OF SCHOOLS 
IN CONNECTICUT: 

The Connecticut Society of Sons of the American Revolution 
offers prizes in money, amounting to One Hundred Dollars, to 
pupils in the schools of Connecticut for excellence in original essays, 
as follows : 

To pupils in high schools, for essays on The share of Connecticut 
in the War of the Revolution; one first prize of Twenty Dollars; 
six second prizes of Five Dollars each. 

To pupils in schools below the grade of high schools, for essays on 
Connecticut men of mark in the War of the Revolution (treated 
either collectively or individually); one first prize of Twenty Dol- 
lars; six second prizes of Five Dollars each. 



Essays competing for these prizes must not exceed 2,000 words in 
any case, and must be presented before the first day of March, iSgs^ 
as follows: 

Essays from schools in Hartford, to Mr. Joseph G. Woodward; 
Meriden, to Hon. H. Wales Lines; Norwalk, to Hon. Ebenezer J. 
Hill; New Haven, to Hon. Hobart L. Hotchkiss; Bridgeport, to Mr. 
Rowland B. Lacey; Norwich, to Major Bela P. Learned; New Lon- 
don, to Mr. Walter Learned. Other places east of the Connecticut 
river, to Mr. Jonathan Trumbull, Norwich; west of the Connecticut 
river, to Mr. Lucius F. Robinson, Hartford. 

Superintendents and principals of schools competing for these 
prizes are particularly requested: 

1. To present not more than seven essays from one school, unless, 
in their judgment, a larger number should be of sufficient merit to 
entitle them to the final judgment of the committee of award. 

2. To cause the full name and address of each competitor to be 
appended to his or her essay, with the name of the school of which 
he or she is a member. 

3. To cause the competitors distinctly to understand that each 
essay must be entirely the work of the competitor, and especially that 
no corrections or revisions of essays can be made by any person other 
than its author. 

The prizes will be awarded on the 19th day of April, 1895, the 
anniversary of the battle of Lexington. 

Jonathan Trumbull, ^ 

Joseph G. Woodward, [■ Committee. 

Lucius F. Robinson, ) 

Awards tinder this circular were made as follows : 

To pupils of high schools for essays on The Share of 
Connecticut in the War of the Revolution: 

The First prize of twenty dollars, to J. Moss Ives, of 
the Danbury High School. 

Second prizes of five dollars each, to Joseph Cooke 
Pullman, of the Bridgeport High School. 

Curtis Howe Walker, of the Hopkins Grammar School, 
New Haven. 

Ray Morris, of the Hopkins Grammar School, New 
Haven. 

Floyd H. Dusinberre, Forestville, of the Bristol High 
School. 



io6 

Emma Comstock Bonfoey, of the Hartford Public 
High School. 

Harry Davenport, of the Bridgeport High School. 

To pupils in schools below the grade of high schools: 

The First prize of twenty dollars, to Lawrence Augus- 
tus Howard, of the South School, Hartford, subject: 
.Nathan Hale. 

Second prizes of five dollars each to: 

Ruth A. Curtis, of the Second North School, Hartford, 
subject: An Unknowji Hero. 

Robert Shannon, of the Second North School, Hart- 
ford, subject: Nathan Hale. 

Joseph Hooker Woodward, of the South School, Hart- 
ford, subject: Benedict Arnold. 

Mildred E. Camp, of the South School, Hartford, sub- 
ject: Israel Putnam. 

Bessie E. LaPierre, of the Broadway School, Norwich, 
subject: William Williams. 

James J. Kavanaugh, of St. Rose's School, Meriden, 
subject: Nathan Hale. 

No more than fourteen prizes could be assigned, but be- 
5^ond that number the committee found that the follow- 
ing deserved Honorable mention, which was awarded: 

In the high school division: 

Helen Flora Newton, Woodbridge, of the Hillhouse 
High School, New Haven. 

Mark W. Norman, of the South Norwalk High School. 

George Ellery Crosby, Jr., of the Hartford Public 
High School. 

In the common school division: 

Helen S. Patitz, of the West District School, Meriden, 
subject: Captain John Couch. 

Phoebe Beale, of Grammar School No. 5, Berlin, sub- 
ject: Grandfather s Story. 



I07 

John J. McCabe, of St. Mary's Parochial School, New 
Hartford, subject: Nathan Hale. 

Mabel S. Vaughn, of the Broadway School, Norwich, 
subject: Nathan Hale. 

A formal certificate, signed by the President and Sec- 
retary of the society, was sent to each person to whom 
an award was made. 

More than one hundred essays came before the com- 
mittee of final award. These had been selected from 
the best in each school. The number of papers actually 
written was much greater, but how much greater cannot 
be known. Besides, the studies for many others never 
completed were doubtless begun. 

The essays bring to mind the observation of Goethe, 
that " The most valuable acquisition from history is the 
enthusiasm it excites." A spirit of fervid patriotism, 
especially noticeable in the papers coming from schools, 
and bearing names which indicated that the authors 
would never be eligible to membership in this Society, 
pervaded the whole. Hale was the favorite subject, and 
both versions of his last words became thoroughly 
familiar to the readers of the essays. 

It was well that these young ones of our Connecticut 
people should have love of country awakened by a con- 
templation of the sturdy courage and noble sacrifices of 
the men of the revolution, and it ought to bear fruit in 
a manhood that prefers the general well-being to parti- 
san success, the public good to private gain. 

J. G. WOODWARD, 

Historian. 
Hartford, May lo, 1895. 




ANNUAL MEETING, MAY ii, 1896. 

(Condensed). 



The Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society was held 
in Jewell Hall, Hartford, Monday, May ii, 1896. The 
meeting was called to order at 12.05 by President Trnm- 
btill. The business of the day was opened by prayer by 
the Chaplain, Rev. E. S. Lines. 

President Trumbull read his report for the year (see 
page in). The Secretary's report was read (seepage 117). 
The Registrar read his report (see page 120). The re- 
port of the Treasurer was read (see page 126), followed 
by the report of the Historian (see page 129). 

Mr. Morris, as Chairman, read the report of the Com- 
mittee on Necrology. 

These reports were accepted and ordered printed in 
the society's next book. 

Messrs. Chandler, Gay, Goodsell, Swords, and Gris- 
wold were appointed a committee to report nominations 
for officers for the ensuing year. 

The Committee reported as follows: 
For President, .... Jonathan Trumbull. 



Vice-President, 
* Secretary, 
Treasurer, . 
Registrar, . 
Historian, . 
Chaplain, 



* Mr. Cooley declined the nomination and Mr. Decius L. Pierson was elected Secretary 



Edwin S. Greeley. 
Charles P. Cooley. 
John C. Hollister. 
Hobart L. Hotchkiss. 
Joseph G. Woodward. 
Rev. Edwin S. Lines. 



I09 



Board of Managers: 

Frank B. Gay, . 
L. Wheeler Beecher 
Rowland B. Lacey, 
Jonathan F, Morris, 
Silas F. Loomer, 
Henry Woodward, 
Henry R. Jones, 
E. J. Doolittle, 
Zalmon Goodsell, 
Rufus W. Griswold, 
Franklin H. Hart, 
Edward D. Steele, 
B. Rowland Allen, 
Martin H. Griffing, 
Russell Frost, . 



Hartford. 
(Westville), New Haven. 
Bridgeport. 
Hartford. 
Willimantic. 
Middletown. 
New Hartford. 
Meriden. 
Bridgeport. 
Rocky Hill. 
New Haven. 
Waterbury. 
Hartford. 
D anbury. 
South Norwalk. 



(The Secretaries of Local Branches): 

William E. Chandler, 
W. M. Olcott, 
Charles A. Quintard, 
John M. Harmon, 
Frank J. Naramore, 
Ernest E. Rogers, 



New Haven. 

Norwich. 

Norwalk. 

Meriden. 

Bridgeport. 

New London. 



Delegates to the National Congress: 

H. Wales Lines, (at large), 
Everett E. Lord, . 
Morris B. BeardsVey, 
Stephen W. Kellogg, 
Charles P. Cooley, 
Edgar M. Warner, 
Samuel Daskam, 
Joseph F. Swords, 
Walter Learned, . 
Rufus S. Pickett, 

9 



Meriden. 

New Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

Waterbury. 

Hartford. 

Putnam. 

Norwalk. 

Hartford. 

New London. 

New Haven. 



no 

The report of the committee was accepted and these 
officers were duly elected. 

Reports were read from several of the branches. 

It was voted that the society defray the expenses of 
the President to the National Congress. 

Section i of Article Six of the Constitution was 
amended to read as follows, the amendment appear- 
ing in italics : 

"There shall be a Board of Managers whose duty it 
shall be to conduct the affairs of this society, which 
Board shall consist of the officers of this society, the 
delegates to the National society, the secretaries of the 
several branches of this society ex-officio and fifteen others." 

At 3.25 the meeting adjourned. 

CHARLES P. COOLEY, 

Secretary. 



wP 




PRESIDENT TRUMBULL'S ADDRESS. 



At the close of this seventh year of our existence as a 
society it is impressed upon me that our organization 
can no longer be called young. Though still healthily 
growing, it has reached an age which enables it to take 
its place among the numerous organizations of the day 
as one which has long since proved the reason for its 
existence. These seven years have enabled us to define 
and appreciate the purposes for which we are organized, 
the work which we have accomplished, and the work 
which lies in the unbounded field before us. We may 
say, without the suspicion of an idle boast, that never 
before in its history has our society shown a member- 
ship so active, so united and so resolute in its purposes. 
The thinning of our ranks through lapsed memberships 
.and by the inexorable hand of death has been more than 
compensated by accession of new members, all of whom 
have, as I believe, sought their membership voluntarily, 
and by reason of their appreciation of its true meaning 
and value. It may safely be said that we have no luke- 
warm members, and that we may pride ourselves on an 
esprit de corps which promises well for our future. I be- 
lieve every member can say with me, to-day, that each 
added year of his membership has increased his attach- 
ment to the society and deepened his sense of the duty 
which forms the pleasure of membership. 

The leading events in our record of the past year will 
be reported to you in detail by our historian. Of these 
events the most important are the erection of a tablet at 



112 

Beacon Hill commemorating- the defense of New Haven; 
the annual dinner at Waterbury, and the distribution of 
prizes to pupils in the schools of our state for essays on 
subjects connected with the Revolution. Much credit 
is due the David Humphreys branch of New Haven for 
the brilliant and admirably planned exercises at the 
unveiling of the tablet, and to our members in Water- 
bury for their excellent and well executed arrangements 
for the largest annual dinner our society has yet held. 
The offer of prizes for essays in our schools brought out 
a full and interesting competition from various parts of 
our state, and more than ever impressed your commit- 
tee with the importance of this feature in our annual 
work, disseminating the spirit of patriotism in the com- 
ing generation, and encouraging in our schools a healthy 
rivalry not only among- the pupils but among the 
teachers and others who have charge of our educa- 
tional systems and methods. This second award of 
school prizes having convinced us of their importance 
as a feature in the legitimate work of our society, it 
seems unnecessary to recommend that the award should 
be made an annual one, and I might even suggest that 
a by-law^ be adopted to establish the custom. 

It is with much satisfaction that I inform you that on 
the 17th of next June we shall place in the war office at 
Lebanon a handsome bronze tablet indicating the 
character and history of the building, and recording the 
names of some of the leading patriots of the Revolution 
whose presence and counsels within its walls have ren- 
dered the building famous and hallowed its history. It 
has been decided by our Board of Managers that the 
unveiling of this tablet shall be made the occasion for a 
meeting of our society at Lebanon, and that appropriate 
exercises shall be held to celebrate the event. Prelimi- 
nary arrangements for this are now in progress. A 
committee from our society has already met a number 
of the leading citizens of Lebanon, and has found them 
much interested in the proposed plan, and heartily dis- 



TI3 

posed to do all in their power in furtherance of the 
success of the celebration. 

It is now five years since our society took formal pos- 
session of this historic building, during which interval 
little or nothing has been done to manifest our interest 
in our ownership and in the sacred trust]it involves. It 
is believed that a large number of our members and of 
the kindred patriotic societies will, be attracted to Leb- 
anon at the time fixed for the celebration; and it will 
be the aim of the committees to make the event inter- 
esting, although the program may not be as elaborate 
as that of five years ago. Due notice will be sent to 
each member of the society regarding the programme 
and the facilities for reaching and leaving the place. 

It should be remembered that our society has 
interested itself in the movement now in progress to 
preserve the Putnam wolf den at Pomfret. An asso- 
ciation for this purpose has been formed and incorpo- 
rated, and an appropriation of two hundred dollars has 
been voted by our Board of Managers for membership 
in this association. This historic locality can be secured 
at a moderate price and preserved and kept in its orig- 
inal condition at a small outlay. The brave conduct 
of our revolutionary hero at this place in his younger 
days is so well authenticated, and so familiar to the 
present and the rising generation that all his heroic 
acts during the campaigns in which he was engaged 
seem like lineal descendants of his deed at the Pomfret 
wolf den. It is believed that our society will take pride 
in its share of this work in honor of the Connecticut 
hero who ''dared to lead where any dared to follow." 

The affairs of our state society have made such 
demands upon the time and energies of your president 
that he had found it impossible to attend the annual 
congress of the National society, and has been obliged 
to limit his relations with that body to such official cor- 
respondence as has occurred with the general officers 
and the members of other state societies during the 



114 

year. Your attention is particularly called to the fact 
that the subject of uniting our National society with the 
general society of Sons of the Revolution has been 
interesting the various state societies of both orders. 
At the annual meeting of the general society of Sons 
of the Revolution at Savannah, resolutions were 
adopted looking to the accomplishing of this union, and 
inviting our National society to concur. Without hav- 
ing seen the text of these resolutions I can only inform 
you that they were, as reported to me, met at our 
National congress with a manifest intention to do 
everything within the power of our National society to 
accomplish the union. The sentiment of our Connecti- 
cut society upon this important question has always 
been, and I believe still is strongly in favor of the pro- 
posed union. Our record shows that we once took the 
lead in a distinctly outlined plan to accomplish this 
object, and were in no way responsible for the fail- 
ure of that plan, more than two years ago. During this 
interval no opportunity has offered for the renewal of 
these negotiations on the part of our society, and 
though under the circumstances we have been placed in 
a position where it would be unbecoming and probably 
useless for us to take the initiative in such renewal, I 
feel no doubt that we may be counted upon, as a society, 
to do all in our power to further any feasible plan for 
union, and to unite ourselves with a general order 
which never should have been divided into two fac- 
tions, but should work in harmony throughout our 
entire country under one general organization, as sim- 
ple in form as possible. 

In looking forward to the field for work in pursuance 
of the purposes for which we are organized, I must call 
your attention to the fact that our attempt to secure an 
appropriation from the state for the erection of a tab- 
let marking the birthplace of Nathan Hale was unsuc- 
cessful. This, however, should be no reason with our 
society for abandoning this project. It is to be hoped 



IIS 

that during- the year before us our own finances may be 
in a condition to enable us to place a suitable memorial 
upon the place where one of Connecticut's noblest and 
purest patriots was born, thus substantially testifying 
to our gratitude and reverence for the life and deeds of 
one whose devoted self-sacrifice forms so shining an 
instance of true and patriotic heroism. 

It is to be hoped, also, that the coming year may see 
good progress in the important work of locating and 
permanently marking the graves of revolutionary sol- 
diers and patriots throughout our state. This work has 
already been faithfully begun by the General David 
Humphreys branch of New Haven, about seventy 
graves having been located and annually decorated by 
that branch. It is also hoped to make the decoration of 
such graves as may be found at Lebanon a part of the 
exercises of June 17. We are fortunate in having in 
our society a member, Mr. Everett E. Lord, whose taste 
and skill have already been freely devoted to the 
designing and modeling of the two tablets which our 
society has erected, and the one which we propose to 
erect on the 17th of June. To him also we look for a 
design for some permanent device for marking the 
graves of revolutionary soldiers and patriots, which 
design we hope he may be able to complete for use dur- 
ing the present year, though we feel that, in view of all 
he has done for us in work of this kind, we are expect- 
ing from him more than we have a right to expect from 
any one member. 

We are fortunate in having had on our board of offi- 
cers during the year a secretary, registrar, treasurer 
and historian who have faithfully and accurately dis- 
charged the duties of their respective offices, some of 
which are onerous and exacting, and none of which can 
be called a sinecure. The task of editing our year 
book for 1893 and 1894 was also a most important and 
onerous duty faithfully performed by Mr. Gay and Mr. 
Bates, under peculiarly perplexing and delaying cir- 
cumstances. 



ii6 

Although I have particularly mentioned the excep- 
tionally important work which has devolved upon a few 
of our members, I feel that I cannot close this annual 
report without a grateful acknowledgment of the uni- 
form support and encouragement which I have always 
received from the members of the society at all times, 
relieving me of unsupported responsibility, and encour- 
aging me in the constant belief that the harmony and 
singleness of purpose which are the vital elements of 
our success have not and will not fail us in the future. 




REPORT OF SECRETARY. 



Hartford, May ii, 1896. 

Connecticut Society Sons of the American Revolution: 

The year past has seen little net gain in our member- 
ship. Losses by death, resignation, transfer to other 
state societies, and suspension for non-payment of dues, 
have reduced the gross gain of one hundred and forty- 
five to a net gain of about seventy-five. 

The Board of Managers has held ten meetings during 
the year, four at New Haven, five at Hartford and one 
at Waterbury. 

A large number of new members have been elected 
from New London and from Waterbury, and a branch — 
The Nathan Hale Branch, No. six — has been organized 
at New London. 

The society now has 888 active members * though the 
numbered membership reaches 1133. The society book 
for the years 1 893-1 894, which was issued during the 
summer, is most satisfactory, artistically as well as from 
the point of its usefulness. 

The exercises at the dedication of the tablet at Fort 
Wooster Park, New Haven, in July, were most interest- 
ing, and the plans for the entertainment of members of 
the society who attended were complete and well car- 
ried out. 

The New York society extended, as usual, invitations 
to the members of the Connecticut society, to attend 



* Seventeen members have been restored since this report. 



ii8 

the annual dinner of the Empire State society. Of 
this invitation about twenty or thirty of our members 
availed themselves. 

About two hundred and fifty members attended the 
annual banquet February 226., at Waterbury. 

It is to be regretted that train arrangements are 
such that it is inconvenient to have these banquets in 
many cities in the state. It would seem advisable here- 
after to have the banquets at some central city where 
railroad facilities are ample and where the difficulties 
of preparing for the large number at dinner will be 
lessened. 

The committee appointed to make the award of 
prizes for essays written in the competition open to 
the school children of the state, has made its report 
and the prizes have been distributed. The assigned 
topics for the essays were, for high schools, " The Con- 
tinental Congress;" for grammar schools, " Burgoyne's 
Invasion." 

This competition is a most worthy object for the ener- 
gies of the society. It cannot help but disseminate a 
better knowledge of the history of the nation among 
the children. It is not improbable that the study of the 
sacrifices which our ancestors made and the reasons 
which prompted them in their struggle for liberty may 
inspire in these children a deeper love for and pride in 
their country. If we can make them see that it is a 
noble thing to efface self that principle may live, we 
shall indeed be doing a work which makes the society 
worthy of existence, for we shall be teaching them 
patriotism. We want to reach and we do reach the 
children of foreign-born parents, and the influence 
which the study of American History must have upon 
them must be good, as we hope it will be far-reaching in 
its effect. 

About two hundred and fifty certificates of member- 
ship have been issued from the National society to 
members during the past year. 



119 

With our large membership the offices of Registrar 
and Secretary are becoming burdensome. In view of 
this the Board of Managers has voted each of these 
officers compensation of $150. 

With this, the close of the year, the present Secretary 
retires from office. He hopes his services have been 
acceptable and that the society may have gained some- 
thing from his official connection with it. He acknowl- 
edges gladly that the connection has been a profitable 
one to him in many ways. The friendship and respect 
which the officers and Board of Managers have shown 
him is appreciated, and he feels it is a duty as well as a 
pleasure to congratulate the society upon its officers. 
The idea that the Sons of the American Revolution is a 
patriotic society, a society for the cultivation of patriot- 
ism among its members and the people of this country 
has been the idea upon which your officers have worked. 
I am sure no thought of personal aggrandizement has 
actuated any plan proposed by the officers for the soci- 
ety's work. They have expended time and thought not 
that they might hold the society in their debt but that 
the people of this state might see that the members of 
this society honor their ancestors for what they did 
for us. 

Let us show that the heritage of our fathers is not 
dishonored. Let our purpose be to work for God^ for 
Country and for Home as theirs was, so that not alone by 
accident of birth but because we earnestly desire to be 
truly loyal citizens of the United States we shall show 
ourselves worthy to be called Sons of the American Rev- 
olution. Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES P. COOLLY, 

Secretary. 



^3 


6f^ 


^^ 


^^P 


^^ 


s 


1 


1 


m 








1^^ 




vp-^ims> 


f^PfS 


gPI 


^g^iiu^ 


^ 


^ 



REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



May II, il 



In July, 1895, the former Registrar, Mr. Frank B. Gay, 
having found it impossible to continue the office, the 
subscriber consented, at the request of the Board of 
Managers, to temporarily assume the duties. I am 
frank to say, however, that had I fully appreciated the 
demands upon the time of the occupant of this position, 
I should have longer hesitated about accepting. It is 
one which, in my opinion, could be held to the best 
advantage by some person who has an official connec- 
tion with a large library. 

Few appreciate the constant demands upon the offi- 
cers of a society numbering, as this does, nearly one 
thousand members. It may generally be supposed that 
the principal duty of the Registrar is the examination of 
applications for membership. This is, indeed, perhaps 
the most important duty that he has to perform, but by 
no means takes the most of his time. It would be a 
matter of gratification if every member of the society 
would read and act upon the suggestions which follow, 
which suggestions, I am sure, will be appreciated by 
every former Registrar. 

Many applicants seem to have the least possible idea 
of the requirements for membership, or, having that 
idea, equally fail to conceive the limitations of the 
society. They evidently have the impression that all 
that is, or at least all that should be, required, is their 



121 

assertion that some ancestor served in the war of the 
Revolution, even when this assertion is based only upon 
family tradition. In some instances applications have 
been forwarded containing nothing but the genealogy, 
with the general allegation of service sworn to, with no 
particular service specified, and with no reference to 
any record of service. In one instance the applicant 
claimed a service without any proof, and upon it being 
suggested to him that proof was required, expressed 
some indignation that his word was not sufficient, espe- 
cially as a relative had, as he claimed, been admitted 
to the " Daughters of the American Revolution " with- 
out any proof being required other than her state- 
ment. 

In other instances applicants think it advisable to 
mix up the services of the ancestor in the Revolution, 
with an account of pretty much all his doings, from boy- 
hood up, so far as the same can be proved or guessed at; 
and not only the acts and doings of the ancestor, but 
those of many of his relatives, in matters of family 
interest, but not at all connected with the Revolution- 
ary War. In one instance, the only allegation of ser- 
vice was contained in three lines. These were followed 
by closely-written matter which covered the entire 
blank, giving family history certainly of no value to 
this society. 

While the book published by the state, containing a 
list of the soldiers from Connecticut, is exceedingly 
valuable, and in fact almost indispensable, it has been a 
source, at the same time, of no slight trial to the nerves 
and patience of the Registrars. It is quite a favorite 
method of applicants, finding the name of an ancestor 
appearing several times in this book, to claim the ser- 
vice of every such person whose name is so found, with- 
out regard to the probabilities, or even possibility of 
there being several of the same name; or whether the 
persons who rendered the service were from the ances- 
tor's locality; or whether the services stated covered 



122 

concurrently the same period of time; thus leaving it 
for the Registrar to verify, if he can, the service of any 
one of the parties named with that of the ancestor of 
the applicant. In one instance of this kind the appli- 
cant stated four different services which he claimed to 
have been rendered by his ancestor, and cited various 
family and other records as proof. The Registrar spent 
two hours with him, going over his proofs, and thought 
he had convinced him that by no possibility could his 
ancestor have rendered more than one of the services 
claimed. The facts connected with this one service 
were submitted to the Board of Managers, and the appli- 
cation was approved. Shortly after, application was 
presented in behalf of the son of this applicant, and it 
was a little surprising that the application of the son 
contained all the claims and all the references of the 
father's application, which the Registrar was flattering 
himself he had shown to be without proof. 

Prior to the dinner held in Waterbury last February, 
a large number of applications was received from that 
vicinity, nearly every one of which had to be returned 
to have omissions supplied or proofs furnished. 

These suggestions are made, not in a grumbling or 
fault-finding spirit, but simply to show what a vast 
amount of labor could be saved the Registrar if appli- 
cants would pause to think that the value of member- 
ship in the society depends upon the thoroughness of 
proof of identity and service, and if they would confine 
the allegations of service to a brief statement, authenti- 
cated by some reference to a record to which the Regis- 
trar may have access, remembering that a reference to 
^'well authenticated family tradition " (a favorite one), 
is somewhat difficult to examine. 

It is like a ray of promise to receive an application 
submitted by one who has held the office of Registrar, or 
by the veteran member of the Board of Managers from 
Bridgeport, and some others of experience, as in such 
cases it can pretty surely be assumed that they are in 



123 

proper form, with references which will enable a speedy 
.and satisfactory examination and approval. 

The delay in issuing- the last year-book, which 
brought the record down to May i, 1894, together with 
the expense of publishing and distributing to the mem- 
bers, caused the Board of Managers to pass a vote in the 
fall of 1895, to issue this book but once in two years. A 
committee on publication was appointed, of which the 
present Registrar is a member. This book will contain 
the record of membership down to the first of May, 
1896. It cannot be begun, however, until all the applica- 
tions down to that time are recorded. 

The recording of applications is no slight matter. 
The Registrar is provided with a book containing 500 
blanks similar to the application blanks. After an 
applicant is elected and has paid his dues, the application 
is recorded in this book, the genealogy being given com- 
plete, with a record of such services of the ancestor as 
the Registrar finds proved. The fact that so many of 
the claims of applicants are not found proved renders 
it a necessity that the Registrar should personally make 
this record, as only he can pick out of the various claims 
made, those that he finds authenticated. This again 
illustrates the amount of work which might be saved 
the Registrar, if applicants would only make such claims 
of service as can be properly proved. 

My predecessor was delayed in completing the record 
so that he could not hand the books over to me before 
January, 1896, so that, in addition to the examination of 
a large number of new applications, there had then to 
be sifted out and recorded as above stated, all the appli- 
cations which had accumulated since July, 1895. Such 
recording is now in progress, but will delay somewhat 
the active work upon the book to be published, which, it 
is hoped, will be ready to be issued and distributed by 
next fall. 

It has been my purpose to send duplicates to the Reg- 
istrar General at Washington, so that the certificates 



124 

could be issued as promptly as possible. About the first 
of October, 1895, the duplicates of applications then in 
the hands of Mr. Gay were sent to Washington, which 
included the state numbers down to 1032. Since that 
time, 10 1 duplicate applications have been sent, includ- 
ing state number 1133. All these applications were 
approved by the Registrar General. There still remain 
to be forwarded, the applications approved in April, 
1896, and those approved before, where members have 
paid their fees and dues since April ist, 1896. f All these 
will be included in the year-book. 

The total number of members admitted since the last 
Registrar's report. May 10, 1895, who have paid their fees 
and dues, is one hundred and forty-five. Of these, one 
hundred and forty-four were active members, and one 
honorary member. One hundred and eight were admit- 
ted as descendants of Connecticut ancestors, and thirty- 
seven as descendants of ancestors who served from other 
states. Fifty-five members have been dropped from the 
roll by the Board of Managers for non-payment of dues. 
Thirteen members have died, so far as appears from 
notices sent to the necrologist. The present member- 
ship is eight hundred and eighty-eight * active members 
and forty-seven honorary members. 

Let not what has been said lead anyone to suppose 
that the office of Registrar is to be shunned on account 
of the labors connected with it. To a person who has 
the time and interest in the direction of the examina- 
tion of records connected with the Revolutionary War, 
with facilities for such research, it must be a pleasant 
duty to verify the services of those who took part in 
that great struggle, and to make a record which must 
grow in value and importance as a matter of history. 
This society is exemplifying and elaborating all pres- 
ent known records of the services of many of the sol- 



+ These have since been sent, and make the approved membership to May lo, 
1896, 1150. 

* Seventeen were reinstated after the annual meeting. 



12 



diers of the Revolution. In many instances, we are 
making, so far as the public is concerned, original 
records. In doing this private manuscripts and proofs 
are being brought to light, and by us they are being 
placed where the facts they contain cannot be wholly ob- 
literated. With each generation, these proofs become 
harder to verify, and with each year our records, which 
have been made with such care, will become more valua- 
ble; and each one of us who has given any time or 
attention to the work of this society cannot but be 
gratified, not only with the enthusiasm shown by its 
members, but from the fact of its patriotic purposes, 
and the record we are making and preserving of the 
Seeds of those whom we are proud to call ancestors. 

During the year, two "true sons" were admitted: 
Roger W. Newton of Durham, aged eighty-six, son of 
Abner Newton, also of Durham; and George W. Payne 
of Unionville, aged eighty-one, son of John Payne of 
Sag Harbor, Long Island. 

Few duplicates of the first three hundred members 
are on file in Washington. By vote of the Board of 
Managers, duplicates of all such applications are being 
prepared by the Registrar, to be forwarded to the Regis- 
trar General. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HOBART L. HOTCHKISS, 

Registrar^ 




lO 




TREASURER'S REPORT. 



JOHN C. HOLLISTER, Treasurer, in account with The Con- 
necticut Society Sons of the American Revolution. ^ 

1895. Dr. 

May 10, Balance from old account, $1,304.52 

July 31, Charles P. Cooley, sec, on account of dues, . 1,286.40 
Charles P. Cooley, sale of postage stamps and 

rosettes, 13.50 

1896. 
Jan. 24, Charles P. Cooley, membership fees and dues, . 424.92 
Charles P. Cooley, sale of buttons and badges, , 23.00 
Charles P. Cooley, sale of envelopes, . . 6.54 
May 2, Charles P. Cooley, membership fees and dues, . 522.86 
Charles P. Cooley, sale of buttons and stamps, . 38.73 
Charles P. Cooley, sale of year books and man- 
ual 5.50 



,625.97 



1895. Cr. 
June 19, The Hartford Engraving Co., engraving photo- 
graphs, $36.00 

25, Everett E. Lord, tablet expenses Fort Wooster 

Park, 73.40 

July 5, Charles P. Cooley, badge for Mr. Gay, . . 9.00 

31, Charles P. Cooley, school prize expenses, . . 3.80 

Charles P. Cooley, postage, 46.60 

Charles P. Cooley, four dozen rosettes, . . 12.00 

Charles P. Cooley, clerk hire, .... 3.00 

Charles P. Cooley, dues returned, paid by error, 2.50 



T27 



July 31, 



Aug. 3. 

24, 

Sept. 4, 

6. 



19, 



Nov. 9, 



Charles P. Cooley, check of O. H. Risley, re 

turned, 

Charles P. Cooley, certificate for J. B. Cone, 
Charles P. Cooley, rent of hall, May 10, 
Charles P. Cooley, Tiffany & Co., badges for J 

C. Hollister and R. B. Lacey, 
Isaac Garrison, care of war office, 
The Charles H. Elliott Co., letter heads. . 
C. W. Haskins. treas. general, 174 certificates, 
Jared B. Standish printing 1,200 Douglass por 

traits 

R. B. Lacey, distributing year book, . 

H. L. C. Stevens, portraits Martha and George 

Washington, 

The Hartford Printing Co. 



1896. 



Jan. 



18, 
23. 



31, 



Feb. I, 



6, 



Albert C. Bates, expenses for year book, 
Charles P. Cooley, sec, postage and express, 
Charles P. Cooley, buttons and badges, 
Charles P. Cooley, sundries, 
C. W. Haskins, treas general, thirty-six certifi' 

cates 

Joel Munsell's Sons, index, .... 
The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. , year book 
Frank B. Gay, registrar's expenses, 
W. H. Talcott, making register, 
Isaac Garrison, care of war office, 
20, The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 250 man 

uals 

Mch. 19, C. W. Haskins, treas. general, annual dues, 
C. W. Haskins, treas. general, 42 certificates, 
John A. Carpenter, appropriation Wolf Den As 

sociation 

Hobart L. Hotchkiss, registrar's expenses, 
Charles P. Cooley, school prizes, 
F. H. Cogswell, report of annual banquet, 
Charles P. Cooley, sec, postage and express, 
Charles P. Cooley, printing, .... 
Charles P. Cooley, buttons and stationery, 
Charles P. Coole5^ expenses of committee 

award school prizes, 

Treasurer, postage, 

Balance to new account, .... 



27, 

April II, 
23, 
25, 

May 2, 



to 



$3.00 

1. 00 

10.00 

18.00 
12.50 

5.85 
174.00 



10.80 
2.00 

75.00 
5450 



13-35 
28.11 
21.00 

5.35 

36 00 
5.00 
1,105.72 
34-60 
23.50 
12.50 

43-90 

21S.75 

42.00 

200.00 

16.75 
100.00 
16.10 
38.19 
21.25 
41.60 

16.05 

-50 

1,032.80 



I3.625.97 



128 



TRUMBULL TRUST FUND. 



Amount reported May lo, 1895, $i73-93 

Interest on deposits, 7.00 

Amount of deposit, New Haven Savings Bank, . . $180.93 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND. 

Amount reported May 10, 1895, $69.38 

Interest on deposits, 2.78 

Amount on deposit, New Haven Savings Bank, . . $72. 16 

May 7th, 1896. 
Audited and found correct. 



HOBART L. HOTCHKISS.j. ^^^^.^^^^ 

Franklin H. Hart, 





REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN. 



The General David Humphreys Branch of this society- 
unveiled, with appropriate ceremonies, at Fort Wooster 
Park, New Haven, on the fifth of July, 1895, a tablet, 
designed by Mr. Everett Edward Lord, bearing the 
inscription following : 

"ON THIS SPOT A SIGNAL BEACON 

WAS ESTABLISHED IN I775, 

AND ABOUT THIS HILL 

AMERICAN PATRIOTS 

BRAVELY RESISTED A LARGE FORCE 

OF INVADING BRITISH TROOPS, ' 

JULY 5, 1779. 

TO HONOR THE DEEDS OF THE FATHERS, 

THE CONNECTICUT SOCIETY 

SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

^-^ PLACED THIS TABLET, I895." 

SEAL, y 



An account of the ceremonies, which included ad- 
dresses by Messrs. Franklin Henry Hart, Edwin Seneca 
Greeley, Jonathan Trumbull, A. C. Hendrick, Orville 
Hitchcock Piatt, and Benjamin E. Brown, has been pub- 
lished by the General David Humphreys Branch in a 
handsome book of fifty-six pages. The book contains 
also an essay on TAe Invasion of New Haven, by Master 
Percy Arthur Whitmore, of the Washington School, to 
whom had been awarded the prize offered to pupils of 
the New Haven public schools for the best essay on 



I30 

this subject ; and A Sketch of the Life of General David 
Humphreys, by the Rev. Edwin S. Lines, 

The permanent form in which the record of the pro- 
ceedings has appeared supersedes a fuller account in 
this report. 



THE SEVENTH ANNUAL DINNER. 

The following gentlemen, who constituted the recep- 
tion committee, were the agreeable hosts of the mem- 
bers of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution at Waterbury, February 22, 1896 : 



Thomas D. Barlow, 
Charles F. Bronson, 
Henry S. Chase, 
Irving H. Chase, 
Charles S. Chapman, 
George H. Cowell, 
George A. Driggs, 
James S. Elton, 
John P. Elton, 
Henry L. Fowler, 
Edward L. Frisbie, Jr., 
William E. Fulton, 
Henry S. Gulliver, 
Paul D. Hamilton, 
Edward S. Hayden, 
Merritt Heminway, 
Charles H. Holmes, 
Walter W. Holmes, 

Charles 



T. R. Hyde, Jr., 
Robert W. Hall, 
George E. Judd, 
Stephen W. Kellogg, 
John P. Kellogg, 
William B. Merriman, 
Frederick B. Rice, 
Henry L. Rowland, 
Herbert S. Rowland, 
Gordon Russell, 
J. Richard Smith, 
Edward S. Smith, 
Ralph H. Smith, 
Frederick A. Spencer, 
Mark L. Sperry, 
Edward D. Steele, 
Albert S. Upson, 
Dr. C. W. S. Frost, 
P. Kellogg. 



The dinner was served at the City hall, which, under 
the {supervision of a committee of which Mr. F. B. Rice 
was chairman, had been handsomely decorated with 
streamers, shields and festoons. The American band 
furnished music. 



At 1.30 p. m. President Jonathan Trumbull called the 
assemblage to order and said : Members of the Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, you will now 
come to order and give your attention while grace is 
said by our chaplain, Rev. E. S. Lines, of New Haven. 

PRAYER. 

Almighty God, we thank Thee for Thy goodness to us 
as a people, and to us in our homes. We thank Thee for 
the memory of the fathers which comes to us this day; 
and we pray Thee that we may be found worthy to 
stand in their places. We ask for a continuance of Thy 
favor toward us, and all through Jesus Christ our Lord 
Amen. 

$$e QJlenu. 

OYSTERS, 
BLUE POINTS ON HALF SHELL. 

SOUP. 
MOCK TURTLE. 

FISH. 
SALMON, WINE SAUCE. 

ME A TS. 

BEEF A LA MODE, MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

BROWN MASHED POTATO. 

ENTREES. 

SWEET BREAD CROQUETTES, FRENCH PEAS. 

CHAMPAGNE PUNCH. 

GAME. 

LARDED PARTRIDGE, CURRANT JELLY. 

SARATOGA CHIPS. CHICKEN SALAD. 

DESSERT. 

ICE CREAM AND ICES. ASSORTED FANCY CAKES. 

SALTED ALMONDS. CONFECTIONERY. 

COFFEE. 
CRACKERS. CHEESE. 



132 

At 4 p. m. President Trumbiill again rapped for order, 
and was greeted with great applause. 

President Trumbull : I feel that I have been in a 
measure monopolizing this beautiful array of flowers 
which I see before me, in which the bloom of nature is 
woven into our national colors of red, white and blue, 
which emulates, although it cannot rival, the donors. 
These flowers bear this inscription : " The officers of the 
Millicent Porter Chapter of the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution send greetings to the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, assembled at Waterbury, February 22, 
1896." (Great applause.) I am informed that before it was 
finally decided to hold this seventh annual meeting of 
our society at Waterbury, the city promptly prepared 
itself, as another city had done before, by the adoption 
of a new charter, of a character sufficiently revolution- 
ary to be appropriate to this very auspicious occasion. 
Of the other admirable arrangements of this affair you 
have already had much more than a taste. It is partic- 
ularly fitting that I should now ask one of Waterbury's 
most honored citizens to place the Sons of the American 
Revolution as far as possible under the operation of the 
new charter here in our city hall. I therefore take 
great pleasure in asking Gen. Stephen W. Kellogg to 
assume the chair, and to manipulate the electric cur- 
rent of patriotism which thrills through this assembly. 
(Applause.) 

GENERAL KELLOGG. 

Mr. President, Our Honored Guests and Gentlemen of this 
Patriotic Society : I thank you, Mr. President, for the high honor 
of acting as toastmaster on this occasion. It is my pleasant duty, 
in the name and in behalf of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion resident in Waterbury, to extend to you, Mr. President, and 
to the officers of this society, to each of our distinguished guests, 
and to the members of this society, one and all, who are present, 
our most hearty and cordial welcome to this banquet and to 
the city of Waterbury. And if our whole city could be assembled 
here to-day, they would join us in this welcome, with a unity of 
acclamation that would ring through all our hillsides. You come 



from all parts of our good little state, from Thompson to Greenwich, 
and from Salisbury to Stonington, to celebrate this birthday of the 
great leader of our armies in the war of the revolution, and to revive 
the memories and traditions of the gallant men who fought its bat- 
tles, and went through a fearful baptism of fire and blood for seven 
long years, that they might leave to us, their children, the blessings 
of a free and independent government. Welcome, thrice welcome, 
to you, each and every one ! We trust you are satisfied thus far. We 
trust you are all feeling very comfortable at this hour. If Prof. A. 
W. Wright, of Yale, was here, and with this new and wonderful dis- 
covery in the art of photography, and with his Crooke tubes and 
cathode rays, would take a photograph of what is now going on 
inside of us, he might get out some very entertaining pictures for 
the New Haven Sunday Register of to-morrow. 

Gentlemen, the first toast is ''The Connecticut Soci- 
ety of the Sons of the American Revolution." There is 
just one man and one name that should be called for 
that toast, and that is the honored name home by the 
president of this society; the name of our great war 
governor, during the whole of the war of the revolu- 
tion, and on whom Washington leaned for help and sup- 
port throughout the whole war. I call on Jonathan 
Trumbull of Norwich, our esteemed president, to re- 
spond to this toast. (Applause.) 

JONATHAN TRUMBULL. 

Do not expect from me any adequate response to the sentiments 
which are inspired by the simple mention of the name of our society 
on Washington's birthday. These sentiments will. I know, pervade 
and animate all the patriotic utterances which are to follow, and will 
be all the more impressive as coming from the brilliant array of 
talent which your programme affords, and from voices less familiar 
to you than mine. 

1 only intend to present to you at this time my annual official greet- 
ing, a greeting which grows in significance 5^ear by year and which 
is particularly significant to-day in view of the fact that we have 
reached the golden number seven in our annual celebration of Wash- 
ington's birthday that we number 900 good men and sons of revo- 
lutionary lineage, and that we have never swerved from the pur- 
poses for which we are organized. It is because we are actuated by 
simple filial reverence for our ancestors and love for our country, 



134 

that we rally on this impressive anniversary in increasing numbers 
to honor the Father of his Country, and the father of the American 
revolution. 

Do not think it strange if I congratulate you more on what we 
have omitted to do, than on what we have done; on what we are 
not rather than on what we are ; for a view on the negative side of 
our society goes far towards defining its positive aims and purposes. 
Opportunities and even temptations to make itself ridiculous con- 
tinually beset a society like ours; and when I say that we have never 
yielded to these temptations or availed of these opportunities, per- 
haps I have said all that is necessary. Even if the time would allow 
me, I need hardly to specify the numerous measures, plans and 
absurd schemes which are constantly presented from sources outside 
of our own society, often with the best of misguided intentions, to 
our board of managers, garnished with patriotic adjectives and even 
containing menaces to the powers of Great Britain and continental 
Europe. 

In view of our avoidance of the adoption of such measures we are 
becoming more and more firmly convinced that we are not organized 
for the purpose of inaugurating a war of races or of religions in our 
land, or of establishing a new American aristocracy, or an open or 
secret boycott of any particular class, or even of fighting the British 
merely for the sake of emulating our ancestors, so long as the British 
behave themselves properly, as they appear inclined to do, in the 
matter of their American relations. 

Fortunately for us of Connecticut, there was preserved in the old 
Charter Oak of Hartford a royal ratification of a constitution which 
is to us a heritage of independence guided by conservatism, and of 
intelligence tempered by prudence, which the fathers of the revo- 
lution sacredly guarded, and which the sons of the revolution as 
sacredly guard to-day. If we seek for a reason of our successful 
avoidance of the dangers which beset us, it is in that heritage that 
we shall find it, teaching us that we alone are responsible for our 
acts, and that the responsibility is a grave one. 

When there is so much that we can do in the unbounded fields 
before us in pursuance of our legitimate purposes, and so much that 
we have already done, let uS take a new departure from this seventh 
celebration of Washington's birthday, determined that, under the 
inspiring influence of this memorable day, we shall make a new 
record which will surpass the old one. 

If the influence which our order exerts is a silent one, it is none 
the less potent for that reason. A single prize contest, for example, 
among the school children in our state for essays on subjects con- 
nected with the American revolution will go further towards Ameri- 
canizing our country than any antagonistic measures, secret or open. 



135 

I take pleasure in announcing to you that a contest for prizes 
amounting to $ioo offered by our society is now in progress among 
the school children in our state, and, being the second of its kind, I 
hope and expect that the contest will be an annual one. There is, 
too, another silent and equally potent influence in the memorial tab- 
lets which we are gradually erecting to mark historic events and 
places within our state, and in the preservation of such historic 
shrines as the Lebanon war office. 

And if these peaceful measures are not enough for men in whose 
veins courses the fighting blood of the revolution, let me point to a 
field for more aggressive work, which appears to be opening before 
us, and ask you to join hands with me in defending the good name 
of some of our revolutionary patriots against base insinuations, false 
charges and even libels which are appearing in the current literature 
of our day. It is, in some recent instances, becoming a serious ques- 
tion whether the cudgels we take up in this should be the figurative 
ones which pen and ink afford, or the more tangible ones which are to 
be found in the good old Connecticut hickory of our forests. When 
Israel Putnam is accused, as he has recently been, of cowardice and 
treachery, Connecticut Sons of the American Revolution will rally for 
his defense with cudgels of some description. I am happy to inform 
you that I have, as I believe, found sufficient evidence to hang the man 
who has uttered these gross libels against the memory of our grand 
old hero, if hanging is, as it should be, the penalty for such a crime. 
The only difficulty in the way of securing sentence and execution in 
this case appears to lie in the fact that Putnam's defamer has taken 
rope enough for the purpose, and has, as is usual in such cases, incon- 
tinently hanged himself. And thus, let us hope, may perish all tra- 
ducers of any revolutionary hero, whose fame and good name stand, 
like Israel Putnam's, tested by the calm judgment of history that 
has waited a century to be written. 

Taking a new impulse from this auspicious day, let us call our first 
seven years but a beginning and a faithful promise to future genera- 
tions that the memory of the patriots of the revolution will be 
sacredly guarded, and that the principles which they vindicated will 
always remain the watchword and standard of our organization. 

General Kellogg : Gentlemen, there is one toast 
that in all patriotic gatherings for nearly one hundred 
years has been uniformly drunk standing, and in silence; 
you will all therefore rise in your places and prepare for 
it. This toast is not on the list, but you all know what 
it is. Sons of the American Revolution, I give to you 
as a toast, ''The memory of George Washington." 



136 

The toast having been drunk with due reverence, 
General Kellogg addressed the assembly as follows : 

GENERAL KELLOGG. 

I am down in the Hst for a short speech; we are all going to make 
short speeches to-day. As I have the floor, I might as well make it 
now, though I admit it is taking a little advantage of the eloquent 
speakers along this table, whom you will all be delighted to hear. 
I have about the same advantage that a certain trial justice in New 
Haven, a generation or more ago, had on a certain occasion. That 
justice had the unfortunate habit of getting full pretty often, and 
sometimes he would be in that condition in the morning before court 
hour. The story is not quite apposite in this assemblage, for there 
is nobody full here, but I will tell it for all that. One morning he 
was unusually full, and a man was brought before him charged with 
drunkenness. He was convicted, of course; justices always convicted 
in those days, to save the town the costs. The man knew the justice 
very well, and he had become sober enough to see the condition the 
justice was in; and as the justice began to fill out the mitimus, the 
fellow leaned over the rail of the prisoners' box, and said: " Put 
your own name in, judge; you are the drunkest of the two." " That 
may be," replied the justice, peering over his spectacles; " but as I 
hold the pen, I think I will put your name in instead of my own." 
I recall another story, where a man had the advantage over his 
friends. During the war of 18 12 there was a threatened invasion of 
New London, as a British fleet was hovering off the coast near the 
east end of Long Island, The militia were called out in hot haste 
from a considerable portion of the state. I knew several men in 
Waterbury years ago who were in that bloodless campaign; but I 
am sure that the captain in the story did not hail from Waterbury. 
One evening a rumor went through the camp of one of the regiments 
that the British fleet was approaching, and that the enemy would 
certainly try to land the next day, and orders were given that the 
regiment must be ready to aid in the repulse of the enemy. The 
colonel had his regiment drawn up in line the next morning, and 
discovered that one of his captains was missing, and the lieutenants 
of the company could give no account of him. The colonel spied a 
suspicious-looking heap of earth in a distant corner of the field and 
rode out to it, and there he found his captain snugly ensconced in 
the bottom of a hole. " Get out of that," shouted the colonel. "Go 
away, colonel," answered back the captain, "you can't have this 
hole; this is my hole; I dug it myself last night." Well, that cap- 
tain could not have been a son of the American revolution; he must 
have been a son of one of the few tories Connecticut had in common 
with the other colonies. 



137 

Waterbury has no battlefields of the revolution and no special 
objects of historical interest, but she has a splendid record of the 
services of her sons in the revolutionary war. We are proud of our 
soldiers' monument, standing hard by the green, dedicated to the 
900 brave men, the living and the dead, who went forth from us to 
fight the battles of the union. That was about one in twelve or 
thirteen of our inhabitants. A history of Waterbury is now being 
published under the supervision and written in great part by the 
Rev, Dr. Anderson of this place; and if the state of Connecticut 
could find so able a historian for the state, it would get a better his- 
tory than we can expect to see. That part of the history relating 
to the war of the revolution and its causes was prepared and written 
by the Misses Sarah J. and Katharine Prichard of Waterbury, and a 
most interesting history they have made of it. Their industry and 
research have brought to light many important facts that were not 
generally known before. From that history it will appear that 
Waterbury, with a population of about 3,500, her territory then 
being much larger than it is now, sent into the war of the revolution, 
at different periods, nearly 700 men. That would be one in five of 
her population, showing that almost all the able-bodied men of the 
place took part in that war; and this simply illustrates the patriotism 
of all the towns in Connecticut in those days. The fact has been 
stated, over and over, that Connecticut sent more men into the field 
in the war of the revolution than any other state in proportion to its 
population. Professor Fiske says in his history that it was the 
boast of this sturdy little state, that she never suffered the enemy to 
sleep over night within her borders. Though exposed all through 
the war to invasion by the British troops from New York and 
repeatedly invaded, the enemy never stayed long upon her soil. 
Their advancing footsteps were still fresh when, in every instance, 
they were compelled to turn their backs to the patriotic little state ; 
and the light of the burning dwellings to which they had applied the 
torch, had not gone out, when they were forced to leave her borders. 

Tradition tells us that Washington stopped in the village of 
Waterbury once or twice when he went to Hartford to confer with 
his right hand man. Governor Trumbull, and the general of the 
French army. Tradition says that he tied his horse to a tree out 
here on West Main street, and took dinner with an Esquire Hop- 
kins, a leading citizen of the place. This Esquire Hopkins seems 
to have had the Yankee trick of inquisitiveness, as he questioned 
Washington, as the story goes, pretty closely at that time to see if 
he could find out something of what the operations of the army 
were to be. Washington, after hearing him for a while, asked, 
"Mr. Hopkins, can you keep a secret?" "I can," was the eager 
reply. " So can I," said Washington, and the conversation ended. 



138 

I crave the indulgence of this assembly while I speak for a few 
minutes of one distinguished soldier and statesman of the revolu- 
tion, who has hitherto escaped notice at the annual banquets of this 
society. While the names of Trumbull and Sherman, of Putnam 
and Nathan Hale, of Wooster and Ledyard and Knowlton and 
others have been as household words, as they deserve to be, the 
name I am about to mention has never been spoken at any of our 
annual feasts. Not even at the gathering at New London four 
years ago was his name mentioned, though that was the city of his 
residence at the outbreak of the war. The only allusion I find to 
him is the opening paragraph of the report of our historian in the 
last year book, as follows: 

"When Col. Samuel H. Parsons left New London in April, 1775, 
to ride across the country he did not know that he was likely to 
make history, and so did not write down all he did or saw." 

Yes, the young Samuel Holden Parsons was then wholly engaged 
in making history, not in writing it. The son of one of the most 
distinguished divines of the last century (the Rev. Jonathan Par- 
sons), a graduate of Harvard college, young Parsons opened a law 
office in Lyme, where his father had formerly preached. Lyme was 
then one of the principal towns in the colony, with a larger popula- 
tion than Hartford, and the home of some of the most distinguished 
men in the history of Connecticut. It may sound a little strange in 
the ears of many before me when I say that the iirst census of this 
state in 1790, under the constitution of the United States, shows 
that Middletown was then the largest town in the state, having a 
larger population than either Hartford or New Haven. Middletown 
and New London were the only towns of the state having a popula- 
tion of over 5,000 in the first census. Young Parsons rose rapidly 
in his profession. His ability as a lawyer was such that he was 
appointed king's counsel for the colony, causing his removal to New 
London. When the news came to New London of Lexington and 
Concord Bridge, that the embattled farmers had "fired the shot 
heard round the world," Parsons resigned his commission, closed his 
law office and started at once for the scene of war. But he rode by 
way of Hartford for a purpose. He knew that back in the wilder- 
ness, by the waters of Lake Champlain, the British had the forts of 
Ticonderoga and Crown Point filled with military stores, and his 
keen foresight saw that their capture before they could be rein- 
forced was of vital importance to the patriot cause. With Colonel 
Wyllys, Silas Dean and others, the capture was planned and the 
money procured from the treasury of the colony by giving their 
own notes or receipts. Parsons being the first to sign them. And three 
weeks after that, Ticonderoga was taken, at the demand of bluff 
old Ethan Allen, in the name of the great Jehovah and the Conti- 



139 

nental Congress. The British commander of the fort had doubtless 
heard of the first name, but the name of the Continental Congress 
was too much for him. That was a creature he did not understand ; 
he didn't know whether it went on four legs or six ; and so m the 
early gray of a glorious May morning he surrendered the fortress 
without a gun being fired, in his night robe and with a torch in his 
hand instead of a sword. And the taking of that fortress was of 
vital importance to the patriots' cause ; for they took a vast amount 
of military stores, powder and ball, and about 120 heavy cannon, 
besides a large quantity of small arms. The men swarming around 
Boston after the fight at Lexington and Concord Bridge were 
greatly in want of ammunition, and the stores of Ticonderoga and 
Crown Point were just what they needed. The art of making pow- 
der was then almost unknown in the colonies ; for the English gov- 
ernment had long discouraged and prevented the growth of any 
kind of manufactures in the colonies, and its policy was to make 
them entirely dependent on the mother country. As was said on 
the floor of Parliament, they would not allow the colonies to make 
even a hob nail or a horse shoe. But Connecticut men learned to 
make powder very soon; as well as to make cannon, from the tough 
iron of old Salisbury. There is a story that soon after the fighting 
at Lexington a patriotic man in Concord undertook to manufacture 
powder for the American army, and he thought he could make good 
powder. A barrel of his powder caught fire one morning; he seized 
a pail, ran ten rods to a spring for water, and got back in time to 
save half of it. And some of those heavy cannon, of which the 
colonists were almost ei*tirely destitute, were drawn by patriotic 
farmers from Ticonderoga to Washington's army around Boston ; 
and they were planted in the fortifications on Dorchester Heights, 
and compelled General Howe and the British army to evacuate Boston 
without a battle. Then, for the last time, the city of Boston gave 
shelter to a foreign foe, except when they came as prisoners of war, 
as did Burgoyne's army from the glorious field of Saratoga. 

Then for the last time the streets of Boston echoed to the march- 
ing tread of hostile battalions. 

But I return to the career of Samuel Holden Parsons. He was 
immediately appointed colonel of the Sixth regiment of Connecticut 
Volunteers. He knew nothing of the art of war, except what he 
had learned as a student of history, and some service in the Colonial 
militia ; he had it all to learn, like many of our bravest and best men 
in the late war of the rebellion. 

While we have been preparing for this banquet, news has come to 
us of the death at Washington of one of the oldest members of our 
society; a member of my own profession, whom I have known and 
esteemed for more than forty years. I refer to the late Jeremiah 



140 

Halsey. On referring to the year book, I find that the service of his 
ancestor was in the Sixth regiment of Connecticut Volunteers 
under Colonel Parsons. 

When the regular Continental army was organized by Washington 
from the volunteer forces, Parsons was appointed colonel of the 
Tenth regiment. He won his spurs upon the field, and the star of a 
general in the disastrous battle of Long Island the following sum- 
mer; holding with a small number of men a greatly superior force of 
the enemy in check, while the greater part of our army effected a re- 
treat, and when completely surrounded, he cut his way through the 
enemy instead of surrendering. He remained in the service through 
the whole war, till after the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. 
He became a major-general. He took Putnam's place after that 
glorious old veteran was obliged by age and broken health to leave 
the army; and the defense of Connecticut was especially intrusted 
to General Parsons. He was one of the judges on the trial of Major 
Andre as a sp3\ He received the thanks of Congress for his brilliant 
success in the battle of Morrisania, 

When the war was substantially ended with the surrender at 
Yorktown, General Parsons retired from the army and went to 
Middletown, where his wife and children had remained during the 
war, to resume the practice of law. He took his place in the front 
rank of his profession. HoUister in his " History of Connecticut," 
says of him that he " was one of the most heroic soldiers, as well as 
one of the best lawyers and most scholarly writers of the revolution- 
ary period." He was one of the leading delegates in the convention 
that was called to ratify the constitution of the United States, and 
it was upon his motion that the constitution was ratified by the state 
of Connecticut. He had already been appointed one of the judges 
of the great northwest territory then being organized; the most 
magnificent territory ever organized in the history of this govern- 
ment, comprising the present great states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 
Michigan and Wisconsin. But he waited till he could use all his 
influence and ability in bringing his dear native state, that he loved, 
into the glorious union for which he had so long fought; and then he 
went westward to the new star of empire, leaving his family behind. 
He was appointed by Washington chief justice of that vast territory, 
to which settlers from Connecticut and other New England states 
were then turning their eager eyes. A few months after, in the full 
strength and vigor of his manhood, he was drowned in endeavoring 
to cross a swollen stream on horseback, not far from the new settle- 
ment of Marietta, Ohio. 

The house in which General Parsons lived still stands in Middle 
town, on Main street by the lower green. It has always been owned 
and is still owned in the family. I have spoken of General Parsons 



HI 

for two reasons: that his name has not been mentioned before in our 
annual banquets, and that I feel a special interest in his history; for I 
know you will all generously pardon me when I say that my good wife, 
now attending the congress of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution at Washington, is a lineal descendant of General Parsons; and 
the blood of Samuel Holden Parsons flows in the veins of my children. 
I cannot find that the exact spot where General Parsons was buried 
is known. Tradition says that he was buried on the banks of the 
stream where he lost his life, but that country was then a wilderness. 
A desire to visit the graves of our fathers is an inherent trait even 
in savage nations, much more in civilized. In God's own acres at 
Arlington where lie the sleeping thousands for whom 

" The muffled drum's sad roll has beat 
The soldier's last tattoo," 

there is nothing more touching than the constant recurrence of white 
headstones with the simple, sorrowful word inscribed, " Unknown " 
General Parsons' case is like that of pur own Nathan Hale, for I sup- 
pose no one can tell the exact spot where he was buried. Both Gen- 
eral Parsons and Nathan Hale are like the great law giver of Israel: 
' ' They died and were buried and no man knoweth the place of their 
burial until this day;" and no man can know it, " until earth and 
sea shall give up their dead, and the multitude that no man can 
number shall stand before the great, white throne." 

Sons of the American Revolution, it is well to celebrate this 
honored day as the birthday of the Father of his Country. It is well 
to recall the deeds and heroism and the sufferings of all our ances- 
tors who pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, to 
insure through all time the blessings of liberty and a free govern- 
ment for their children. We celebrate the events of war. War is 
hell, as General Sherman once pithily said, and the expression was 
none too strong for the reality; and yet through its waste and de- 
struction the greatest good to the world has been often achieved. 
But so long as our flag shall float high over our land and over the 
sea, though rumors and threatenings of war may arise, let us hope 
and pray that this nation shall show to all the world that peace hath 
her victories no less renowned than war. And I would say of my 
country, as was said of old. Peace be within thy walls, O glorious 
heritage that our fathers left us, and prosperity in all thy borders; for 
my brethren and companions' sake, I would say, peace be with thee. 

After his address, General Kellogg introduced the 
next speaker as follows : 

Connecticut is called a pretty small state, as you 
know, but there is a state right east of us that is smaller 
II 



142 

than we are; that is, in territory. But in brains, and 
everything else that makes true manhood, it is one of 
the greatest states in the union. They used to say that 
the boundaries between Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island were about as uncertain as those between the 
English Colony and Venezuela, or the Schomburg line. 
I remember that Rufus Choate once said in a case 
involving the Rhode Island boundary, that it might as 
well have been bounded north by a blue jay, east by a 
swarm of bees, and west by 300 foxes with fire brands 
tied to their tails. (Laughter.) 

We have a professor from that little state, whom I 
shall have great pleasure in introducing; for he repre- 
sents 260 years of civil and religious freedom upon 
American soil, a lineal descendant of Roger Wil- 
liams, who settled Rhode Island 260 years ago. 
He comes from the state which gave us Nathaniel 
Greene, foremost in the war of the revolution, second 
only to Washington, as we all know. I have great pleas- 
ure in introducing to you for the next toast, which is 
*' Rhode Island in the American Revolution," Prof. 
Alonzo Williams, of Brown University. 

PROF. ALONZO WILLIAMS. 

Mr, Chairman, gentlemen, patriots and ladies: Allow me to ex- 
press to you, sir, my appreciation for the honor conferred upon me 
by your invitation to participate in these festivities. I have sat here 
and enjoyed these rich bounties of your board, sipping the spark- 
ling nectar, which kindly nature grants to all her children, and 
drinking in that more sparkling eloquence which the gods lend only 
to their favorite sons, and even more sparkling inspiration from 
these galleries about us, and I have been endeavoring to find w^ords 
suitable in which to clothe my sense of the appreciation and pleas- 
ure. At this moment, sir, I find myself in that embarrassing strait 
of the young Waterbury girl who was being examined for the posi- 
tion of school teacher, and, when asked what was the capital of 
Massachusetts, hesitatingly replied, " I don't remember." But, said 
the examiner, ingeniously and encouragingly putting what you 
might call a leading question, "Of what state is Boston the capi- 
tal?" "I know the answer to that," she said, " but I haven't the flow 
of language to express it." (Laughter and cheers.) 



H3 

I will say at the outset, lest perchance you may not know it, 
Rhode Island is a small state. Connecticut is a small state, but had 
you ridden with me since early dawn on the New England road, 
so fearfully and wonderfully made, along the rough and 
ragged edges of these two closely rubbing commonwealths, you 
would feel in your bones new accents to the joke, so long since copy- 
righted, to wit: " If Connecticut claims to be the Nutmeg state, 
then surely Rhode Island is the Grater." Rhode Island small ? The 
spirit of a loyal son of Rhode Island is the spirit of every true son 
of New England, when he modestly compares himself with fellow- 
citizens of vast empire states, a spirit so aptly illustrated by the 
story of the Sunday school boy whose teacher, after she had im- 
pressed upon him the Lord's care for all the works of His hands, 
"both great and small," asked the lad to give illustrations of the 
truths she had been inculcating, whereupon he declared himself as 
follows: " The Lord who made the mighty mountains made the ten- 
der blades of grass; the Lord who made the deep, wide ocean made 
the pebbles on the shore; the Lord who made me made a daisy." 
That's Rhode Island. 

But seriously, sir, Rhode Island is small. So was imperial Rome 
during the years of her proudest achievements. So was Athens, 
always. So was Macedon, so was Phoenicia, so was Palestine. But 
states are not measured by the league nor heroic achievements 
weighed by silver and gold, and Bethlehem in Judea was not least 
among the princes of Judea. 

What part did Rhode Island play in the mighty drama of the rev- 
olution, do you ask ? By what virtue is she entitled to a front seat 
at the symposium of commonwealths, when Massachusetts and New 
York and Virginia and Connecticut recite their deeds and tell the 
world how they prepared the nation and shaped its early destinies ? 
You ask for specifications. I will simply read the record, and that, 
too, without emphasis, for the record unadorned is enough to show 
that our colony assumed from the first a unique position, and that 
in more than one important crisis Rhode Island proved herself some- 
thing more than a peer of her sisters. Let us speak only of first 
things and endeavor to enumerate upon the fingers the matters of 
grave import connected with the revolution in which Rhode Island 
was first, jQQ., facile pri7iceps. 

I. Stamp act: In regard to the imposition of the iniquitous 
stamp act, Rhode Island was the first to declare in emphatic lan- 
guage by resolutions of the General Assembly, September i6, 1765, 
that in it alone was vested the sole right of taxation; absolved its 
citizens from obedience to the mandates of the act, and insured 
all its officers indemnity for disregarding the provisions of the 
same, resolutions which pointed thus early directly to an absolu- 



144 

tion of allegiance to the British crown, unless the grievances were 
removed. 

2. Virginia resolutions: Rhode Island was the first of the sister 
colonies to support the famous resolutions of the House of Burges- 
ses in Virginia, passed May i6, 1769, and approved by Rhode Island 
June 12, 1769; she had explicitly declared the same thing four years 
earlier. 

3. The Liberty: Rhode Island was the first to brave royalty in 
arms. Long before the famous Boston tea party, December 16, 1773, 
the people of Newport had sunk his majesty's armed sloop Liberty, 
which had brought into that port two Connecticut vessels on sus- 
picion of smuggling and had maltreated the captain of one of them. 
The people interfered, set free the Connecticut vessels, scuttled the 
Liberty and burned her boats. This was the first overt act of vio- 
lence offered to the British in America, and the date was July 19, 
1769. 

4. The Gaspee: Rhode Island spilled the first blood in the war 
for independence. Long before Lexington, April 19, 1775, of which 
so much has been justly said and sung, men of Providence, under 
the intrepid Whipple, had sent up the Gaspee in flames in the night 
of June 9-10, 1772; an affair the more deserving of commemoration, 
as it was the first blow in all the colonies for freedom, and the blood 
of Lieutenant Duddington was the first British blood spilled in the 
cause of independence. 

5. Continental Congress : Again the citizens of Providence, in 
town meeting assembled, May 17, 1774, was the first authorized 
body to recommend the establishment of a permanent Continental 
Congress. We grant this idea was common property, had been 
more than once suggested by the committees of correspondence 
not only of Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Virginia, but espe- 
cially of the Sons of Liberty of New York, to whom Mr. Bancroft 
credits the suggestion, and that it had been proposed in public 
addresses by individuals, as by John Hancock at a public meet- 
ing in Boston, March 5, 1774, but the town meeting of Providence 
was the first responsible body that formally adopted it, labeled 
it, made it its own, "what others dared to dream of, dared 
to do." 

6. Colonial navy : Rhode Island is the mother of the American 
navy. Commodore Abraham Whipple, the hero of the Gaspee, was 
placed in command of the armed vessels, the Washington and the 
Katy, and on the 15th of June, 1775, had the honor of firing the first 
cannon at his majesty's navy in the American revolution, when he 
chased the packet acting as tender to the frigate Rose, of Captain 
Wallace, on the Connecticut shore, and then and there captured the 
first prize in American waters. 



HS 

7. Continental navy : Nay, more. Rhode Island was the first to 
conceive the idea, to recommend and to urge upon Congress the 
establishment of a Continental navy. 

8. The postal system : Rhode Island was the mother of the 
American postal system. In the general assembly the system was 
fully organized June 15, 1775, by establishing routes, officers, rates of 
postage and the appointment of post-riders. 

9. The oldest state : All this before the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. But who was first here? Rhode Island! May 4, 1776, two 
months before the Declaration of Independence by the Continental 
Congress, Rhode Island formally enacted and declared her inde- 
pendence, abjuring forever, and alone, her allegiance to Great 
Britain. Thus Rhode Island is the oldest independent sovereign 
government in the western world. 

10. The war : During the war for independence no colony fur- 
nished more men and means to the common cause, in proportion to 
its population, than Rhode Island, and her loyal sons under Greene, 
who was second only to Washington in the field, under Hitchcock 
and Varnum, and Lippitt and Olney, fought with Washington in 
every great battle of the war, and Trenton Bridge showed the stuff 
of which our sires were made. 

11. The continental loan: Mr. President, my count has already 
run beyond the limit of my digits. I cannot, however, resist the per- 
suasion to add one more item to the count, and I desire especially to 
emphasize the importance of this item, not only because of its own 
inherent worth as a witness of the heroic spirit of '76 regnant in our 
brave little state, but also because I find the item nowhere set forth 
in that fullness which it deserves, and few of you have ever probably 
examined it in detail. We all know how vital to success in war are 
the sinews, not only of loyal men, but no less of money. This lesson 
we have been taught by the bitter experiences of our own day and 
generation. Who was it during all the long years of that late strug- 
gle who more generously than any other colony opened its treas- 
ures and poured them out like water, and that, too, without hope of 
return, into the common cause? Who? History answers, "Little 
Rhode Island." Though her state treasury was exhausted and 
largely in debt, by reason of expenses incurred in the French war, 
yet how nobly, how generously, how patriotically she responded to 
the call for aid. Only four colonies contributed more to the conti- 
nental loan than Rhode Island, and in proportion to her population, 
no one of them can be mentioned in the same sentence with her. 
Rhode Island contributed seven times as much as South Carolina; 
a ratio of 21 to i. Mr. President, the balance sheet of that conti- 
nental loan account, made up by the board of commissioners 
appointed by Congress in 1789 to adjudicate the claims hung up 



146 ' 

before you on these. walls were in itself eloquence enough to respond 
for Rhode Island in the revolution. Compatriots ! I desist, lest 
there be nothing of the first grade left for the other states. Each of 
the original thirteen has a list longer or shorter of glorious deeds, 
which entitles it, in this or that respect, to claim precedence of her 
sisters, but they have not all been equally successful in preserving 
the record and in heralding it before the world. Massachusetts has 
been especially favored by that long line of brilliant men of letters 
who have devoted their lives to the happy task of singing her 
praise and of embalming in prose and verse the immortal achieve- 
ments with which her career is crowded. " O, fortunate youth," 
said Alexander, as he stood by the tomb of Achilles in Sigeum. " O, 
fortunate youth, who found Homer as the herald of thy virtues. 
For had there been no Iliad, the same tomb which covered thy body 
would have buried also thy name." Rhode Island has not been 
wanting in first things, but Massachusetts has been more than rich 
in the heralds of her virtues. 

General Kellogg : It needs no word from me to 
introduce to you one who has so long honored this state 
in the senate of the United States, as the state has hon- 
ored him. I call for the next toast, which is '' The 
Continental Congress," and I have great pleasure in 
introducing Hon. Orville H. Piatt of the United States 
senate. (Tremendous applause, long continued.) 

SENATOR PLATT. 

Mr. Chairman and guests, ladies and gentlemen : If we could 
fully understand the character of our ancestors, their individuality, 
their peculiar characteristics, their unyielding natures, their God 
fearing, God loving lives, and realize how completely these great 
questions of grievances and right and liberty took possession of the 
entire population for a period of ten years, we should see that revo- 
lution and independence were not accidents, but inevitable results of 
the situation. Revolutions which begin in a passionate desire of 
men for freedom and end with the svibstantial advancement of 
liberty, are not of human planning. All through those ten eventful 
years the cause of human liberty w^as marching on according to the 
plan of the Almighty. More and more the hand of authority grew 
heavy. More and more there grew in the minds of the colonists a 
common impulse of resistance until in 1773 and 1774 the blockading 
of the port of Boston and the quartering of British troops within 
that town furnished the occasion which made a union of the colonies 
not only desirable but a logical necessity. Each colony was a separ- 



147 

ate people. They were jealous of each other, and their social and 
commercial conditions were repellent rather than attractive. But 
oppression was a common injury, freedom and liberty a common 
longing. There had been efforts at colonial union before, but the 
occasions which gave rise to them were transient and no permanent 
union had been possible. But now all were alive. To the men of 
New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and all the colon- 
ies, the necessity of a firm union became manifest, and the congress 
of 1774 was called. By whom it was first proposed is still a question 
of contention and doubt; it was in the minds of all, and possibly was 
suggested simultaneously in several quarters. It met on the 4th day 
of September, 1774, in the hall of an association of carpenters in 
Philadelphia, and remained in session for fifty-two days only. It 
soon became known as the Continental Congress. It is curious in 
these days, when it has come to be settled American doctrine that 
there shall be no farther extension of foreign sovereignty upon the 
western hemisphere, to recall the fact that the earliest dream of our 
forefathers was of a republic which should embrace all the people 
of the North American continent. It was because of the hope and 
plan that all the colonies, including Quebec, Nova Scotia and the 
other colonies to the north of us as well as Florida on the south, 
would unite with the thirteen American colonies, that the body 
which assembled was called the Continental Congress. This further 
fact is also noteworthy: that though the lovers of liberty were then 
seeking a union and a government which should control the conti- 
nent, no one in those days shouted " jingo." 

I regard the first congress which met in Philadelphia as the most 
remarkable representative body that the world has ever known. I 
regard the work of that fifty-two days as more difficult and impor- 
tant, more far-reaching in its consequences, more potent in the 
establishment of liberty and the elevation of mankind than the 
work of any other deliberative body. I know that it has been over- 
shadowed in the minds of men, in our minds and the mind of the 
historian, by the second congress, in which the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence was put forth. But the foundation on which the whole 
fabric of our union was built was laid broad and deep by the great 
men who first assembled in Philadelphia. Then first of all represen- 
tative men assumed to act for the people alone. They had found a 
new source of power, the people. In their " declaration and resolves" 
they described themselves as having been " appointed by the good 
people of the several colonies." Magic words, then first authorita- 
tively spoken in the world, but now recognized wherever republican 
institutions exist as naming and describing the sources of all right- 
ful power. In all their great papers they seem, almost unconsciously, 
indeed, to have relied upon the authority delegated to them by the 



148 

"good people" and, to appeal to the "good people "to ratify and 
confirm their proceedings. 

Connecticut sent three delegates, Eliphalet Dyer, Roger Sherman, 
and Silas Deane. If I speak for a few moments on the character, 
life and service of one of these delegates I may illustrate more fully 
than I can in any other way the dignity and importance of the work 
of that body. 

The active life of Roger Sherman covered the whole formative 
period of the history of the United States. During that quarter of 
a century he was an actor whose character, work and fame are not 
eclipsed by that of any other actor in the great scene. He did not 
participate in the battles of the revolution. He was not actively 
concerned in the furnishing of men and supplies for the state of Con- 
necticut, but his work was as essential as that of Trumbull or Putnam 
or any of the generals whose deeds shed lustre upon the history of 
our state. As much, indeed more than any other man of the times, 
he helped to construct the government which generals fought for 
and governors sustained. From 1774 to 1784 he was continuously a 
member of the Continental Congress and the Congress of the Con- 
federation, exceeding in length of continuous service any other dele- 
gate, with the single exception of James Duane of New York. He 
was not trained in the schools, he knew and struggled with poverty. 
The son of a farmer, settled in Newton, Mass., he was apprenticed 
to the trade of a shoemaker, and upon the death of his father, mainly 
supported a mother and two brothers for two years in the Massa- 
chusetts home by that occupation. He removed from Newton to 
New Milford. Conn., traveling on foot and carrying his shoemaking 
tools with him; joining his brother in New Milford, he continued to 
work at his trade for two years more, when he was appointed a 
county surveyor and soon turned his mathematical acquirements to 
good use both in that profession and in the compilation and sale of 
almanacs. In 1754 he was admitted to the practice of law in Litch- 
field county, and in 1761 removed to New Haven, which city became 
his residence until his death, as a senator of the United States, in 
1793, at the age of 72. 

In the rotunda of the Capitol at Washington, of the great histor- 
ical paintings which adorn the walls, none is more observed than the 
Declaration of Independence painted by our own Connecticut artist. 
Col. John Trumbull. Standing at the table where President John 
Hancock is seated the five members appointed a committee to draft 
the Declaration of Independence are presenting their report. Most 
conspicuous in the group are Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. 
Between Jefferson and Adams stands Roger Sherman. Benjamin 
Franklin occupies the left, and between Franklin and Jefferson, 
Livingston appears. In the picture he occupies his rightful place. 



149 

for he was the peer of Jefferson and Adams and Franklin. From 
the day m which he entered the Congress, his was a growing influ- 
ence until at the time of the constitutional convention no man sur- 
passed him in capacity, influence and strength. He was neither 
eloquent nor impassioned. As of St. Paul it might have been said 
of him that "his speech" was "of no account," and yet like St. 
Paul his words carried a weight far surpassing those of the mere 
orator, words that will guide and inspire mankind to the latest time. 

Connecticut has done him but partial justice. His statue, indeed, 
stands in the national memorial hall by the side of Governor Trum- 
bull, both the gift of the state, but of all the great men of the period, 
he alone has had no written history other than the brief sketch in the 
work " Lives of the Signers of the Declaration." Connecticut stands 
almost criminally negligent in its lack of historical writing. Had he 
lived in Massachusetts or Virginia the historians who have delighted 
to honor the men who honored those states, would have embalmed 
his name and memory in histories which would have placed him 
second to none of the statesmen of the revolutionary period. 

The bright record of Connecticut in the revolution is not eclipsed 
by that of any other state. She furnished many brave and able 
men, who contributed to the final triumph and establishment of pop- 
ular liberty, but as I read and study the history of Roger Sherman I 
am convinced that his statue should fill the highest niche in the 
temple of her fame. He took up his life as a humble shoemaker; he 
laid it down as our national law giver. 

General Kellogg: Gentlemen, the next toast will be 
responded to by one of the judges of our supreme court, 
who is a self-made man, and I would like to say more of 
him if there was a moment's time to say it. He will 
live a great many years yet, and at some time be chief 
justice, I hope. I wanted to tell you how he came home 
from the war with that empty sleeve, as a lieutenant- 
colonel, in his youth, and came to my office to study law; 
but I have no time for that, in justice to the speakers 
who are to follow. I supposed we should begin the 
speeches an hour or more earlier. I had not seen the 
bill of fare until we sat down at these tables. I had in- 
tended to make a short speech in introducing each 
speaker, and to say in them the very best things I had 
to say on this occasion, but you must lose all that. I 
will now call upon Hon. A. H. Fenn to give us a few 
words upon ''Litchfield County in the Revolution." 



ISO 

JUDGE A. H. FENN. 

Mr. Toastmaster: I appreciate the importance of the duty which 
you have assigned to me. My regret is that I am not more able to 
do the subject justice. I want to say, at the start, that it has seemed 
to me that he whose knowledge was derived solely from the his- 
tories, so-called, of Connecticut, might be likely to think that, com- 
paratively speaking, Litchfield county was not in the revolution at all. 
But it was, from the start to the finish; in it, as we are told to love 
the Lord, with all its might and strength and soul. This fact, 
indeed, one need not go far to discover. Whoever remembers that, 
at the beginning of the war — as ascertained by the census of 1774 — 
its entire territory, embracing a part of what now belongs to Hart- 
ford county, embracing also Westmoreland, also known as Wyom- 
ing, on the banks of the Susquehannah, soon to be the scene of the 
maddest massacre of modern times, repeated only by that deplored, 
but winked at by pious Europe and Christian America at the present 
time, in Armenia, this ample territory contained in all but two-thirds 
as many inhabitants as now reside in the city of Waterbury. Who- 
ever, I say, knowing and remembering this, knowing also the 
character, condition and avocation of those early settlers— for such 
they were — of most of that territory, engaged in clearing virgin 
forests, ploughing and planting fields and building houses, will then 
look at the published rosters of troops and regiments from this state 
engaged in that great struggle, will marvel to see how fully the 
pages of that book are studded with the names of those who dwelt 
among the hills, delved in the valleys and drank the waters of the 
springs and running brooks of Litchfield county. Marvel, also, and 
greatly, how they who stayed at home managed, from their meagre 
resources, to meet every requisition for money and supplies, even of 
four hogsheads of rum, promptly, uncomplainingly and with the 
right spirit. 

But, notwithstanding, the story of Litchfield county in the Ameri- 
can revolution has never been told, and it never will be. Here and 
there a scrap appears — only a scrap, that is all. The reason is 
apparent. No meeting of armed forces occurred within its territory. 
The wolf-den of Israel Putnam; the birthplace of Nathan Hale; the 
home of Governor Trumbull; the stamping grounds of Benedict 
Arnold, were not there situated. Then, as now, like little Jack, it 
sat in a corner. It pulled out its plums, but others claimed them 
and boasted how good they were. It was a man, still young, born, 
bred and married in Litchfield county, who captured the first 
British flag taken in the war; who, in the name of no less competent 
authority than that of the great Jehovah and of the Continental 
Congress, demanded the surrender of Ticonderoga. It was also a 



iSi 

man born in that county, and whose youth was there spent, to 
whom, on the very next day, Crown Point capitulated. But both 
Ethan Allen and Seth Warner are known to history as Green Moun- 
tain boys. So they were, but the mountains amongst which they 
grew and developed were in Connecticut, and not in Vermont. Such 
was the beginning; what of the end? It was another Litchfield boy 
— Captain Morris— who commanded the foremost company of the 
" forlorn hope," which, under Colonel Alexander Hamilton, stormed 
the forts at the siege of Yorktown. But what historian of Connec- 
ticut ever knew it, or cared to speak of it, if he did? On the other 
hand. Colonel Sheldon, commander of the corps of cavalry known in 
history as " Sheldon's Regiment of Horse," was for twenty years a 
resident of Litchfield, and his troops were raised almost exclusively 
in that vicinity. " This," says Kilbourn in his history of Litchfield, 
"was Washington's favorite corps, and continued to act under his 
immediate direction till the treaty of peace was signed— constituting 
at once his messengers, his body guard, and his agents for the 
accomplishment of any enterprise, however desperate." By the 
way, speaking of Washington, the late Solon B. Johnson, when 
editor of the Litchfield Sentinel, remarked in a review of Froude's 
Caesar, that Julius Caesar was quite a favorite in Litchfield. So 
also was Washington. Kilbourn says that once he rode through the 
town, and while doing so, at the head of his retinue, a man named 
demons sallied out with a square bottle of rum in his hand and said, 
" Great and glorious Washington, will you condescend to take a dram 
with such a poor dog as I am ? " The general took the bottle and 
put it to his lips; but for fear that he did not take much, let us drink 
heartily to his memory to-day. 

Litchfield from 1776 to 1780 was a depot for military stores and 
provisions, which were guarded by a considerable military force. It 
was also a prison in which several royalists of distinction were con- 
fined. Included in the list were Governor Franklin of New Jersey, 
only son of Benjamin Franklin, and Mayor Matthews of New York. 
The mayor was an intense royalist, and a peculiar man. Some in- 
teresting anecdotes relating to his tarry are told. When he went 
away he left his small hair-covered traveling trunk behind. This 
fell into the hands of the late Chief Justice Seymour, who used to 
carry it about with him, containing his papers, when he traveled 
upon the circuit, illustrative, perhaps, of the great truth that under- 
lies the poetic statement that "You may break, you may ruin the 
vase if you will; but the scent of the rose will hang 'round it still." 

It is related that once Judge Seymour put this trunk on the bench 
before him, drew out and read a decision, replaced it, took another, 
replaced that, and took still another, in a mandamus case. At that 
point a lawyer exclaimed audibly: "Another royal edict, by George, 
the Third." 



152 

But all this, Mr, Toastmaster, is not the history of Litchfield 
county in the revolution, any more than the mere fact that a mite 
was once cast into the treasury, is the story that as long as the 
gospel is preached will be told in honor of her who placed it there. 
Let us look a little deeper than this. In January, 1776, Tapping 
Reeve, afterwards chief justice of this state, who married the 
daughter of President Burr of Princeton, granddaughter of Jona- 
than Edwards, and only sister of Aaron Burr, then a nineteen year 
old boy, who in July previous had left the home which he had taken 
up in Litchfield with his sister to join the ill-fated expedition of 
Arnold through the wilderness to Quebec, wrote to Burr, "Your 
sister has many anxious hours on your account, but she tells me that 
as she believes you may serve the country in the business in which 
you are now employed she is content that you should continue in 
the arm^y. It must be an exalted public spirit that could produce 
such an effect upon a sister as affectionate as yours." 

The late Governor Wolcott was then a student of Yale. He was 
home. A summons came for more troops. His mother furnished 
his knapsack, hastened his departure and dismissed him with the 
charge, " See that you conduct yourself like a good soldier." 

In September, 1776, a company composed of thirty-six picked 
men, representatives of the leading families of Litchfield, went 
together into the service. Six only of all that company lived to 
return. A few only died in battle ; most of them perished in prison 
from cold, hunger, thirst, disease and cruelty worse than that 
experienced in later years by the inmates of Andersonville and 
Libby. Well did the atheist, Ethan Allen, exclaim of their keeper, 
" I confess my faith in my own creed is shaken. There ought to be 
a hell for such infernal scoundrels as that Lowrie." Is this the his- 
tory ? It is a page from it. Only a page, but of such pages as this, 
if it could be written, a mighty volume would be composed. And 
even then, of the part of Litchfield county in the war of the Ameri- 
can revolution, the half would not be told. 

And yet in another and better sense that story has been told, is 
telling, and will tell itself in all its fullness through the years and 
through the ages to come. The sister of Aaron Burr, the mother of 
Governor Wolcott, the thirty-six picked men from Litchfield, 
belonged to the last century no more truly, no more fully than they 
belong to this. They are not dead, and they will never die. Oh, 
my friends, if you are worthy sons of revolutionary ancestors, your 
patriotic fathers and mothers live again ; live and breathe and move 
and have their being in you. The country is safe in your keeping, 
because it was safe in theirs, and their spirit is in you. 

Standing here to-day, I should be false to the memory of my com- 
rades, false to duty, traitor to my own soul, if I did not say, as a 



153 

member of that Litchfield cotmty regiment baptized in blood in that 
deadliest battle in proportion to the number engaged of any contest 
in the war of the rebellion, out of the ranks of one battalion of 
which, only one-third of a single regiment, in a moment, in the 
twinkling of an eye, sixty-two men went from freedom's struggle 
beneath the starry flag to their eternal resting place in the bosom of 
God— if I did not say in their name, that it was the spirit of the 
fathers and of the mothers who placed their own lives, and the lives 
dearer to them than their own, upon the altar of their country, in 
the days of the revolution, that inspired their sons to emulate their 
example and to share their glorious fate. 

I have trespassed too long already upon your time. Pardon me, 
please. One word more, and I shall have finished. What Litchfield 
county was in the revolution, what it was in the rebellion, it is 
to-day, and I trust it will continue to be. Let us hope that hereafter 
our beloved land may enjoy in uninterrupted prosperity the victories 
of peace, and find them even more renowned than those of war. 
But if it should be ordered otherwise ; if days of disaster, strife and 
feud shall come, its country's summons to arms will sound in the 
ears of Litchfield county as the battle cry of freedom, and as 
before, to the call of Brother Jonathan and of Father Abraham, it 
will advance, salute the colors, and say to Uncle Sam, "Litchfield 
county, all present or accounted for." 

General Kellogg : Gentlemen, the next toast will be 
"A Plea for Old Put." We all of us believe in Old Put. 
I call upon Mr. John A. Porter to speak for him. 

JOHN A. PORTER. 

Mr. Toastmaster and Gentlemen of the Society : In listening to 
the eloquence of the gentlemen who have preceded me this after- 
noon, I am reminded of that familiar but characteristic incident in 
Lincoln's career, when, soon after one of Grant's memorable victo- 
ries, following close on a series of miserable defeats by his immedi- 
ate predecessors in command of the army, the president was waited 
on by a delegation of Baptist clergymen. These men, who were 
courteously received and patiently listened to at the White House, 
said they deemed it was their duty to inform the president that 
General Grant drank; and furthermore, they took the liberty of ask- 
ing him, after he had heard their story, what he thought ought to be 
done about it. And old Abe, with a sly twinkle in his eye, promptly 
replied, "Find some of the same brand for our other generals!" 
Now — although this is Waterbury— if I could only find some of the 



154 

same brand used by the other orators on this programme, I might 
stand a much better chance of entertaining you. 

Coming here to Waterbury — the home of the brass industry, and 
therefore logically of the highest development of the mugwump — I 
find myself among many old friends as well as new. I cannot forget, 
Mr. Toastmaster, that in the great wave of patriotic enthusiasm 
which during the past five years has swept with irresistible force 
through this whole country, reaching the practical culmination in 
the formation of our own and kindred societies, the Sons of the 
American Revolution is by far the most numerous and vigorous 
organization of its kind in existence to-day, and that in this order 
the Connecticut society stands at the head of the list, both in num- 
bers and in enthusiasm. 

I know not the details of the recent affairs of this society, but this 
I do know — that its management has been in wise hands ; that the 
Jonathan Trumbull of to-day has proved himself a sagacious and 
worthy successor of that great man, his ancestor, whose name he 
bears — the only colonial governor who dared to espouse the cause of 
the people against the king; who gave to Washington his most inti- 
mate friendship; to the new nation its most popular nickname, and 
to Connecticut an administration whose reputation for excellence 
has lasted even unto this day. 

The simple fact of the personnel and flourishing condition of this 
society is to my mind sufficient proof (though other evidence is 
ample) that Connecticut is to-day what she has always been, and 
pray God may ever remain — the freest, most absolute democracy on 
the American continent; where liberty is law and law is liberty; 
whose men acknowledge no bossism in affairs of state; whose 
women, daughters of the revolution, are as patriotic as her men, 
whether it be in times of peace or in times of war. 

But I do not allude, sir, simply to the martial spirit. To-day, when 
the battle is a financial one, and the honor and credit of the nation 
have been basely and brazenly attacked, and are in danger of being 
betrayed in the home of those who should be their most zealous and 
unselfish defenders, there is no community in all the broad land 
which, if I am not mistaken, is more unitedly and irrespective of 
party agreed than this, in favor of honest money and honest man- 
agement of fiscal affairs; nor is there any state in the union, if I 
judge aright, more sternly bent on rebuking whatever party, in 
vv^hatever disguise, may attempt to trifle with or evade this great 
question of patriotism and common sense. And if this is true, 
worthily and well is the integrity of the state represented, respect- 
ively in the senate and in the house at Washington, by men of such 
sterling character and steadfastness as Senator Piatt and the Hon. 
N. D. Sperry, who are members of this society, and whom we all 
rejoice to have with us here to-day. 



155 

But I must hasten on to my subject, for I do not wish to have you 
say that in speaking of the present I have forgotten the past. It is 
not my intention to occupy your valuable and limited time with any 
extended eulogy on the life and public service of that great man, the 
subject of my toast. His name and deeds are written in imperish- 
able letters of gold, not only in the minds of scholars, but in the 
hearts of the common people of America. 

"Old Put." had his grimly humorous side. He was the slayer of 
a she wolf just as large and a hundred times as real as that which 
suckled Romulus and Remus, and if you don't believe the legend is 
history, come to Pomfret and we'll easily convince you. He was one 
of the first Americans to realize the costly truth that the plaguey 
Indians must go, and to cheerfully lend him a helping hand in reach- 
ing the happy hunting ground. The old man had no use for a plow 
when his shoulder could be at one end of a musket, and a bullet and 
a British invader at the other. Without change of horses on one 
memorable occasion, you remember, he made the best time on 
record between Pomfret and Boston, since the consolidated New 
England railroad has stopped running through trains (I might 
almost say all trains), but I hope will resume them this after- 
noon. 

Putnam was the pioneer patriot of all New England; the essence 
of Yankee shrewdness and invincible pluck; indefatigable, intense, 
sublime in his faith that freedom would finally be won and sure that 
the cause in which he was enlisted was the best thing an American 
of that day could live for, and if need be, die for. He was, in his 
unique way, as essential to the generation as George Washington, 
the father of his country, as Abraham Lincoln, the great emanci- 
pator, or Ulysses S. Grant, the conqueror of the rebellion. There 
were no " outs " about him. He was not a great man intellectually. 
His education was defective and his taste and judgment were some- 
times at fault. But his personality was unique. The stalwartness 
of his manhood was superb and his physical courage and individual 
achievement were magnificent and inspiring. No truer or more 
typical son of New England ever lived, and he had the genius to 
anticipate by a century that spirit of intense and dauntless Ameri- 
canism which is one of our greatest bulwarks as a nation to-day; 
which dares to say to England "hands off the American continent; 
we are not like you, a professional fighter and land-grabber; we don't 
want to fight unless we must to guard our interests; but if you should 
come over to this side again, you would find us a hundred times as 
numerous and powerful as on your last visit and just as eager to 
pour out our blood and money that the stars and stripes may never 
be lowered to the combined crosses of St. George, St. Andrew and 
St. Patrick ! " 



156 

And yet Israel Putnam has his critics and sneerers and defamers, 
just as Washington had, just as Lincoln had, just as Grant had, just 
as to-day a few silly snobs are villifying the record of big-hearted, 
big-brained, useful " Ben" Franklin because, forsooth, as a young 
man he worked at the printer's case. A snarling yelping pack of 
human hyenas, jackals and wolves, I call them; ready under pretense 
of a pseudo gentility or ardor for discovering truth, to circulate 
calumny and willing, if need be, to flay alive their own ancestors in 
order to demonstrate the alleged keenness of modern scholarship. 
Other states may tolerate this species of outrage, but I trust there 
will be no patience with or sufferance of it in Connecticut. Let us 
honor our great men when living and respect their memories when 
dead — that is their best memorial. If Putnam had been a fraud, or 
had paraded in false colors, you may be quite sure that our grand- 
fathers and great-grandfathers would have found it out long ago. 

Permit me to say, as a resident of the town where Putnam used 
to live, once his humble successor in the of&ce of representative to 
the general assembly and, therefore, somewhat conversant with the 
details of his career, that most of these criticisms of him are down- 
right and unsubstantiated calumnies, and that the others are pictures 
so palpably distorted as to be burlesques. If a hundred years from 
now the historian should consult the columns of Puck and Judge, or 
other calmly critical journals, he might naturally infer that most of 
our leading public men were fit subjects for a menagerie or a prison, 
rather than for the duties of public office. The great men of history 
are those who have been most frequently and bitterly satirized — 
and the scoffers hesitated not to revile even the Savior of the 
world. 

Putnam gave all he had to humanity, to justice and to liberty. He 
lived not for himself, but for others. He fought not for gain, but 
glory. He won his reward when alive not in luxury or the holding 
of oflice, or the ease of fashionable society, but in simple faith in 
God and in doing what was right; in the love of his friends and 
neighbors, in the affection of his state and the gratitude and thanks 
of the nation which he had so conspicuously aided in creating. Now 
that he is dead, shall we deprive him of what he prized more than 
life, or allow the defamation by others to go unexposed and unre- 
buked ? 

The sneerer, Mr. President and gentlemen, especially if he be 
armed with a glib tongue and a touch of audacious oratory and glib 
humor, may strike a good cause with a temporary paralysis not easy 
to remove. I regret that the general assembly of this state, thrice 
earnestly appealed to, refused again last year, since the last annual 
meeting of this society, to appropriate a modest sum for the pur- 
chase and preservation, without further expense to the state, of Put- 



1.57 

nam's wolf den in the town of Pomfret. But still more do I regret 
that in the stately halls of the beautiful and peerless capitol building 
at Hartford, which should ever remain the home of the best deeds 
and noblest thoughts of the citizens of this grand old commonwealth, 
words should have been spoken, perhaps in the heat of debate, which 
seemed to echo the jibes and the pessimism of the attempt to laugh 
out of existence and expunge from our history some of the most bril- 
liant episodes of Israel Putnam's career. 

In my opinion, Mr. President and fellow members, this society 
could well afford to start with a generous contribution the list for 
the purchase of Putnam's wolf den by popular subscription. Such 
action would not only preserve this historic spot for future genera- 
tions, without any extra expense to the state, but would be the best 
and most practical proof, once for all, that the citizens of Connecticut, 
their patriotic societies at the head and the Sons of the American 
Revolution leading the way, had said to the rabble of scoffers, 
" you are not wanted here— go and return not ! " This would be an 
act performed in the name of justice and fair play; in the name of 
Connecticut loyalty and public spirit; in the name of the patriotic 
people of the United States, who appreciate and love a great man, 
and know that General Putnam was a great man. 

General Kellogg : By arrangement, I call the next 
toast out of order. We are going to get through on 
time. We have saved some of the best speeches and 
best wine for the last. I will call on N. D. Sperry, our 
congressman, to tell us how he likes the congress of the 
United States as far as he has got. (Laughter.) 

CONGRESSMAN SPERRY. 

Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen : You have seen fit to give 
me as a toast this evening, " The Congress of the United States." 
Now, it would have been much better, Mr. Toastmaster, for you 
to have talked upon this subject— you, who have the honor of six 
years of congressional life — than to call upon one who has been only 
three months in the service as a congressman. And it seems a little 
strange for a man who is learning his a, b, c in congressional life to 
be called upon for a sentiment of this kind. 

I remember once a gentleman, who was glorifying our country 
and government, closed his speech with the following quotation: 
that our government will live , 

" Till wrapped in flames the realm of ether glow, 
And heaven's last thunder shake the world below." 

12 



158 

Now, I never fully comprehended the meaning of these lines until 
my three months' service in the national house of representatives. 
I think now I understand the full meaning of the sentiment. Why, 
we are "wrapped in flames" almost every day on the floor of the 
house of representatives on some subject or another, and the noise, 
the bustle and the tumult of the house are more than equal, perhaps, 
to " the last thunder that shakes the world below," and the poet may 
have had in his mind the house of representatives when he uttered 
the expressions alluded to. 

Not long since one of the newspaper editors of our state alluded 
to a congressman who had been seen on Pennsylvania avenue with 
an attack of "blood-boiling," walking at a rapid pace with fire 
streaming from his mouth and ears to such an extent that it was 
necessary to call out the fire department of the city to subdue the 
flames, which were issuing from his person, but I assure you there 
was no need of the fire department being called out, for the gentle- 
man had in his pocket a New Haven newspaper, giving an account 
of the "blood-boiling," which contained news of the "first water," 
and even the possession of it in his pocket subdued the flames at 
once. 

Well, I suppose I must say something about the house of repre- 
sentatives and congressional matters. Did you ever go fishing or 
hunting, whipping the streams all day for trout, and finding but few ? 
Or did you ever tramp over the fields all day for partridge, quail or 
woodcock, and after a tramp until you were completely tired out, 
you turn from the fields of your labors, with only here and there a 
solitary bird, or none at all, to reward you for your day of tramp 
and toil ? 

So it is with the congressman's life in Washington; he has several 
bills in his pockets, of great interest to his country and his constitu- 
ents; he is trying to find the committee or the sub-committee to 
whom his bill was referred, but finds them not, or at least not a 
majority of them, to hear his case. This is an every day experience. 
A congressman tramps from committee room to committee room, up 
stairs and down stairs, ready to unload his arguments in favor of 
his project, without finding enough members of the committee pres- 
ent to consider his case, and he goes home tired, weary and forlorn, 
disconsolate, after a day passed in going the rounds of the commit- 
tees. In the morning he arises, goes to his ofiice, answers some 
twenty -five or thirty letters, goes through the same thing as the day 
before, and again returning at night reads and answers the same 
number of letters. This is a fair outline of the daily life of a con- 
gressman. 

It seems as though congressmen acted at times so as not to do 
that which the people expect might be done. There are thousands 



159 

of bills before congress, in which the people are interested, and 
upon which much labor and thought have been expended, and yet, 
when the session closes, only a few of them have come to light, or 
have even been heard of upon the floor of the house, because per- 
haps the originator of the bill has been unable to get his hearing 
before the committee in time to have the house and the senate act 
upon it. 

And yet, my friends, let us not despair. The government at 
Washington still lives, and is pursuing its noisy and fiery demon- 
strations each day, and in the end perhaps out of a bushel of bills 
here and there some grain is saved. Perhaps it is well, my friends, 
that so little legislation is accomplished. Perhaps it is well for the 
country that all the bills presented do not pass, nor are ever heard of 
again; and yet it seems strange, passing strange, to everyone who 
has his pet measures and schemes, that his bills, upon which he has 
expended so much thought and labor, have come to naught. 

Congress has many true and valiant statesmen among its mem- 
bers, men who are really great and gifted in legislation, who are 
striving to do their best for the good of the country, and oftentimes 
accomplish great and noble results. If you could have been present 
for the last ten days in the house of representatives, and heard the 
various orators, learned in history and skilled in figures, and how 
one man's ideas of our financial matters differ from those of another, 
you might well have exclaimed : Alas, alas, can it be that we all 
belong to the same human race and the same country ? 

But, with Washington and other great statesmen, whose lives 
adorn the pages of history, let us take courage. We have seen 
great men, and good men, come and go, leaving behind them works 
and deeds which are imperishable. 

General Kellogg: The next toast on the list is "The 
Women of the American Revolution, and the Daugh- 
ters of To-Day." Who is there in this broad land better 
fitted to speak upon this momentous subject than the 
gallant Colonel Osborn of the Register 2 We know there 
are Daughters of the American Revolution to-day. They 
have been in Washington this week, and Congressman 
Sperry and his associates know that they can beat the 
house of representatives out of sight, in a scrap of 
debate on the floor, if reports are true. (Laughter from 
the galleries.) I will introduce to you upon this subject 
my friend. Colonel N. G. Osborn. (Tremendous ap- 
plause and cheers.) 



i6o 



COLONEL OSBORN. 

Ladies, Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen: I thank your gracious 
toastmaster for his felicitous introduction. He is always felicitous, 
both in positions of this character, in positions of a more public 
character, and in whatever manner his mind insists upon operating. 
I have never known him to occupy other than a felicitous attitude. 
A few weeks ago when I visited Waterbury, among other charming 
people with whom I came in contact was a branch of his own family. 
They showed me with becoming affection and interest the family 
photographs. Among others was a snap shot of your toastmaster 
walking on the sands of Narragansett Pier, holding his grandchild by 
the hand. Both were attired in bathing costumes, but particularly 
felicitous was the bathing costume of the grandsire. It stopped ab- 
ruptly at the knees, and was striped with alternating bands of color. 
I thought then what a felicitous costume it was for a republican to 
wear in public and in private. 

In assigning me the toast of ' ' The Women of the Revolution and 
Their Daughters of To-day," you put upon me a task that a younger 
man would have shrunk from with dismay. If one is going to talk 
about women, whether those who have gone before or those who 
bewilder us to-day, it is well for one to be out of the matrimonial 
market and therefore secure from the penalty of free speech. I 
have never lost my interest in the "daughters of to-day," and among 
other things that I am grateful for is the feeling of emotion that 
overcomes me whenever a beautiful creature sweeps across my path. 

But in order to gain a more or less clear notion of the women of 
the revolution, other than I could gain by study of their daughters, 
I have been obliged to hastily glance into the pages of history. I 
am very gratified to receive as my first impression that the women 
of the revolution were as popular and necessary to the men of that 
period as their daughters of to-day are to us. To get along without 
them was very like depriving one of both one's arms, which, as you 
can imagine, would be an exceedingly great sacrifice under the cir- 
cumstances. I was very much struck with the needs of the men of 
Jamestown in 1619, who found themselves very much demoralized 
for the want of women's society. So far as I can gather, they stood 
around street corners, indulged in degenerating games, and gen- 
erally participating in a sort of life that brings men to early graves. 
The London company, realizing this fact, sent out a batch of 
assorted maidens, who were sold to the men of Virginia at the cheap 
price of 100 pounds of tobacco. When a man parts with his tobacco 
it must be taken for granted that he is very much moved, and there- 
fore we may infer that women were very much needed there at that 
time. The chronicles of the time tell us that this transaction, which 



i6i 

was a purely business one, turned many an adventurer into a citizen, 
and made it possible for Virginia to take on the dignity of a colony. 

As is well known, the best part of history is its unwritten part, 
the incidents and accidents of life that furnish an inspiration 
unknown to meditation and preparation. So it is in attempting 
to identify the great value of the women of the revolution to the 
men of the time, or the inspiration furnished by their daughters of 
to-day to the men of to-day, the difficulty lies in one's ability to 
appropriate the incidents and accidents of unwritten history. 

Loyalty is an essential characteristic of woman. Some call it con- 
stancy, but whatever terms it goes by, history is full of superb illus- 
trations of not only the devotion of woman to man, but, what is 
more touching and appealing, the dependence of man upon the devo- 
tion of woman. It is not flattering to our sense of patriotism, as we 
celebrate it to-day, that a group of New York ladies in 1779 sub- 
scribed a liberal sum of money to fit out an expedition in defense of 
the mother country. It would have been more to their credit, from 
our point of view, had they fitted out this expedition in defense of 
American independence. But since, for reasons which it is no longer 
instructive to inquire into, they acted as they did, we may at least 
accept their act as another illustration, stronger by contrast, of the 
intuitive devotion of their sex to an avowed cause. 

One might go on multiplying instances in the history of those 
stormy times showing the encouragement and aid given the men by 
the women of the revolution. They were, in fact, Spartans in every 
sense of the word, ready to sacrifice husbands, sons and grandsons 
to gain political and religious freedom for their country, and secure 
for their posterity'- the benefit of independent existence and a demo- 
cratic form of government. The same spirit, though more softened 
in its demonstration, was manifested on every hand by the daughters 
of the women of the revolution in our civil war. The influence of 
woman is so subtle that wherever she is there must be greater 
refinement, more self-respect, more true dignity. Woman is the bul- 
wark of our church, of our nation and our state. In her hands rests 
the purity of society; in her hands lies the welfare of the family; in 
her hands rests the making and unmaking of citizenship. This must 
all be true, or else the divine order of things which makes man the 
son of woman is not divine at all, but the result of a material con- 
dition of things not reassuring for the future. We have reason to 
exclaim, "God bless the women of the revolution!" We have 
reason to exclaim, " God bless their daughters of the civil rebel- 
lion ! " We have still greater reason to exclaim, " God bless their 
daughters of to-day, who make us what we are, and who are the 
silent watchers of the night on everlasting duty, to save us and our 
nation by their example from the sophistries of demagogues and 
from the temptations of selfish gain." 



l62 

General Kellogg: There is plenty of time before 
the train goes. I will now call upon the Hon. Lynde 
Harrison of New Haven to respond to the next toast, 
which is " Washington's Farewell Address." 

LYNDE HARRISON. 

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen: The farewell address of 
Washington and the papers of the federalist interpret the fundamen- 
tal principles of the constitution, but the farewell address stands pre- 
eminent above all that Madison and Hamilton wrote, because it spoke 
the sentiments of the one man whom the patriots who conducted the 
war of the revolution and the statesmen who framed the constitution 
absolutely trusted on all occasions. During the four years that 
elapsed while the first president of our country was preparing the 
sentiments of the address to be delivered when he should retire from 
the office of chief magistrate, the people were divided into two classes; 
those who hated England for her conduct during the war of the rev- 
olution and who loved France for the assistance given in the great 
struggle, and those who admired the stability of the institutions of 
England, the home of their forefathers, and were horrified at the ex- 
cesses and crimes committed in the name of Libert}'- by a people 
who were unfit for it. The constitution had been adopted after much 
opposition, with doubt and hesitation. Its admirable system of checks 
and balances, reservations and grants of power, had not then shown 
by the experience of time their wisdom and excellence. Men differed 
widely about its construction and were jealous of the powers con- 
ferred upon the federal government. 

Partisanship upon all these issues had descended into the grossest 
of personalities. Political parties divided upon the lines of those 
who had Anglophobia and those who were afflicted with Francoma- 
nia; and upon the theories held by those who favored either strict or 
liberal construction of the constitution. "Washington, therefore, de- 
termined that his final duty to the people of his country required 
him to present for their frequent revision the sentiments he held, 
which were the result of much reflection and great observation, and 
which appeared to him all important for the permanency of their 
felicity as a people. 

Whatever opinions Washington entertained concerning foreign 
alliances or entanglements, the warning was against interference 
with interests that were purely European. None knew better than 
Washington that it is the duty of a nation to take care of its own 
special interests; to look to its boundaries; to see that no cordon of 
European interests should surround our own institutions upon this 
continent. None knew better than he that while in the phrase of the 



i63 

book men, international law is founded in part upon long established 
usages, conventions and treaties between nation and nation, yet that 
the underlying principles of international law, which are intended 
to prevent war and wrong, being perpetrated by one nation upon 
another, are the golden rule, the divine law, and Christian ethics. 

None knew better than he that more than a generation before that 
time Vattel, the great authority on international law, declared that 
if a preponderant state commits acts of injury against its neighbors, 
or any of them, or, by the arrogance of its pretensions, the tone of its 
public dispatches and manifestoes, or by any other course of conduct, 
beyond the mere increase of its strength, it clearly threatens to 
attack or oppress its neighbors, then other states are justified in com- 
bining together and in making war upon it, so as to prevent it from 
committing disturbance of the general security of the commonwealth 
of civilized nations, or of the security and independence of any of 
them. This doctrine was sound international law for many years 
before the so-called Monroe doctrine, which is the doctrine the 
American people, without distinction of party, to-day support. 

But there is one issue before us to-day, the most important since 
the days of the civil war, to which Washington, fresh with the mem- 
ories of colonial and continental paper currency, felt it his duty to 
call the attention of his fellow citizens, and he used these words : 

"As a very important source of strength and security cherish 
public credit. One method of preserving it is to use it as sparingly as 
possible : — avoiding occasions of expense by cultivating peace, but 
remembering also that timely disbursements to prepare for danger 
frequently prevent much greater disbursements to repel it — avoiding 
likewise the accumulation of debt, not only by shunning occasions 
of expense, but by vigorous exertions in time of peace to discharge 
the debts which unavoidable wars may have occasioned, not ungen- 
erously throwing upon posterity the burthen which we ourselves 
ought to bear. The execution of these maxims belongs to your 
representatives, but it is necessary that public opinion should co- 
operate." 

When Washington advised that the public credit should be securely 
guarded he knew the losses which America had sustained during the 
war and after the peace of 1783 from the pestilent effects of paper 
money on the necessary confidence between man and man and in the 
public counsels; on the industry and morals of the people; and the 
character of republican government. He knew that the financial 
blunders of the preceding generation had created an enormous debt 
against those states which had permitted the issuance of bills of 
credit. He knew, as did all the f ramers of the constitution , whether 
federalists or democrats in theory, whether of the Hamiltonian or 
Jeffersonian school, that the constitution was understood by its 



164 

framers and by the states that ratified it, to be a grant of power only 
to the federal government. He knew that the authority given the 
federal congress to coin money and regulate its value, was to secure 
a uniform standard of sound money. He knew the framers of the 
constitution, when they prohibited to the states the power to issue 
bills of credit, and from making anything but gold and silver a legal 
tender for the payment of debts, had never dreamed of conferring 
upon the representatives of the several states power which they had 
prohibited to the states themselves. He never believed, whatever 
the exigencies of war might be, that a federal congress would assume 
the power to make the paper promises to pay money, a legal tender for 
the payment of debts, and in his wildest apprehensions for the future 
he never thought that within a hundred years, the nation he had 
founded, even if in the exigencies of war and the danger of dissolu- 
tion it should issue treasury notes, would for a generation after peace 
was established, fail to pay its debt payable on demand, and make 
the evidences of that debt a continual legal tender for the payment 
of all obligations. 

General Kellogg : The last toast will be responded 
to in one of the best speeches of the day; it is, "The 
Sons of the American Revolution in New York." Hon. 
Walter S. Logan, " a chip from the old block " from 
Litchfield county, such as Connecticut sends out, will 
respond to it. 

WALTER S. LOGAN, JR. 

I bring you to-day the hearty greetings of the Empire State Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. We are a society that has 
grown 300 per cent in three years, and we have only just begun to 
grow. We have been growing, as our whole fraternity has been 
growing, not simply in numbers, but in enthusiasm, in patriotism, in 
influence, and in the power for patriotic work. It gives me great 
pleasure to be with the Connecticut State society to-day. In propor- 
tion to the population of the state, the Connecticut society is the 
largest and strongest of any society in the Union; and so it should be, 
for, in proportion to its population, Connecticut contains to-day more 
people of colonial ancestry than any other state in the Union. 

Although I come to you as a messenger from another state, I do 
not come as a stranger. I can never be a stranger in the state of 
Connecticut. Not only was I born and educated and grown to 
maturity here myself, but every ancestor I have had for the last 250 
years was also born, and has also lived in Connecticut. And while I 
have done my voting in recent years in your sister state, on the Hud- 
son, I still claim the privileges of Connecticut citizenship. I keep 



i65 

the old place in Litchfield county where I and my ancestors were 
born, and my family always make it their summer home. Geograph- 
ically considered, Connecticut is one of the smallest of the states. 
Measure only the number of its acres, and it does not amount to much. 
Compared with the other states in the union, it has a small popula- 
tion — that is, if you count only the people who sleep every night 
within its borders — but if you count those and the descendants of 
those who have gone out from Connecticut to settle this great land, 
and to build up these United States of ours, Connecticut is one of the 
largest states in the union. All New York state, northern Pennsyl- 
vania, western Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and states 
farther west, are full of men who were either born in Connecticut, 
or who come from Connecticut ancestry; and wherever the sons of 
Connecticut have gone, you find them abroad as you find them at 
home, among the most stalwart people on the face of the earth. 

We are celebrating the birthday of George Washington, a man 
who, above and beyond all others, by his rare fidelity, ripe judgment, 
splendid courage and magnificent leadership, won the independence of 
his country— nay more, he won the liberty of his race, and established 
free institutions, not only for our country, but for the world as well. 

It is a great mistake to regard the war of the American revolution 
as a contest simply between America and England. It really repre- 
sented a contest on the part of the liberty-loving people of both 
countries against the partisans of despotism in both countries, for 
free institutions on both sides of the Atlantic. It was but a phase of 
the eternal struggle for human liberty everywhere. 

The people of the colonies were by no means unanimous in support 
of the American cause. Outside the cities there was, it is true, a 
decided majority for the patriots; but in the cities, especially outside 
of New England, there was usually a majority for the partisans of 
despotism. Taking the whole country through, the patriots undoubt- 
edly out-numbered their opponents, but the tories had the most 
wealth, the most culture and the most influence. There were several 
whole regiments of American tories fighting on the English side all 
through the war, and during some periods of the struggle there were, 
fighting in the British ranks, more English-speaking soldiers from 
this side the ocean than the other. 

Neither were the English people at all united in support of the 
cause of her government. 

In parliament, we find the elder William Pitt saying : " It is not 
by canceling a piece of parchment that we can win back America. 
You must respect her fears and her resentments." 

And again : " You cannot conquer America. If I were an Ameri- 
can, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my 
country I would never lay down my arms, never, never, never." 



i66 

And still again, the great English statesman said that if the Amer- 
icans should give np their struggle, he would consider them fit only 
to be slaves and fit instruments of despotism to make slaves of 
others. 

The Duke of Richmond said at the beginning of the war that he 
hoped the Americans might succeed because they were right. 

Charles Fox spoke of the battle of Long Island, the anniversary of 
which we celebrated with so much eclat in Brooklyn last summer, 
and which was perhaps our worst defeat during the whole war, as 
"the terrible news from Long Island," But when he was told of 
the surrender of Cornwallis, he leaped from his chair and shouted 
for joy. 

Edmund Burke declared that he would rather himself be a prisoner 
in the Tower than enjoy the blessings of freedom with the men who 
were trying to enslave America. The younger William Pitt, the 
noble son of a noble father, in his first speech in the house of com- 
mons, when only twenty-two years old, denounced the American 
war as " most accursed, wicked, barbarous, cruel, unnatural, unjust, 
and diabolical." Burke, who heard him, enthusiastically said, " He 
is not simply a chip of the old block. He is the old block itself." 

George Onslow, a partisan of the king, said in the house of com- 
mons : 

" Why have we failed so miserably in this war against America, if 
not from the support and countenance given the rebellion in this 
very house ?" 

Outside of parliament, the people were very generally in sympathy 
with us. Alderman Beckford of London, father of the illustrious 
author of " Vathek," when asked what he would do in relation to the 
troubles in America, replied : 

" Do like the best of physicians and heal the disease by doing 
nothing." 

And the London aldermen cheered his reply. The whigs, who 
have always been the party of liberty and progress in England, all 
through the war did all they could to discourage enlistments and to 
vex and thwart the English government in its efforts to conquer 
America. The success of the Americans was everywhere attributed 
to the assistance and sympathy of the English whigs. The buff and 
blue colors that they wore were said to have been adopted in imita- 
tion of the Continental uniforms. They habitually spoke of Wash- 
ington's army as " our army," and of the American cause as " the 
cause of liberty." They were Englishmen and had the English 
pride, but they were Saxons and knew it was Saxon institutions that 
were in danger. 

So well understood was this, that the English government did not 
dare trust Englishmen as soldiers here, but relied for the material 



167 

for their armies upon American tories and foreign mercenaries. 
The army that accompanied Lord Howe to Boston at the very be- 
ginning of the struggle was, it is true, composed of English-speak- 
ing soldiers, and some of them stayed through the war; but they 
were almost the last English-speaking soldiers that England sent 
over. In the battle of Long Island, when it raged the hottest, the 
soldiers upon both sides were within speaking distance of each other, 
but they could not understand each other's language. Of those that 
surrendered with Burgoyne at Bemis Heights, the majority con- 
sisted of a Hessian division commanded by a Hessian general. It 
was a thousand Hessians that Washington captured during his mid- 
night raid upon Trenton, and it was Hessian regiments that he put 
to flight, one by one, a few days later at Princeton. When Corn- 
wallis surrendered at Yorktown, the majority of his army were for- 
eigners, and there is now a Hessian settlement in Mecklenburg 
county, North Carolina, the descendants of Hessian prisoners, who 
preferred to settle here rather than go back to their own country. 

These Hessians were to be bought and to be paid for by the 
English government, so much for every one killed, a less price for 
one only wounded, and cheapest of all for every one brought back 
unhurt. 

The electoral prince of Hesse Cassel wrote to his manager after 
the Jersey campaign: 

" You cannot think how much pleased I was to hear that out of the 
1955 Hessians who took part in the battle, no more than 345 remain: 
There are, accordingly, 1610 dead — no more and no less — and so the 
treasury owes me, according to our contract, 634,000 florins. The 
court of London says, it is true, that some hundreds of them are only 
wounded, who cannot be paid for like the dead, but I hope that, 
remindful only of my instructions given to you at Cassel, you have 
not tried to save within human help these poor fellows who could 
have bought life only at the sacrifice of a leg or an arm. That 
would be a sad present to them, and I am sure that they prefer to 
die gloriously rather than live lamed and unfit for my service. 
Remember that out of the 300 Spartans but one remained in life. 
Oh, how happy would I be if I could say the same of my brave 
Hessians ! " 

Every Hessian soldier sent here by the English government was a 
confession that Englishmen themselves were not willing to fight 
against the American cause. There was no lack for the material for 
soldiers right upon the British Isles themselves. Larger armies 
than England now needed had been raised during the earlier part of 
the century in the wars against France and they were composed of 
English soldiers. Far larger armies than any ever sent to America 
followed Wellington a little later against Napoleon, and they, too, 



i68 

were composed of English soldiers. The only time when England 
has ever had to hire foreign mercenaries for her wars is when she 
undertook to fight Americans. To the honor of the English nation 
and the English name be it said that so many of her people seemed 
to prefer the triumph of liberty way off across the ocean to the 
triumphs of despotism at home. 

The fact is that the people were divided upon both sides of the 
water. Those of aristocratic blood and lineage, those who had been 
educated to believe in absolutism and divine rights, those who 
thought that there was one class of people born to rule the world and 
another class born to obey, those who were the partisans of despotism 
everywhere — and there were plenty of them, and are yet, on this side 
the ocean as well as the other — were for the king. The common 
people who loved liberty — as the common people on both sides the 
ocean did then and do now — were against the king and in sympathy 
with the splendid struggle that the American colonies were making. 

It is the Saxon race alone that has been able to build up and 
maintain free institutions. Nations of other blood and lineage have 
sometimes enjoyed some degree or some kind of freedom, but they 
have never laid the foundations of permanent free institutions. The 
Latins had but one institution — imperialism, absolutism, des- 
potism. The Latins knew no such things as rights. They had only 
privileges. In the wild anarchy of the German forest, our ancestors 
had much that the refinement of our age does not like; but whatever 
other things they had, they were free men and always had rights. 
They had rights because they were ever ready, individually or col- 
lectively, to maintain them by their own strong arms. And so, when 
our Saxon ancestors settled the Island of Briton they never allowed 
an absolute monarchy to become established there, as it was over the 
rest of Europe. At Runnymede they wrested from the unwilling 
hands of King John the great charter of Anglican liberty. Later, 
John Eliot dared to stand in parliament and demand the rights of 
Englishmen, and Hampden and Pym defied the whole power of the 
crown in their refusal to pay an illegal tax. At Naseby and Marston 
Moor, our ancestors rose in battle and defeated the king, who at- 
tempted to subvert Saxon institutions; and then, having made him a 
prisoner, they arraigned this same king before a jury, convicted him, 
and cut off his head. Fifty years later, when the son of that king 
tried to follow in the footsteps of his father, they drove him an exile 
from his kingdom and placed upon his throne the grandson of that 
William of Orange, who had fought so valiantly for liberty upon the 
dikes of Holland. 

The bulwark of Anglican freedom, the basis of all free institutions, 
has always been, and must always be, the control of the purse of the 
nation by the representatives of the people. Money is necessary to 



169 

support a despotism. If a despot could always supply himself with 
unlimited funds, he could maintain his sway in any country with or 
without the permission of the people. It is necessary only to be able 
to enlist a sufficiently large army and secure an adequate armament 
to make an absolute throne secure. It was because they knew that 
our Saxon ancestors have built the fabric of Anglican liberty around 
the principle that the people who pay the taxes shall determine what 
shall be done with the proceeds of taxation. No king can long 
oppress a people when he must finally ask them for money to pay 
the instruments of oppression. And so it was that at Runnymede, at 
Naseby, at Marston Moor, and wherever the occasion has called for 
it, Saxon freemen have compelled their kings to recognize the 
principle that there shall be no taxation without representation, 

George III had been told by his mother, " George, be a king; " and 
he thought if he was to be a real king he must himself have control 
of the purse of the nation. He did not dare to try this too much in 
England at first, and so he began to experiment on America to see 
how Englishmen would stand it. 

In his aims and ambitions, George III was a close imitator of King 
John, of Henry VIII, of Charles I, and of James II. He simply 
tried new methods to accomplish old results. He tried to rule as 
absolutely as they did, but through a parliament unrepresentative of 
the people, craven and servile to the crown. The English parlia- 
ment had never been a particularly popular body. The house of 
lords was, of course, hereditary. The basis for suffrage in the 
house of Commons was very narrow, and had not been materially 
changed for 200 years. At the time of George III only one man in 
fifty of the population could vote, and it was a property qualification 
that kept out the others. But, notwithstanding all this, in former 
times, although not popular, the parliament had been fairly repre- 
sentative. The large farmer voted and by his vote he represented 
quite closely the sentiments of his farm laborers, who could not 
vote. The manufacturers and tradesmen in the towns voted and in 
so doing represented fairly the wishes and interests of their clerks, 
apprentices, artificers, and workmen who could not vote. But a 
change had come over the condition of society. The workingmen 
no longer considered that their interests were fairly represented by 
their employers and men without the requisite qualifications com- 
plained bitterly that the government represented property rather 
than manhood. But that was not the worst trouble with the house 
of commons. They had the rotton borough system. The division 
of England into parliamentary districts had been last made some 200 
years before. Then a certain number of seats had been given to 
each city or borough and a certain number to each county. But the 
200 years which had since intervened had been a time of wonderful 



170 

growth and development. The course of population had entirely 
changed. Where once had been cities were now only ruins and 
desolation, and where 200 years before, the heather had bloomed in 
loneliness upon the mountain side, were now great and prosperous 
cities; and so it was that places like Old Sarum, an ancient borough, 
sent two members to the house of commons, although often there 
was only one voter living in the town and he was kept there by some 
influential politician simply that he might return these two men to 
legislate for all England. On the other hand, Manchester, Leeds, 
Birmingham and Liverpool, now great cities, had not a single repre- 
sentative in the British legislature. The greater part of London 
itself, which had far outgrown the limits of the old city, was entirely 
unrepresented. The rotten borough system had become such an 
appalling evil that it was calculated that 168 members, nearly a third 
of the whole house of commons, had no constituency behind them 
and more than a third of the nation was entirely unrepresented in 
parliament. 

George III saw his opportunity and undertook to "be a king." By 
the judicious bestowal of office he succeeded in capturing the whole 
168 members from the rotten boroughs. By open corruption and 
bribery he secured others who had some constituency and a certain 
percentage of ancient fossils could always be depended on in addi- 
tion to vote for whatever was aristocratic, illiberal, out of date, and 
contrary to the spirit of the age. Altogether, he had a majority of 
the house of commons, who were the servile instruments of his will, 
and so he was "a king." The English parliament that, at his com- 
mand, levied the stamp duty and passed the Townsend acts to 
enslave America, was no more representative of the people of Eng- 
land than it was of the people of the colonies, and it was hardly more 
popular there than here. 

The people upon both sides of the water now pretty well under- 
stood the issue. George III was pursuing his high-handed course 
more to stifle the voice of the people of England crying for parlia- 
mentary reform and to build up for himself an absolute monarchy 
there than to get the insignificant addition to his revenue that the tax 
laws he had passed would give him from what he called his colonial 
possessions. We were resisting, not so much because we cared for 
the paltry sums of money that George III demanded, as because 
there was being violated the fundamental principle of Anglican 
liberty that there shall be no taxation except by the representatives 
of^the people to be taxed and because this was intended to be the 
entering wedge which was to rend in twain the liberties of both 
America and England. 

We, Sons of the American Revolution, celebrate every year the 
anniversaries connected with the great events of the revolutionary 



171 

war and the birthdays of our great heroes. We are celebrating 
to-day the birthday of George Washington, a man whose memory 
commands the respect and honor and admiration and love not only 
of the people of these United States, but of the liberty-loving people 
of the whole world. Two years ago our society in New York cele- 
brated the Boston tea party; last year the battle of Cowpens; this 
year the battle of Princeton — and we had a speech from Senator 
Piatt of Connecticut that many of you heard and all of you would 
have been glad to hear; and a few months ago we celebrated in New 
York the closing of the war of the revolution as represented by the 
treaty of peace with Great Britain and the evacuation of New York 
city. But there is one anniversary which I have never known to be 
celebrated in this country, and which I think our society can well afford 
to make the distinguishing feature of one of its annual banquets. On 
the 2oth of March, 1782, Lord North's ministry fell. The attempt of 
George III to " be a king" and control the purse strings of a nation 
of Saxon freemen had failed. 

That fact had more to do with the close of the revolutionary war 
than even the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. Lord North's 
government was succeeded by a ministry composed of as good friends 
as America has ever had on either side of the ocean. The Duke of 
Richmond, who wished us good luck at the beginning, was in it; 
Charles Fox who mourned with us over the terrible news from Long 
Island and rejoiced with us over the surrender of Cornwallis, was in 
it; Lord Shelburne, the intimate friend of Benjamin Franklin, was in 
it; and Edmund Burke, ever the friend of human liberty, was con- 
nected with the government. The elder William Pitt had been 
gathered to his fathers, but his great son, the Saxon of the Saxons, 
the man whose maiden speech in parliament had been a denuncia- 
tion of the American war, came in a little later. The agent they 
chose to negotiate with our Franklin was John Oswald, a Scotchman 
owning estates in America and thoroughly in sympathy with our 
cause. Lord North, when officially announcing the appointment of 
the new ministry, which was to succeed him, said privately that he 
had often been accused of issuing lying bulletins, but never before 
had he told so big a lie as when he said " His majesty has been 
pleased to appoint " a new ministry. It was as bitter a pill as any 
English monarch has ever had to swallow. 

The war came to an end, not because England could fight no longer 
— she was found fresh and vigorous enough to sustain the great 
Napoleonic contests a few years later,— not because England had been 
defeated in a battle or two on this side of the Atlantic— she had sus- 
tained defeats before and has sustained them since without raising 
the white flag; it was simply because the men representing the Eng- 
lish people, who had come to control the English government, were 



172 

in sympathy with the American cause and knew it to be the cause of 
freedom, dear to their own hearts. 

If we had had to settle the matter with England alone, there would 
have been no trouble whatever. Her new government was willing to 
concede, as the first act of the negotiations, the independence of the 
American colonies. We had fought the battle of Saxon freedom for 
them as well as for ourselves, and we were entitled to our reward. 
It was no trouble for Franklin and Oswald to agree. They both 
wanted the same thing. There were no differences of opinion be- 
tween Charles Fox and George Washington, men who had wept 
together over the defeat on Long Island and rejoiced alike over the 
victory at Yorktown. The real trouble was not with Saxon England, 
but with Latin France and Spain, with whom we were mixed up in 
treaty obligations. The French government had sent us men and 
advanced us money during the war when we needed it sorely, and 
for that act we did, and do, and ever shall, thank her most sincerely. 
She had done it rather because she hated England, our enemy, than 
because she loved our cause; but whatever the motive, she is entitled 
to our warm and undying gratitude. La Fayette, Rochambeau, and 
other gallant Frenchmen, it is true, had fought on our side valiantly 
and heroically because they were the stalwart friends of human free- 
dom, but in this they were by no means in sympathy with their 
government. 

There is no doubt that the French government, from its standpoint, 
had made a mistake. Her statesmen had failed to appreciate what 
the American war of the revolution meant. The truth first began to 
dawn on them when the peace negotiations commenced. Spain, too, 
neither then nor now renowned for her liberal principles, had sided 
with us only to get back from England her Gibraltar, that the strong- 
est fortress in the world might be made the instrument of Latin 
despotism rather than the citadel of Saxon freedom. The govern- 
ments of both France and Spain now began to get some vision of the 
reality. They both insisted that no treaty of peace should be made 
between America and England, except such as they should approve 
of. The Count of Paris, prime minister of France and the ablest 
statesman in it, had, I think, even then, some faint, prophetic 
glimpses of the Bastile and the Commune and the sea of blood which 
was to drench Paris a few years later, as the prelude to a better day 
for France. 

Count Aranda, the representative of Spain in the negotiations, just 
after the treaty was signed, wrote in disgust to his king as follows: 

" This federal republic is born a pigmy. A day will come when it 
will be a giant, even a colossus, formidable even in these countries. 
Liberty of conscience, the facility for establishing a new population 
on immense lands, as well as the advantages of the new government. 



173 

will draw thither farmers and artisans from all the nations. In a few 
years we shall watch with grief the tyrannical existence of this same 
colossus." 

The French and Spanish governments were using all their efforts 
to confine the United States of America within the narrowest possible 
limits. They proposed that it should consist only of a little narrow 
coast strip running from Maine to Georgia and extending back only 
a few hundred miles to the foot hills of the AUeghanies. To accom- 
plish their purpose, they were willing even that their dread enemy, 
England, should extend her Canada from the great lakes down to 
the Ohio river and that the immense territory west of the Cumber- 
land mountains and south of the Ohio, down to the fringe of Spanish 
possessions on the gulf, should be forever devoted to the Indians, 
who. it was proposed, should be under the joint tutelage and domina- 
tion of Spain and the United States. 

We must remember what France and what Spain we were dealing 
with at that time. It was not the France of La Fayette— the French 
government had been careful ever since he came to America to give 
to the gallant marquis no word of encouragement or approbation— or 
the France of Napoleon, or the France of later years, but the France 
of the meanest of the Bourbons. And Spain was the Spain of Philip 
II, the Spain which had been the home of the Inquisition and which 
still maintained it, the Spain which, with its sister, Portugal, ruled 
with absolute sway two-thirds of North America and all of South 
America, the Spain which was steeped in bigotry and superstition, 
the Spain which stood then as now for unmixed despotism over the 
bodies and the minds and the souls of men. Well might she tremble 
at the thought that a republic of Saxon freemen should border on 
her Mexico, where she still maintained the Inquisition, and from 
which she derived the princely revenue of $20,000,000 a year. Per- 
haps her statesmen, too, had some dim vision of the coming struggle 
with the people of Cuba, and surmised that methods such as those 
lately proclaimed by his excellency, Captain-General Weyler, would 
not commend themselves to a neighboring nation that had laid the 
foundations of its greatness upon the bed-rock of eternal liberty. 

In this emergency, when our friends were marshaled in deadly 
array against us, we were saved by our enemies. The peace negoti- 
ations on our side were in charge of Franklin, Jay and Adams, and 
three more adroit champions of human liberty never walked the 
earth. They determined to treat with England alone. In a very 
short time the preliminary treaty of peace was agreed to, acknowl- 
edging the independence of the United States and extending their 
limits westward to the Mississippi, northward to the great lakes, and 
southward to the Spanish possessions on the gulf. . But we had 
promised that no treaty of peace should be finally signed between 

13 



174 

America and England except with the consent of France and Spain, 
and Franklin and Jay and Adams were men who were bound to keep 
the plighted faith of the nation, and so this preliminary treaty stood 
unsigned and unratified until France and Spain could be brought to 
agree to it. And meantime the war outside of the United States 
went on. Our enemy, England, won two great naval victories which 
insured her the control of the West Indies against France, and Gib- 
raltar against Spain. They were won by our enemy, the enemy we 
had been fighting so bitterly for the eight years past; but it was 
those victories, won by Saxon soldiers and sailors, that made 
America. France and Spain were compelled to assent to the terms 
which England and America had agreed upon, and the treaty was 
formally signed and became effective. 

That treaty is, to my mind, the most important act in the history 
of the world. It meant that the Saxon race was to rule the earth and 
Saxon institutions to be a blessing to all humanity. When that 
treaty was made the English language was spoken by barely 20,000,- 
000 people in the whole world. It is now spoken by more than 
120,000,000. When that treaty was signed our language stood fifth 
in the list of European languages in point of the numbers of people 
who spoke it. Spanish, French, German and Russian were each 
spoken by more people than English. To-day the English language 
stands way at the head of the list, and within fifty years it will be 
spoken by more people than all the rest put together. That treaty 
gave North America to the Saxon race, and at the close of this cen- 
tury there will be well on towards 100,000,000 of us here. It was that 
treaty that changed the face of the earth and the course of civiliza- 
tion. It was that treaty that put the Saxon race ahead of the Latin 
and insured Saxon institutions for all time to come. There had been 
a Blenheim and a Yorktown; there was to be a Waterloo. The sun 
of the Latin race from that moment began to decline. All over the 
world privileges began to give way to rights, and absolutism to free 
institutions. 

Well is it for us to celebrate Yorktown and Saratoga and Bunker 
Hill and Lexington. Well to honor the names of those heroes of 
heroes as we are honoring them to-day — Washington and Putnam, 
and Greene and Lincoln. But let us not forget the great part played 
in our struggle by Franklin, Jay and Adams. The treaty which they 
secured did for the country what one hundred Yorktowns could not 
have done for it. It gave a continent to the United States and free- 
dom to humanity. 

And let us not forget, either, that on those little isles in the far 
north, on the other side of the ocean, is a part of that Saxon race which 
has come to rule the earth, and that they speak that glorious English 
language which is bound to become the language of the world. We 



175 

fought the war of the revolution as a fight for freedom on the land, 
for them as for us, and we won it; we fought the war of 1812 as a 
fight for freedom on the ocean, for them as well as for us, and we 
won it; we will fight the war of 1896, if there is occasion to, as a fight 
for the autonomy of a continent, and we will win it. But no war can 
destroy the fact, and let not any prospect of war close our eyes to it, 
that we, all over the world, who trace our lineage to Saxon ancestors 
and speak the English language, are akin, not only in our language 
and blood, but in our institutions, our habits and our hopes; and 
that, without war if it can be, or after war if it must be, it is in the 
ranks, shoulder to shoulder with our Saxon brethren, that we must 
finally stand in the great contest for the establishment throughout 
the earth of free institutions, the regeneration of humanity and the 
amelioration of the conditions of life. We, Sons of the American 
Revolution, descendants of those who fought at Bunker Hill and 
Long Island and Saratoga and Princeton and Yorktown, cannot for- 
get that we are Americans. But we, descendants also of those who 
stood at Runnymede, of those who fought at Marston Moor and at 
Naseby, of those who struggled for long centuries to establish 
Anglican liberty on the other side of the ocean so that we might 
copy it here, and make the copy even better than the original, we 
cannot forget that we are Saxons, too. 

General Kellogg : A telegram came to me this after- 
noon, which I want to read to you : 

New Haven, Conn., February 22, 1896. 
S. W. Kellogg, Chairman : 

I am disappointed in not being with the Sons to-day. Duty marked 
out another course for me, that of presiding over an audience of two 
thousand true Americans of my own city. Extend my best wishes to 
all present. 

" Strange rumblings come down the valley to-day, 
As the sound of artillery, far away." 

S. E. MERWIN, 
President David Humphreys Branch. 

I have also received the following letter, which speaks 

for itself : 

Office of the President-General, 

15 Broad street. New York City, 

December 31, 1895. 
My Dear Mr. Kellogg : I have your very kind letter, and fully 
appreciate the courtesy extended to me in your cordial invitation to 
be present at the S. A. R. banquet of February 22d. I am sorry to 



176 

say that in compliance with a promise made a couple of years ago, I 
am to spend the next Washington's birthday with our Michigan 
society, and speak at their banquet at Detroit. 

Regretting very much that I will not have the pleasure of joining 
my compatriots at Waterbury, and thanking you very much for your 
kindness in communicating with me, I am yours truly, 

HORACE PORTER, 

President-General. 

Letters of regret were also received from Hon. Chaun- 
cey M. Depew, Judge Henry E. Howland, Senator Joseph 
R. Hawley, Isaac H. Bromley and Governor O. Vincent 
Coffin. 

In reply to the message from General Merwin, the fol- 
lowing telegram was sent: 

Waterbury, Conn., February 22, 1896. 

General S. E. Merwin, President David Humphreys Branch, New 
Haven, Conn. 
Your telegram received. The Connecticut Sons, at banquet as- 
sembled, reciprocate most heartily and sincerely you r patriotic and 
poetic sentiments. 

JONATHAN TRUMBULL, President. 

S. W. KELLOGG, Toastmaster. 



SCHOOL PRIZES. 

The committee consisting of Messrs. Jonathan Trum- 
bull, Joseph G. Woodward and Lucius F. Robinson, 
appointed by the board of managers to offer prizes to 
the children of the schools of Connecticut for excellence 
in essays on revolutionary subjects, requested the pupils 
of the High schools to present papers on The Continental 
Congress and the pupils of schools below the grade of 
High schools papers on Burgoyne's Invasion. The selec- 
tions which reached the committee from the principals 
of the schools numbered about one hundred and they 
were for the most part highly creditable to their authors. 



177 

Awards were made as follows, viz.: 

High school division, first prize, twenty dollars, Fred- 
erick Ernest Pierce, New Britain High School, New 
Britain. 

Second prizes, five dollars each : 

Cassius Hinds Watson, Danbury High School, Danbury. 

James A. Holcombe, Shelton, Derby High School, 
Derby. 

Ralph H. Tibbals, Cornwall Bridge, David M. Hunt 
School, Falls Village. 

Edward Francis McGovern, Bridgeport High School, 
Bridgeport. 

Charles E. Weeks, Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport. 

Daisy May Kabel, Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport. 

Honorable mention : 

Julian S. Wooster, Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport. 
James A. Turner, Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport. 
Florice Watkins, South Manchester. 

Common school division, first prize, twenty dollars. 

Lyman Beecher Stowe, Simsbury, Second North School, 
Hartford. 

Second prizes, five dollars each : 

Julie M. Morrow, Broadway School, Norwich. 

Robert Bulkeley, New Street School, Danbury. 

Walter B. Sherwood, Arsenal School, Hartford. 

Emily Townsend Sanford, New Street School, Danbury. 

Thomas H. Knott, Copper Hill No. 5 District School, 
East Granby. 

Clara Grossman, Corner School, Meriden. 

Honorable mention : 

Margery M. Whipple, Broadway School, Norwich. 
Evelyn B. Robertson, Brown School, Hartford. 
A. Ernest Cherry, Broadway School, Norwich. 
Agnes C. Dow, South School, Hartford. 

J. G. WOODWARD, 

Historian. 




THE DEFAMATION OF REVOLUTION- 
ARY PATRIOTS. 

[Read by Jonathan Trumbull before the Ruth Wyllys Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, at Hartford, October 31, 1895.] 

In these days, when the history of the American revolution is so 
thoroughly exploited, it behooves the writer whose tendencies are 
iconoclastic to beware of drawing upon his imagination for his facts, 
or of drawing false conclusions from his premises. There appears to 
be an increasing tendency among writers of the day rudely to break 
as many as possible of the images which the Sons and Daughters of 
the American Revolution have been worshipping, which tendency 
would be alarming if all these images were positively known to be 
breakable. It is the purpose of this paper to cite a few instances of 
this same tendency, in the hope that it may be incidentally shown 
that some of the images which have been dashed to earth still remain 
uninjured. 

It is no part of our purpose to impugn the motives of those who are 
interesting themselves in attempts to expose the mistakes and mis- 
deeds of our ancestors of the revolution. It is to be assumed that 
these writers feel that they have a mission to fulfill. If we are, as one 
of the results of this mission, to have the history of the revolution 
shorn of misstatements and cleared from false impressions, let the 
good work go on ! If individual men or parties of men have been 
falsely glorified for a century or more, the sooner their glorification is 
ended, the better. Let justice be done though the heavens fall; let 
us have true history and true biography, even if in having them it 
becomes necessary to hold up every patriot of the revolution to the 
odium of the present enlightened generation! All honor to the histo- 
rian who succeeds in correcting old, or in making new history! But 
no enthusiasm of discovery can excuse the historian who deals care- 
lessly with that most precious possession of the living, and most 
sacred bequest of the dead, personal reputation. 

It is difficult to account for what appears to be just such careless 
dealing on the part of certain writer§ who must be quoted, except 



179 

upon the supposition that they have established a theory or espoused 
a party, and in their eagerness to sustain the theory or to champion 
the party, they seize upon every real or imaginary indication which 
may strengthen their view of a given case. They appear disposed to 
treat their subjects impartially, but as their statements are usually 
ex parte, they have before them the difficult task of coupling a parti- 
san spirit with an impartial spirit, a union which finds its illustration 
in a certain pair of horses which the owner insisted were well mated 
because one of them was very eager to do all the work and the other 
perfectly willing to allow him to do it. 

Foremost among the parties championed by the modern reformer 
of history are the tories — I beg their pardon — the loyalists of the rev- 
olution. The enthusiasm of the champions of this unfortunate party 
has become so infectious that it is with some embarrassment that I 
am forced to cite as a rather striking instance the fact that at a meet- 
ing of a certain society of Sons of the American Revolution, it was 
officially reported that an important feature of the work of a branch 
of that society was a discussion which reached the conclusion that 
the tory party was a highly respectable and much villified one, enti- 
tled to be honored in every way by the descendants of the patriots of 
the revolution. Admitting that the war of the revolution is over, and 
that the tories are as much entitled as any party to their proper place 
in history, it still seems a little strange that such a discussion should 
be regarded with the innocent pride with which it was reported as ap- 
propriate work for a society whose avowed purpose is to honor the 
patriots of the revolution. 

Since this discussion took place in a city less than a hundred miles 
from Hartford, it is but natural to suspect that the process known as 
the contagion of thought may have had something to do with it, and 
that the germs of this contagion may be traced to a chapter on the 
Loyalists m Professor Ferguson's " Essays in American History." I 
use the word contagion in a thoroughly Pickwickian sense, fully 
aware that there may be such a thing as wholesome contagion, though 
not fully convinced that the influence in question should be classed 
as such. 

The keynote of these Essays in American History appears to be 
struck in the following words, which the author uses in his preface : 
" . . . . it is a matter for congratulation that at the present 
" day the subject can be treated with greater impartiality and that it 
" is no longer necessary for American writers to make up for the polit- 
' ' ical and literary insignificance of their country by boasting either 
* ' of the vastness of their continent or of the Spartan virtue of their 
'* ancestors." 

It is no part of our purpose to discuss the existence, at any time 
in our country's history, of such a dire necessity as that which Pro- 



i8o 

fessor Ferguson points out; and it is not necessary to discuss the 
conclusions he reaches regarding the loyalists, of whose social, moral 
and political position he gives us a glowing account in a very able 
ex parte statement. Quite probably he is correct in the conclusion 
that as a class they were men of greater wealth and higher social 
position than the rank and file of the patriots. There is no doubt 
that they were unfortunate, that their services were never duly com- 
pensated by the British, and that they were not treated by the 
patriots with that careful consideration for their personal comfort 
and respect for their political views which it is to be inferred should, 
under some unknown code of military usage, be accorded by bellig- 
erents to the most dangerous of enemies, internal foes in time of 
war. 

In the course of this special pleading in behalf of the tories, it is 
not to be expected that their champion will accord very favorable 
treatment to their enemies, and our expectations in this respect have 
not misled us. As we read the epithet " so-called patriots " applied 
to the men of Massachusetts in the early stages of the history of the 
struggle, we are inclined to enter a modest protest, as in other similar 
instances. But we must remember that it is with the historical 
accuracy of certain statements regarding the patriots that we have 
to deal, and to that let us turn our attention. 

In the mention made of the patriots of Massachusetts during the 
long period preceding the outbreak of the war, we read, "... the 
" cause of American rights was disgraced, year after year, by riots, 
" murder (the italics are my own), arson and sedition." The charge 
of murder occurring annually is a serious one, even in times of such 
political agitation and provocation to violence as those referred to. 
In answer to this charge it is only necessary to ask the accuser to 
point to a single instance of murder, or even of bloodshed which can 
be laid to the charge of the patriots during the time and in the place 
referred to. It is a remarkable fact that when her citizens were shot 
down by British soldiers in the streets of Boston, no retaliation in 
kind should have occurred; so remarkable that we can only infer 
that they are accused of murder on general principles; but until we 
see proof to the contrary we must insist that this charge is unknown 
to history. 

We now come to the treatment of the patriots in this essay as com- 
pared with the tories in the matter of raids on defenseless towns, and 
illegitimate warfare in general. Another question of historical accu- 
racy arises when we read these words : 

" But it is an undoubted fact that there were outrages on both 
sides, bad treatment of prisoners on both sides, guerrilla warfare with 
all its evil concomitants on both sides, and in these respects the 
tories were no worse than the whigs." 



i8i 

Admitting that a statement of this kind cannot be proved or 
disproved by any of the fundamental rules of arithmetic, I believe 
its inaccuracy to be susceptible of proof to any intelligent and 
disinterested jury hearing all the evidence. It is a significant fact 
that, in summing up this evidence only the single event of Sullivan's 
campaign through the Indian country is cited by the author as a par- 
allel to the massacres of Cherry Valley, Wyoming, Groton Heights, 
and the wanton attacks on the defenseless towns of Danbury, Ridge- 
field, New Haven, Norwalk, Fairfield in our own state, Falmouth in 
Maine, and Portsmouth and Norfolk in Virginia. The injustice of such 
a comparison is evident. Sullivan's campaign through the Indian 
country was a military necessity, and served as a wholesome preven- 
tive of a repetition of such unspeakable horrors as the Cherry Valley 
massacre, which, unless prevented by just such vigorous measures as 
Sullivan employed would have resulted in adding similar instances 
to the long score against the tories. No such reason can be assigned 
for any one of the barbarous raids by the British which I have 
enumerated. To no one of these horrors can be assigned a legiti- 
mate purpose of civilized warfare. They can be traced to no motive 
which could justify, excuse or palliate them as military advantages 
of any consequence whatever. A significant comparison might be 
made in this connection between the capture of Stony Point by the 
gallant Anthony Wayne, and the capture of Groton Heights by the 
forces under Arnold. In the brilliant engagement which resulted in 
the capture of Stony Point, not a man was killed except in the thick 
of the fight, though the laws of European warfare at the time would 
have justified the butchery of the entire garrison, and the knowledge 
of the barbarous proceedings in Virginia was fresh in the minds of 
the patriots. With this example before them, we all know how the 
British proceeded two years later at Groton, where the gallant Led- 
yard was slain by the sword he surrendered, and no quarter was 
given his heroic band. 

But we must resist the temptation to make further comparisons. 
Up to this point the score against the tories is a long one, and it is in 
no way shortened by the additional comparisons which the author 
makes, offering as he does a Cowboy as an equivalent for a Skinner, 
and Marion and Sumter as equivalents for Ferguson and Simcoe, 
without citing any instances of the doings of either. If a parallel 
could be found in the warfare of the sturdy Sumter and the chival- 
rous Marion for the massacre of fifty of the men of Pulaski's legion 
by the forces in command of Ferguson, the score against the tories 
would be in no way reduced; and in this condition we will leave it. 
It must be remarked, however, that it is just a little strange that, as 
an additional argument in defense of the tories in this connection, 
these words should be used : 



l82 

'• The Americans, however, do not deserve any credit for abstain- 
" ing from the use of Indian allies. They tried very hard to make 
" use of them, but without success." 

It is difficult to determine the precise bearing of this remark upon 
the subject. It would seem that it appears necessary, after roundly 
denouncing the patriots for what they did, to appeal to the imagina- 
tion for what they might have done had they had the opportunity. 
We are, perhaps, expected to pursue a course of argument which 
once involved even the genius of Mark Twain in a hopeless tangle of 
difficulties by proceeding upon the postulate that " the intention, not 
the act, constitutes the crime, hence constitutes the deed." In fear 
of similar consequences, we will drop this portion of the argument, 
if it is an argument. 

Another unproved statement which we may safely challenge is in 
reference to the town committees in their dealings with the tories, 
where we read that " they proceeded on principles of evidence which 
would have shocked and scandalized a grand inquisitor." We have 
heard, perhaps, of an historical parallel between Hannibal and 
Annie Laurie, but never before, I imagine, of a comparison between 
a grand inquisitor and a revolutionary patriot, in which the grand 
inquisitor shines, by contrast, as a pattern of administrative justice. 
The question is, how does he do it ? And this question can only be 
appropriately answered by the accuser of the patriot. 

These few instances of the treatment of the patriots by this 
author are all that can be submitted within the present limits. They 
have been chosen as illustrations of the defamation of the patriots of 
the revolution, not from any belief that their author would know- 
ingly or wilfully do injustice to such men, but from the belief that, in 
arguing the case of the royalists, he has very naturally published 
mistaken views regarding their opponents. 

What the distinguished historian, John Fiske, has done in a lecture 
none too long, yet occupying an hour and a half in deliver3% I shall 
quite certainly not attempt to do in the few minutes which can be 
devoted to Professor Peabody's article on " Boston mobs before the 
Revolution" in the Atlantic Monthly, for September, 1888. This 
article enumerates the " Boston tea-party " among these mobs, giving 
that historic event a distinction, with but little, if any difference, from 
the disgraceful riot which resulted in the sacking of Goveror Hutchin- 
son's residence. Fiske treats the subject quite exhaustively in his 
own inimitable way, showing conclusively that the Boston tea-party 
was the last resort of determined, intelligent and respectable men, 
who had exhausted every other means of asserting their rights. This 
lecture, like all of Fiske's writings, has, no doubt, found a permanent 
place in the historical literature of our country, so that it is only 
necessary to refer to it as a most able correction of a false conclusion 



i83 

of Professor Peabody's, entirely unwarranted by the political situa- 
tion and by the facts in the case. It must be insisted that the result 
of this false conclusion is to defame the patriots of the revolution in 
their connection with the Boston tea-party, which result has been 
ably and happily frustrated by the scholarly treatment which Fiske 
has given it. It should be noted in passing, that Professor Peabody 
develops an admiration for the tories, which, together with his out- 
spoken protest against a monument to Crispus Attucks, gives his 
short treatise a bias which produces the usual result of defeating 
impartial treatment of his subject. 

Probably no one of the thirteen original states was as active, alert 
and efficient in the restraint of tories during the war as our own state 
of Connecticut. In this the intelligence of our legislation was shown, 
as in the liberal treatment accorded to the tories after the conclusion 
of the war, as has been ably shown in Professor Ferguson's essay on 
the loyalists. No sooner did Ralph Isaacs, for example, send "some 
fine blackfish to Governor Brown," or some tea and other luxuries to 
Governor Franklin, both of whom were confined at Middletown, than 
the fact was reported to the general assembly, and after a hearing 
in which, perhaps, the principles of evidence "would have shocked 
and scandalized a grand inquisitor," Mr. Isaac's case received care- 
ful treatment. Not only did Connecticut effectively restrain internal 
enemies within her own borders, but received them, to be cared for, 
from other states less competent to provide for them, as in the case 
of Governor Franklin of New Jersey. Can it be possible that, during 
the entire period of the revolution, such a state as Connecticut could 
have maintained a tory in a high and responsible official position 
affording him peculiar facilities for acquainting himself with the pro- 
ceedings and military movements of the state ? If certain sources of 
information which ought to be authoritative are correct, this is pre- 
cisely what Connecticut did. Turning to Appleton's Encyclopaedia 
of American Biography, under the name George Wyllys, and ap- 
pended to his remarkable record of sixty-four years' service as secre- 
tary of state, we read : 

" Notwithstanding that he was in active sympathy with the loyalist 
element during the revolution, his tenure of office was not inter- 
rupted. " 

This statement is evidently taken from Dexter's Yale biographies, 
where it appears in almost identical language, unaccompanied by 
any reference to authorities. 

This being the case, the statement should not remain any longer 
unchallenged. Allow me to suggest that the Ruth Wyllys Chapter 
of Daughters of the American Revolution should appoint a committee 
to wait upon Professor Dexter, and insist upon proof that the father- 
in-law of this chapter's patron saint was a tory who was base enough to 



184 

act in the service and receive the pay of his enemies during the entire 
war. This question is of such importance as a matter of Connecticut 
history, affecting the record of the state, and, as it now stands, blot- 
ting the fair fame of George Wyllys, that no time should be lost in 
bringing it to final proof or disproof. 

It may be added that the evidence thus far points to disproof of 
this surprising statement. Dr. Charles J. Hoadly, to whom I am 
indebted for calling my attention to this statement, finds, among the 
wealth of historical resources at his command, no shadow of proof of 
the toryism of George Wyllys. And even Miss Talcott, who has 
made a special study of the Wyllys family, resulting in the admirable 
paper which the Ruth Wyllys Chapter has published, finds no indi- 
cation which points, in the slightest degree, to a suspicion of the 
patriotism and rectitude of George Wyllys. 

Up to this point in our investigations we find that, if we leave the 
patriots of the revolution to the tender mercies of some members of 
the faculties of our higher institutions of learning, the patriots will 
receive rather rough treatment at the hands of these gentlemen. Let 
us hope, however, that notwithstanding the views and statements 
emanating from members of the faculties of Trinity, Harvard and 
Yale, we may still number a few friends of the patriots among those 
who have charge of the training of our young men, even in these 
institutions; and especially let us hope that such of these young men 
as are descendants of patriots of the revolution may not learn at these 
institutions to deride or utterly despise their ancestors. 

The most recent and the final specimen which is to be exhibited is 
one which I must apologize for introducing, owing to the personal 
interest which attaches to it. It forms, however, an example so 
striking of the treatment of the patriots by a writer of the day, 
and is of such interest as a matter of Connecticut history, that, 
while it particularly interests a descendant of the accused, it can 
hardly fail to attract the attention of the Connecticut Daughters and 
Sons of the American Revolution as well. 

Mr. Paul L. Ford, the accuser in this instance, is well known as a 
compiler of American documentary history and as the author of a 
recent novel which deserves the highest commendation from all who 
feel a pride in the distinctively American fiction of the day. By this 
I do not mean to intimate that he has mistakenly adopted a 
romancer's license in treating of the historical subject we are about 
to consider. I am only impressed with the belief that he has, in this 
instance, drawn a false conclusion from his premises. In the 
Atlantic Monthly for last May, Mr. Ford contributed a paper on the 
intrigues of Benjamin Rush in his attacks on Washington at the time 
of the Conway cabal, and, apropos of these intrigues and other 
attacks on Washington, says : 



i85 

" Yet not merely have these been forgotten, but the very descend- 
ants of the men who were bitterest in their attacks upon him have 
most carefully avoided reviving the facts, and have actually taken 
every means in their power to suppress and destroy all proofs of 
such antagonism. As an instance of this, the biographies of Samuel 
and John Adams, of Elbridge Gerry, of Jonathan and John Trumbull, 
and of Richard Henry Lee, as well as such materials as exist con- 
cerning James Lovell, William Williams, Daniel Roberdeau, and 
Francis Lightfoot Lee, are either silent or absolutely deny that these 
several men were concerned in the attempt to remove Washington 
from the command of the army at one of the most critical moments 
of the revolution." 

Once more I must apologize for selecting from this formidable list 
only the names of those in whom I have a personal interest. The 
rather sweeping assertion of Mr. Ford regarding their descendants 
places me in a position where a word of personal explanation is 
needed from me as a lineal descendant of one of the accused, a col- 
lateral descendant of another, and a relative by marriage of a third. 
I can only say that, never having had the facts, or any trace of the 
facts, regarding the connection of these men with the Conway cabal, 
in my possession, and that never having had any knowledge of the 
existence of these facts, it has been impossible for me to avoid reviv- 
ing them, or to suppress them, or to destroy any proof of them. All 
of which has been submitted to Mr. Ford, with the assurance that I 
would not, knowingly, spoil even a joke, much less spoil history, for 
relationship's sake, and with the request that he would direct me to 
sources of information which show that Jonathan Trumbull, his son 
John, and his son-in-law, William Williams, were concerned in an 
" attempt to remove Washington from the command of the army at 
one of the most critical moments of the revolution." 

To this inquiry I have the following reply: 

"The Conway cabal drew into it men of very diverse views, and 
even some who later supported Washington. The Trumbulls fell 
into that party from two, if not more motives, the first being intense 
dislike and jealousy of Schuyler and the New York influence gen- 
erally; the second, disapproval of Washington's demand for a three 
years' army, the New England feeling being for a Continental enlist- 
ment annually, and a main reliance on militia rather than on a regu- 
lar army. They were also affronted by the treatment of Joseph Trum- 
bull, and used his criticisms of St. Clair as a means for removing 
Schuyler. I have never been able to unearth William Williams' mo- 
tives, but presume it was his relationship with the Trumbulls, as well 
as his New England tinge." 



i86 

This is, of course, interesting, but it assumes a knowledge on the 
part of the reader of facts of which he has no knowledge at all, that 
is to say, facts that show that these men, by any known acts of theirs, 
were in any way connected with the miserable intrigue. It is one 
thing to say that they were surrounded by certain influences, but it 
is quite another thing to prove that they yielded to those influences. 
Further inquiries for proofs meeting with no response from Mr. Ford, 
I have consulted the best authorities at my command, but find no 
indication that any of these men were connected with the Conway 
cabal. The official correspondence of Governor Trumbull with Gen- 
eral Schuyler makes free mention of the feeling of New England 
soldiers engaged in the Northern campaign of 1777. with expressions 
of deep regret on the part of the governor that such feeling should 
exist, and assurances that no effort should be spared on his part to 
overcome it. Indeed, if Governor Trumbull cherished an ''intense 
jealousy and dislike of Schuyler," the correspondence lays Trumbull 
open to the charge of hypocrisy, as an instance of which, let me quote 
a few words from one of his letters to Schuyler: 

"That you have sent to congress a resignation of your command, 
that you are obliged to vindicate your character by publishing a nar- 
rative of your conduct, are matters that I can hear of but with deep 
concern. I make no doubt of your ability to justify yourself, yet fear 
the consequences of such an appeal, at this time especially. I wish 
to see your character stand as fair with the world as it does with me, 
but cannot wish that congress should accept your resignation, that 
your ability and zeal should be lost to the country when she most 
needs them. . . ." 

From the correspondence of Washington and Trumbull at this 
time, no indication of any abatement either of personal regard on the 
part of Trumbull, or of any intention to do otherwise than to assist 
him most effectively, can be found. 

It is hardly necessary to repeat, in substance, similar absence of 
proof in the case of Col. John Trumbull. At the time of the Con- 
way cabal, he was a young, ambitious man of twenty-one, possessed 
of a certain self-assertiveness, not to say self-conceit, which is by no 
means uncommon, even to-day, in young men of that age. I cannot 
forgive him for resigning and returning his commission at about this 
time because its date did not suit his notions of military courtesy, 
any more than I can forgive his father for joining with the president 
of Harvard College in trying to dissuade him from pursuing the 
career of an artist, unless the shrewd old gentleman considered at 
the time that his son's character was such that opposition would only 
strengthen his adherence to a given course of action. But we need 
some more substantial proof of his connection with the Conway cabal 



i87 



than the fact that he resigned his commission as he did, or even that 
the sycophantic Gates wrote in his fulsome way to the governor allud- 
ing to his son's resignation as a loss sustained by him (Gates) in hav- 
ing him "torn from his friend," meaning himself. 

On the whole, such investigations as I have been able to make of 
statements derogatory to the characters of men who have hitherto 
been regarded as the patriots of the revolution, lead me to believe 
that such statements may always be regarded with suspicion and 
that they will seldom, if ever, bear the tests to which they should be 
subjected. It may be that the Sons and Daughters of the American 
Revolution are introducing into this country a mythology of a new 
kind; but I confess I incline to Carlyle's opinion that we do not see 
enough of hero worship of the right kind. It is certainly infinitely 
better than mammon worship or self worship, and will result in a 
race of sturdier patriots than we can derive from any other source; 
certainly sturdier and more wholesome than a race which devotes 
itself to a buzzard-like search for the unsavory things of American 
history. 





AN EXAMINATION OF THE CHARGE 
OF TREASON AGAINST GENERAL 
SAMUEL HOLDEN PARSONS. 



Read before the Connecticut Historical Society, May 5, 1896, 
By JOSEPH GURLEY WOODWARD. 

In Winsor's admirable Narrative and Critical History of America, 
a note attached to the account of the trial of Andre is as follows : 
" It is only within a few years, and since the publication of Clinton's 
Record of the Secret Service of Headquarters, that it has been 
known that Gen. S. H. Parsons, of Connecticut, was at this time (the 
time of trial of Andre) acting as a spy for the British general. 
Andre, who saw him in the court, may have known this."* 

A careless yielding to the temptation to set forth a highly dramatic 
situation has led the author of this note not only to accept the guilt 
of Parsons as fully established, but into a serious chronologic blunder 
also, about which there can be no question whatever. There was no 
traitor upon the bench of the court, while a relatively innocent man, 
possessed of a knowledge of the guilt of his judge, was tried for his 
life. For the trial of Andre took place in 1780, and the only evidence 
against Parsons, the secret service record of Sir Henry Clinton, 
shows that his treasonable correspondence, if he was guilty, began 
in 1781, the following year. 

To state in full the evidence against General Parsons, and to weigh 
it, is the purpose of this paper. 

The Rev. Jonathan Parsons, the father of the general, was the 
grandson of Deacon Benjamin Parsons, a settler at Springfield in 
1636. He was the minister of the church at Lyme, Connecticut, from 
1 73 1 to 1745. When Whitefield came to Connecticut he became one 
of his most ardent supporters and himself went on a preaching tour 
and held revival meetings. His course so scandalized a part of his 
congregation that he was compelled to resign. He went to ^New- 



*Vol. vi, p. 460. 



189 

buryport, Massachusetts, where, years after, Whitefield died at his 
house. The Rev. Jonathan Parsons married Phoebe Griswold, a 
sister of Governor Matthew Griswold and a descendant of Henry 
Wolcott, of Windsor, the founder of the most illustrious family of 
Connecticut. From this union sprang Samuel Holden Parsons, in- 
heriting on the one side a tendency toward fervid radicalism, and on 
the other qualities which make for natural leadership among men. 
He was born at Lyme, May 14, 1737, graduated at Harvard in 1756, 
studied law in the office of his uncle, Matthew Griswold, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1759. He was chosen a deputy to the general 
assembly from Lyme in 1762, and re-elected annually until his re- 
moval to New London in 1774. He was appointed by the general 
assembly a member of the revolutionary committee of correspond- 
ence in 1773; and in that year he wrote a letter to Samuel Adams 
suggesting a Continental Congress, in which he said : " The idea of 
inalienable allegiance to any prince or state is an idea to me inad- 
missable; and I cannot see but that our ancestors, when they first 
landed in America, were as independent of the crown or king of 
Great Britain as if they had never been his subjects."* He was 
appointed king's attorney in 1773, but on the outbreak of hostilities 
he resigned the office with its emoluments. To the Boston commit- 
tee of defense, he wrote in 1774 : " We consider the cause the com- 
mon cause of all the colonies, and doubt not the concurrence of all to 
defend and support you. Let us play the man for the cause of our 
country, and trust the event to Him who orders all events for the 
best good of His people." f 

He early took an interest in military affairs, and was major of the 
Third regiment in 1770, lieutenant-colonel in 1774, and colonel in 

1775- 

When New England was startled by the shots fired at Lexington, 
he set out for the scene of the conflict at the head of a company from 
New London. Later, on the way to Hartford, where he arrived 
April 27, 1775, he fell in with Benedict Arnold, who gave him an 
account of the state of affairs at Ticonderoga, and of the great 
number of brass cannon there. With Col. Samuel Wyllys and Silas 
Deane, he formed a project for taking the fort. Joined by three 
others, they borrowed money from the colonial treasury on their 
individual obligations for fitting out the expedition, which, under 
command of Ethan Allen, surprised and captured the fort on the 
morning of the loth of May. ^ He participated in the battle of Long 
Island in command of a brigade, and was made a brigadier-general 



* Magazine of American History^ January, 1889. 

+ Magazine of A merican History^ vol. xxi. 

% Collections Connecticut Historical Society^ vol. i, p. 181. 

14 



190 

for gallant service. He was also at Harlem Heights and at White 
Plains and with Washington in New Jersey. In 1778-9 he com- 
manded the troops in the Highlands. In 1778 General Tryon ad- 
dressed him as a "revolted subject of Great Britain," to which 
Parsons responded, " A justifiable resistance against unwarrantable 
invasions of the natural and social rights of mankind, if unsuccessful, 
according to the fashion of the world, will be termed rebellion, but if 
successful, will be deemed a noble struggle for the defense of every- 
thing valuable in life. Whether I am considered as a revolted sub- 
ject of the king of Great Britain, or in any other light by his subjects, 
is very immaterial, and gives me little concern. Future ages, I hope, 
will do justice to my intentions, and the present to the humanity of 
my conduct."* 

He was one of the board before which Andre was brought in 1780. 
In the same year he was made a major-general and succeeded to 
Putnam's command. A successful attack upon the enemy near New 
York won for him the thanks of congress February 5, 1781. 

From the fight at Lexington until the war was practically con- 
cluded by the surrender of Cornwallis he was continually in service. 
He resigned from the army in 1782 and entered upon the practice of 
law at Middletown. In 1785 he was appointed a commissioner to 
treat with the Miami Indians. He was an active member of the con- 
vention which ratified the constitution in 1788, and in the same year 
was appointed the first judge of the northwest territory. In 1789 he 
was one of a commission appointed to treat with the Wyandottes for 
their rights to the Connecticut Western Reserve. While returning 
to his home at Marietta from a meeting with Wyandotte chiefs, he 
was drowned in the rapids of the Big Beaver, November 17, 1789. 

Hinman says: " He filled various places of great trust and impor- 
tance at different periods of his life, the duties of which he dis- 
charged with acknowledged ability and fidelity." 

Senator George F. Hoar, in his centennial oration at Marietta in 
1888, spoke of him as "soldier, scholar, judge, one of the strongest 
arms on which Washington leaned, who first suggested the continen- 
tal congress, from the story of whose life could almost be written the 
story of the northern war." This brief sketch of the man against 
whom the charge of treason has been brought shows him to have 
been "an early and a wise and a resolute patriot," f who did not 
shrink from pecuniary sacrifice, or hesitate to incur the dangers of 
the field for his country's sake. His employments in the public 
service when the war was done prove that he had won the respect 
and confidence of his fellowmen. 



* Magazine of Atnerican History^ vol. xxi. 

^ Bancroft'' s History of the U. S,^ vol. vi, p. 283. 



191 

A manuscript volume — A Record of Private Intelligence — kept at 
the headquarters of Sir Henry Clinton when he was in command at 
New York and which came down in his family, was brought to light 
at an auction sale in 1882, and passed into the possession of Thomas 
Addis Emmett of New York. The record begins January 20, 178 1, 
and extends to the following July. It contains mainly information 
derived from spies and secret agents. Its contents, edited with care 
and learning by Edward F. DeLancey, were printed a dozen years 
ago in the Magazine of American History. The entries which 
refer to General Parsons follow. 

* March 11, 1781, "Mr. H. says General Parsons' aid-de-Camp, 
whose name is Lawrence f is soliciting leave to come in to see his 
mother. He thinks it is in our power to tamper with him and that 
from Parsons' mercenary disposition there js little doubt of success." 

24th April, 1 78 1. 

\ Sir — The business I had to negotiate with Gen'l P s, after my 

return home, I paid the utmost attention to, and in order to break 
the ice (as says the vulgar adage) I found myself under the necessity 
of summoning what little address I was master of, in order to 
secure myself a retreat, should the matter I had to propose prove 

disagreeable to P s. Therefore after giving him a satisfactory 

account of my commercial negotiation (which I knew would be 
alluring to him) I introduced the other branch of my business in 
the following manner. I told him that in justice to the confidence 
he reposed in me, I conceived myself in duty bound to conceal no 
material circumstance from him which may in any respect affect 
him. Impressed with this sense I begged leave to communicate the 
substance of a conversation I had with a gentleman at New York, 
whom I knew to be in the highest confidence with the commander- 
in-chief. This gentleman, I told him, hearing of my being in town 
with a flag and knowing I had many friends in it, who, notwith- 
standing our differing in political sentiments, were attached to me, 
he, therefore made use of some of them to acquaint me that he 
wished for an interview for the purpose of conferring on a subject 
the nature of which was in no way inconsistent with strict honor. I 
accordingly waited on him at the appointed hour when a conversa- 
tion of the following import occurred : 

"I understand," said the gentleman, "that you are intimately 

acquainted with G Par— s." I answered in the affirmative. 

"Don't you judge him to be a gentleman possessed of too much 



* Magazine of Afnerican History., vol. x, p. 503. 

t Lieut . Oliver Lawrence of Lamb's artillery was detailed as an aid to General Par 
sons and paid as such by Connecticut. He was of a Long Island family. 
% Magazine 0/ Ainerican History., vol. xi, p. 62. 



192 

understanding and liberality of sentiment to think that the welfare 
of his country consists in an unnatural alliance with the Enemies to 
the Protestant religion, a perfidious nation, with whom no faith can 
be long kept, as all the nations of Europe have experienced?" I 
answered that I knew G — 1 P — s to be a Gentleman of abilities, but 
could not judge of his feelings toward that nation, otherwise than by 
observing no great cordiality subsisting between him and the gentry 
of that nation, in our service. "The terms offered by the parent 
state," continued the gentleman, " are so liberal and generous, that I 
wonder at any gentleman of an enlarged and liberal mind giving his 
assistance in prolonging the calamities of his Country, and as General 
P — s is well known to possess these talents as well as great influence 
in the army and country, Government would wish to make use of him 
for the laudable and honorable purpose of lending his aid in termin- 
ating this unhappy war in an amicable Reunion with the parent State; 
should he undertake it. Government will amply reward him, both in 
a lucrative and honorary way and manner — "besides," I super-added, 
' ' making a provision for his son. " Thus, Sir, have I been necessitated 
to use all this circumlocution in order to convince him of the delicacy 
observed in making the above propositions, and that nothing was in- 
tended inconsistent with the purest principles of honor. 

During this conversation I observed that he listened with uncom- 
mon attention, and as it grew very late, he said it was a matter 
which required deliberation; he therefore postponed it to another 
opportunity. 

Next morning he sent for me and resumed the subject of our last 
or preceding night's discourse. He said he had weighed the matter 
and found himself, upon the strictest examination, disposed to a 
reconciliation and to effect which he would use his influence and lend 
his aid to promote it, but that he saw the embarrassments in his way 
in regard to inculcating such principles in the army, though he did 
not doubt but in time he could bring the officers of the Connecticut 
line over to his opinion. That in order to effect it he thought he 
could do it more to the purpose by resigning his Commission, which 
would save every appearance of those honorary ideas, inseparable 
from the military profession; that he would draw after him the 
officers above referred to, who look up to him as a father, and that 
their joint influence would be exerted among the citizens, which 
would turn the tables in favor of Government in our State, but in 
consideration of those services, he must have a reasonable and meet 
compensation for his commission, it being all he had to depend 
upon. 

Thus, Sir, have I given you a faithful account of this business and 
shall wait on you for your further direction at any hour you may 
please to appoint, when I may have the honor of relating other cir- 



193 

cumstances relative to it, which would be rather tedious to commit to 
writing. I shall be in a situation this summer (I hope) to render 
essential service, having carried my election against Judge Sanford, 
who is one of the first families in the place. It is needless to observe 
that in the general assembly of Connecticut, enter all the material 
concerns of our political system; that secret advices from Congress, 
from Washington, and from abroad, are there canvassed, the early 
knowledge of which may be of consequence in order to avail your- 
self of it. I am, etc. ys, 

W. u.t 

To Major DeLancey, &c., &c. 

25th April, 1781. 

* Memorandums taken of a conversation with Hiram. § 

He promises to get from General Pa — s the following information: 

The exact state of West Point. 

What Troops. 

What Magazines. 

What new Works and how many Guns. 

Who commands. 

If there is a boom below Fort Clinton. 

He is to let me know what P — s' wish is, how we can serve him 
and the methods he means to point out himself. He is to tell him 
he can no way serve us so well as continuing in the army; that the 
higher his command, the more material service he can render. He 
is to promise him great rewards for any services he may do us. He 
is to hold up the idea of Monk to him, and that we expect from his 
services an end to the War. That during the time he continues in 
their army he shall have a handsome support, and should he be 
obliged to fly, to remind him of the Example and situation of Arnold. 
I am to hear from him on Friday next, when he will let me know how 
far he has operated on Pa — s. I shall tell him further what steps to 
take. He is to go to Hartford and attend the Assembly, from whence 
he will collect minutes, and in the month of June will transmit them 
to the General. He makes no doubt of bringing Par— s to do what 
we wish. 

New York, Sunday, 17th June, 1781. 

f Sir — Being somewhat recovered from the fatiguing riding last 
night till 12 o'clock, I sit down to give you the heads only (to avoid 
prolixity) of such matters as have fallen within my observation since 
I had the pleasure of seeing you last. Soon after my return home, I 
prepared dispatches for you and left them at the appointed place, 
and I find they are taken away, but whether by Bulkley, or any other 



* Magazine of A merican History ^ vol. xi, p. 64. 
^Magazine of American History^ vol. xi. p. 254. 
X William Heron. 
§ William Heron. 



194 

person, I know not. They contained amongst other matters an 
account of the intended route of the French troops, the place of their 
destination and the ground on which they were to encamp Like- 
wise an account of the state of West Point and its dependencies. 

This early notice I had from G 1 P s, who had it from the 

French officers who had been viewing the place of encampment. 
A few days afterwards (i. e.) the 8th ult, : I set out for Hartford 
where I attended the Assembly, and left it the week before last, in 
order to give you the earliest account of those matters, which deserve 

attention. Letters of G 1 Washington of the loth and 12th ult.: 

addressed to the Governor and Assembly, were laid before the house 
on the 14th, same month; setting forth the deplorable state of the 
troops at West Point and its dependencies, for want of Provisions; 
subsisting several days on half allowance, and at last reduced to 
quarter allowance. The daily issues to the army, and its fol- 
lowers, were 8000 Rations. Gen'l Heath, who brought the dis- 
patches, and was sent to the Eastern States in order to urge them 
to a sense of their danger, declared before the Assembly, the Gar- 
rison at West Point must inevitably fall. At that critical moment. 
Sir, I found myself in need of a Confidential friend out of doors 
who could be improved for the purpose of conveying hither this' 
state of facts; but it being early in the session, I dare not leave my 
Post, The Assembly ordered a scanty supply of Provisions imme- 
diately and I believe they have but a bare supply from day to day 
ever since. You doubtless know that Washington and the French 
officers from Newport hold a Convention at Wethersfield on the 19th 
ult. for the purpose of settling the plan of operations for the ensuing 
Campaign. On the 24th, when the Convention arose, we had a long 
letter from Gen'l Washington read in the House, containing the 
result of their deliberations, at Wethersfield, the substance of which 
is this : — The French troops he says are to march from Newport to 
Hudson's River as soon as circumstances will admit (meaning the 
article of forrage; Land Carriage, &c.) and begs that the French agent 
may be assisted in making the necessary preparations for their 
accommodation in the several towns through which they were to 
march. He adds that it is the opinion of the most experienced 
French and American officers that this is the time for availing them- 
selves of the weakness of the enemy at New York. The constant 
draining of troops from that garrison to the Southern States invites 
us (he says) to improve the critical moment. Our allies here expect 
our most vigorous exertions in co-operating with them, and our allies 
in Europe will be astonished at our supineness and inactivity should 
we not improve this favorable opportunity. Therefore in order to 
carry our plan of operations into complete execution it is agreed that 
a number not less than the quota of troops of every State from New 



195 

Hampshire to New Jersey inclusive will answer any good purpose; 
(the Quotas here referred to, are those which Congress apportioned to 
the several States for the continental establishment, the exact num- 
ber of which I have formerly sent by Pa n) and that they must be 

completed by the ist day of July, independent of the militia, 1500 of 
which is demanded of Connecticut, and to be held in readiness to join 
the main army within a week after they are called for. 

That every assistance must be afforded the Q' Mast. Gen'l in order 
to enable him to forward stores, etc. — That a quantity of Powder 
must be immediately furnished. — That the raising of Volunteers 
must be encouraged. — That if the Continental line cannot be filled up 
by the ist July with three years men, peremptory detachments from 
the militia must be made to serve till December next. Finally, 
should he not be properly supported, the consequences must prove 
fatal, as in that case the Enemy will overrun the Northern States — 
and by that means draw resources from thence to garrison New 
York, which will enable them to baffle all our future attempts; there- 
fore he insists upon an explicit answer, and wishes to know what he 
may depend on. Should his requisitions be not complied with, he 
must act on the defensive only. He complains loudly of their want 
of energy, of their tardiness in filling up their respective quotas of 
troops, and of their backwardness in paying the army; they (mean- 
ing the States) being eighteen months in arrears with them. The 
foregoing matters were taken up by the Assembly and several days 
spent in debate, and never was an Assembly in Connecticut since the 
commencement of the Rebellion so embarrassed as the present, 
owing to their loss of public credit, the want of means to carry on 
the war, and the depreciation of the paper currency, this last being 
the source whence proceeded every public evil. Nevertheless, it was 
violently urged by a powerful party to emit a new bank of paper 
currency and to make it a tender, without which they thought it 
impossible to carry on the war: All their prospects of loaning specie 
having failed. However, this was overruled by a majority, and they 
finally passed a Vote to tax in specie, and in specific articles of prod- 
uce, so that paper money is totally done with. I have at home an 
estimate of the expenses of the current year, which is about 19,000,- 
000 dollars in specie. This I dare not bring with me, but shall for- 
ward at a more safe opportunity. The French troops are now on 
their march and will reach Crumpond (where they are to encamp) in 
about ten days. G — 1 P — s assisted me in coming here now. We 
concerted measures for our future conduct with regard to conveying 
such intelligence as may come to his knowledge. I find him disposed 
to go some lengths (as the phrase is) to serve you, and even going 
thus far is gaining a great deal. But I, who am ever jealous of in- 
triguing persons, especially in this cause, fearing the measures 



196 

calculated to promote the interest of Government may be frustrated 
or thwarted by them, and myself made an instrument of fraud in a 
cause, for the support of which I have hazarded everything, have 
therefore exerted all the perspicacity I am master of, to annalize {so 
in the MS.) the Gentleman in Question and find he will not at present 
explicitly say that he will go such lengths as I could wish. I know 
the scruples he has to struggle with, those of education, family con- 
nections and military ideas of honor. But interest, together with the 
prejudices now subsisting between the army and State, rather than 
principle, may overcome these. Thus have I dealt with you with 
faithfulness and sincerity (as I think it my duty) and leave the 
improvement of the foregoing hints to your own superior judgment. 

Meantime I remain. Sir, 

Yr most Ob't & Very H'^i Serv't, 
Major De Lancey, 

* Questions by Major DeLancey to Hiram and his answers given 
20th June, 1781. 

QUESTIONS. 

ist. Is it your opinion that Gen'l P s will enter so heartily as to 

make us hope he will take an open, determined step in our favor ? 
Should that be the case you can hold up the situation of General 
Arnold and say it is in his power to place himself in one equally con- 
spicuous; and as he must lose his present property for a time, the 
f C. in C. will, for every man he puts in our possession pay three 
guineas; or should he choose it, he will specify the sum that shall be 
paid on such an event as we shall wish taking place. In the mean- 
time should he exert himself to give us intelligence, he need only 
name the recompense, and most punctual attention shall be paid to 
it. The greatest secrecy will be observed on our parts; anything 
that in the end is to be made public will depend upon himself and 
as the method of communicating will be under your manage- 
ment, little danger can be apprehended. It being necessary to estab- 
lish a more frequent intercourse, I think your proposal for Bulkley 
to take any papers to Cable's and to be taken from his house by 
Knapp will be the best as attended with less danger. Should any- 
thing of great moment arise, we should hope you will take such 
method (which is left to your own prudence) to communicate it to us 
without loss of time, and tho' I would not have you risk yourself, 
yet where the end is great, your zeal will induce you to be a little less 
cautious than usual, I need not repeat that gratitude will prompt us 



* Magazine 0/ American History, vol, xi, p, 346, 
+ Commander in Chief, 



197 

to keep pace in our recompense to you, with the rewards given to 
our friend. 

I give you the general heads of what we could wish our friend 
should inform us of, 

ist. The State of the American Army. 

2d. The State of the French Army. 

3d. How each Army is situated. 

4th. What enterprize they mean to undertake, and the method of 
counteracting them. 

5th. What supplies and from whence they expect to subsist. 

6th. Where the magazines are, and how to be destroyed. 

7th. The movement of the French fleet and their intentions. 

8th. News from the Southward of consequence. 

9th. The situation of the different forts. 

loth. News from Europe. 

nth. The hopes of the ensuing campaign. 

12th. As much of the correspondence between General Washing- 
ton and the Congress as possible. 

The above are general heads. His own knowledge will point out 
any further information that may be of use, and I hope his zeal will 
make these communications frequent. 

As the endeavor of our friend may principally tend to promote a 
speedy reconciliation, at the end of the war he has ever to be 
assured that the gratitude of the Nation, which he has contributed 
to restore peace and happiness, will place him in the most honorable 
and lucrative situations. 

As it is necessary I should report to the C. in C. he will think 
the business in no great forwardness unless I could give him some 
marks of the sincerity of our friend's intentions. To you I leave the 
method of procuring it. 

With respect to the scheme of traffick, if you will point out the 
best method, every assistance shall be given. 

I must now request you will give me the fullest information on the 
margin of this letter, which will add to the many obligations you have 
conferred on &c. &c. 

O. DeL. 

ANSWERS. 

I St. It is my opinion that he does not wish to take an open and 
avowed part at present, however determined he may appear to be 
(and is really so) to communicate any material intelligence in his 
power, to inculcate principles of reconciliation, and detaching his sub- 
ordinate officers from French connection, I have no authority to say 
that he will give up any post or men committed to his care. This in 



198 

my opinion must depend upon future contingencies and the adverse 
turn their affairs are like to take; for were he sure that Independence 
would take place, his prospects as a General officer would be so great 
from the country, that they would outweigh every other considera- 
tion. 

I have frequently held up Arnold to his view, who (I observed) ac- 
quired the esteem, the countenance and protection of the Commander 
in Chief, the applause of his brother officers, and would in the end of 
the Nation in general, together with honour and emoluments, instead 
of Contempt. 

I have on a former occasion described the man to you, his local 
attachments, his scruples, his prejudices, and talents at intrigue; and, 
as he has already embarked half way, your own acquaintance with 
the human heart will enable you to judge whether it is not probable, 
that in time, he will go through the several gradations you would 
wish and expect of him. To effect this something generous ought to 
be given him in hand, but (in my opinion) not so much as I know he 
would ask. His expectations may be raised. It is for you to judge how 
much you would be willing to give at present, as an adequate reward 
for what I have given you reason to expect; and I find myself dis- 
posed to fall short, rather than raise your expectations, as I think it 
the more pardonable error of the two. Whatever you are willing to 
give, shall be my business to safe convey. The mode of conveyance 

thro' Bulkley, Cable and K p shall be punctually attended to, if 

you think it the most eligible; but since we conversed on the subject 
I have thought of a less expensive and equally safe (if not more so) 
method. It is this. The Refugees ought to be directed to make 
descents from Lloyd's Neck at certain periods, viz.: the ist and 15th 
of each month, on the shore adjacent to Bulkley's house, for the os- 
tensible purpose of destroying whale boats, driving off cattle &c. , as 
they could land in force, the small Rebel guards would be drove 
back into the country sufficiently remote from Bulkley's house, so as to 
give some prudent officer (whose business it ought to be made) an op- 
portunity of receiving from Bulkley the papers left with him. As the 
Refugees would conceive these little excursions to be in the line of 
their duty, no additional expense to the government would accrue. 
Perhaps I am mistaken. Should any event occur in the intermediate 
spaces of time which would require immediate notice to be given 
here, I would ride down to Knapp's and charge him with the delivery 
of it. Which of these modes of conveyance appears to you to be the 
most preferable, shall be attended to. The several heads from the ist 
to the 12th inclusive shall be attended to; but as I may not retain 
them, and it not being safe to carry such minutes out with me now, 
it will be best to send them out to Bulkley and order him to leave 
them at the usual place. They ought to be in cypher. I shall look 



199 

for them about the 28th inst., and shall collect such intelligence (to 
convey back by the same hand) as I find are deserving notice. 

The necessity of our friend's giving me frequent and particular in- 
formation of every occurrence, in order to transmit them here shall 
be urged. 

Nothing shall be wanting on my part that may tend to beget in 
him a firm and perfect reliance on those offers you are pleased to 
authorize me to make. The ascendancy I have over him, the influ- 
ence I have over him, the confidence he has already reposed in me, 
the alluring prospect of Pecuniary, as well as honorary rewards, 
together with the plaudits of a grateful nation, shall all be combined 
together and placed in a conspicuous point of view, to engage him 
heartily in the cause. I know of no better method to try his sincerity 
than for him to select out of the foregoing heads, from the ist to the 
12th, inclusive, such as he can immediately give proper and pre- 
cise answers to, and intrust me with the care of communicating 
them. In this service it would not be amiss for me to be able to tell 
what he may expect at present. I urge this to prevent his making an 
unreasonable and extravagant demand. 

As to the scheme of traffick, if I find it can be carried on without 
great danger, I shall point out to Mr. McNeill the method of carry- 
ing it into execution without any expense to the government. The 
danger attending it one side is greater now than when I first pre- 
pared it. To promote the real interest of my King and country, and 
to approve myself deserving the approbation of the C. in C. and you, 
shall be the constant objects of my attention. 

I am, &c., &c., 

W, H. 

15 July, 1781. 

* Sir — It is not my fault that you have not heard from me before 
now. I left two packets at the place appointed for Bulkley to take 
them; one of the 28th Ult", the other of the 4th Inst. When I came 
to the place a second time I was surprised to find the first packet 
there; but more so now when I found both there unmoved. 

Soon after my return from New York, I had an interview with our 
friend, and after acquainting him of the nature of those services 
expected from him (at least as far as I could recollect the heads of 
the Queries you last showed me), we concerted measures for his con- 
veying to me every material article of intelligence. The enclosed is 
the first essay of the Kind, which serves to show the manner and the 
stile in which he is to write— as to a confidential friend, anxious to 
know those matters and occurrences, which in anywise affect the 
cause of the country. 



Magazine of American History, vol. xii, p. 163. 



200 

One thing he said in the course of our conversation which convinces 
me that I am not deceived by him; that is, when he talked about his 
son,* he said, were he brought into New York, he wished that some 
provision may be made for him in the British Navy, to serve in 
Europe during the present contest. This is a fact which will enable 
you to judge of him for yourself. I expected to have been able to 
furnish him e'er this time with that paper you showed me last, con- 
taining the several heads of those matters to which you wished to 
have clear and explicit answer. He readily agreed to pay the strict- 
est attention to them. He will expect some money by me this time, 
but how to get it here I know not, as I would not wish to have any 
person besides yourself, or those you can confide in, made acquainted 
with anything of that nature. The bearer will acquaint you where 
I am concealed, but it is not a proper place for me to see anybody; 
not that I have anything to fear from the family, but from the 
Neighbors. 

I came here under the sanction of a commission from Gov. Trum- 
bull to cruise in the Sound. I am sorry I ever attempted to meddle 
with this plan of a commercial nature; this is the first essay, and I 
believe it will be the last. I entered upon it purely to draw in our 
friend; but I am sensible it is attended with more trouble and vexa- 
tion to you, as well as danger to me, than it can be of real advantage 
to me, otherwise than that I know it is serving the cause of govern- 
ment essentially. So thoroughly are our leaders on the other side 
convinced of the truth of this assertion that the severest laws are 
passed against it. I was at Mr. K p^ seasonable enough to ac- 
quaint you of the movement of troops to Kingsbridge, and of the 
French troops changing or shifting their first intended route for that 
purpose; but Mr. K p was not returned home then. 

The number of French troops is between 4 and 5000, and the late 
daily issues to the Continental army was about 7300 Rations. In this 
calculation the Staff, Artificers, Waggoners, &c. , are included. This 
I had yesterday from a person in the issuing Commissary's Depart- 
ment. The Jersey and the New York line, which will amount to 
about 2300 men, are (I judge) by this time joined. West Point is to 
garrisoned by the militia. 

Should any money be sent to oViV friend, it will be best to put it up 

in something like a belt. t „^ o „ 

^ I am, &c., ^ ^ 

P. S. — I thought it advisable to cut the name off the enclosed. 
Our friend manifested a wish that a cask of wine may be sent, 
however, I gave him not the least encouragement. 



* His son Enoch, who was born November 5, 1769, and was at this time 11 years and 8 
months old. 



20I 

[Copy of a letter from G P, to W. H.] 

Camp, Phillipsburg, 

8th July, 1781. 

Dr. Sir — We have now taken a camp within about 12 miles of 
Kingsbridge, where I expect we shall continue until we know whether 
the states will in any considerable degree comply with the requisi- 
tions made of them, altho' we believe ourselves able to maintain our 
ground. You may easily conjecture what our future prospects are, 
when I assure you the five Regiments of our state are more than 1200 
men deficient of their complement; and the other States (except 
Rhode Island and New York, who are fuller) nearly in the same con- 
dition. 

The right of the front line is commanded by me, consisting of Con- 
necticut and Rhode Island troops; the left by General Lincoln, con- 
sisting of the brigades of Massachusetts. The 2d line, one brigade 
of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, commanded by General 
Howe. General McDougall commands at West Point. 

When the York forces join he will be relieved, which I expect will 
be soon, when I suppose he will take the right of the first line, and I 
shall be in the center; but this is uncertain. 

Our magazines are few in number, as well as very small; your fears 
for them are groundless. They are principally at West Point, Fish- 
kill, Wapping's Creek and Newburgh, which puts them out of the 
enemy's power, except they attempt their destruction by a force suffi- 
cient to secure the Highlands (which at present they cannot do), our 
guards at the magazines being sufficient to secure them from small 
parties. As the object of the Campaign is the reduction of New York, 
we shall now effectually try the patriotism of our countrymen, who 
have always given us assurances of assistance when this should be- 
come the object. Of this I have had my doubts for several years, 
and wished it put to the test. 

The Minister of France is in Camp, and the French troops yester- 
day encamped on our left, near the Tuckeyhoe road. Their number 
I have not had opportunity to ascertain. 

The other matters of information you wish I shall be able to give 
you in a few days. The messenger waits. 

I am, 
D' Sir, 

Y-- Obedt Serv't, 

[The signature cut out.] 

The editor of the Record of Private Intelligence, Mr. De Lancey, 
and — following him — Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, 
find corroboration of the Record in sundry letters addressed to Major 



202 

John Kissam, in which Heron is mentioned, published by Henry G. 
Onderdonk, under the heading "Flags of Truce," in the Roslyn 
News, a Long Island newspaper. 

They are all dated in April, 1781, and they do confirm the Record 
in that they show that Heron was within the British lines at, or near, 
New York from the 21st to the 27th of April, 1781, but they do not 
confirm Heron's statements concerning General Parsons, who is 
mentioned, or referred to, in one of the Kissam letters only. This 
letter is as follows: 

Westbury, April 23, 1781. 

* Sir — I enclose a passport for Mr. Heron, and should wish for his 
return to Stamford whenever the wind will permit it. I have not yet 
received answer from New York, but as soon as those things wanted 
by General Parsons shall arrive, I will forward them to the General 
by another flag. 

I have the honor to be, with great regard, sir, 

Your most ob't, humble servant, 

L. J. A. De WURMB, 
L. Col. 

The postscript of a letter written by William Heron, dated New 
York, March 14, 1782, which is not included in Sir Henry Clinton's 
Record of Private Intelligence is evidence of importance. 

I have kept General P — s in a tolerable frame of mind since I had 
the pleasure of seeing you last, & altho' he was somewhat Chagrin'd 
when I returned from this place last October, yet I am convinc'd that 
in endeavoring to serve you he has (since) rendered himself in some 
measure unpopular. As you very well remember, I acquainted you 
with this Man's prevailing disposition and temper, and observ'd that 
altho' I believed him a rank Republican in principle, yet he was 
capable of serving you from other motives. The same Motives are 
still existing — and in Addition to them, disgust, Chagrin & disaffec- 
tion towards his Superiors come in as powerful Auxilliaries — his 
frustrating the expedition concerted by Tallmadge against Lloyd's 
Neck, his being an advocate for Loyal Subjects, and his being 
ready to Communicate whatever comes to his Knowledge of the 
Secrets of the Cabinet, are facts which are indisputable. Whether 
such services merit any reward, or whether a Man of principles can 
be Useful to you, is not for me to say. However, he has been 
encouraged to expect something, and, I suppose, can't be kept much 
longer in Countenance. For my own part, I consider myself bound 



Magazine of American History, vol. xii, p. i68. 



203 

to persevere in discharging as far as my situation will admit of, those 
duties which I owe my sovreign & my Country.* 



This is the whole case against General Parsons. There is no 
question as to the genuineness of the Record of Private Intelligence, 
and the hundred years between its compilation and its discovery give 
the weight of age to its contents. It must be admitted that a first 
reading seems to leave no doubt that Parsons was disloyal to the 
government and people whose commission he held. The letter pur- 
porting to come from him was clearly enough an answer in part to 
the inquiries proposed by Major De Lancey. If General Parsons 
wrote it with a view of giving useful information to the enemy, by 
that act he became a dishonored man. 

But is Connecticut driven to break the image of another conspicu- 
ous officer of the army of the revolution ? Must Parsons be put in 
the same category with the brilliant soldier, who had he been mor- 
tally wounded by the bullet which laid him low at Quebec, or the 
shot that struck him at Saratoga would have been honored as a 
national hero, but whose odious name is to-day a synonym for 
treachery ? 

In answering this inquiry, I call your attention to the fact that the 
whole of the evidence against General Parsons rests upon letters 
or statements supplied by " Hiram" or "W. H." which stand for 
William Heron of Reading, Connecticut. 

For the letter of Lieutenant-colonel DeWurmb, to which the editor 
of the Record and Appleton's Cyclopedia give importance, is an 
absolutely colorless paper, openly sent by one subordinate officer of 
the British army to another, and which especially provides that ' * the 
things wanted by General Parsons," books, papers, clothing, they 
may have been, for prisoners within the American lines, are not 
to be forwarded through Heron, but by "another flag." The his- 
torian or biographer who could accept this letter as evidence of trea- 
son has betrayed a bias of mind which deprives his conclusions of 
value. Moreover, on the 23d of April, 1781, the date of this letter, 
Heron's first letter relating his interview with General Parsons, had 
not been written. 

It is important to know what manner of man Heron was. f He 
was a native of Cork, Ireland, born in 1742, who had been a 



''^Magazine of American History^ vol. xx, p. 351. 

+ It has been said of him generally that he was graduated at Trinity college, Dublin, 
but his name does not appear in the list of graduates. He married March 8, 1767, Mary 
Jennings. He died in 1819, 



204 

schoolmaster and a surveyor. At Reading he was generally known 
as Esquire Heron, and he represented the town in the General 
Assembly in 1778, '79. '80, 81, '84, '85, '86, '87, '88, '89, '90, '95, '96, 
thirteen years. In 1777, the town of Reading chose him to act 
on a committee "to hire a number of Soldiers to serve in the 
Continental army." In 1779, the General Assembly appointed him 
one of a committee to inquire into, and estimate the losses of indi- 
viduals at Norwalk in consequence of the British invasion. In 1780, 
the same body appointed him a member of a committee to inquire 
into the conduct of persons employed in the department of the Quar- 
termaster General and the Commissary General with power of re- 
moval. 

Todd's History of Reading says, " In the revolution he sided with 
the King and was the recognized leader of the tories of Reading 
Ridge " [and that] " At the time of Tryon's invasion he openly gave 
aid and comfort to the enemy." But this is incredible. In 1776, the 
General Assembly prescribed an oath to be taken by its members 
and others, which included a declaration that "You believe in your 
conscience that the King of Great Britain hath not, nor of right ought 
to have, any authority or dominion in, or over, this State," and, 
" that you will, to the utmost of your power, maintain and defend the 
freedom, independence, and privileges of this State against all open 
enemies, or traitorous conspiracies whatsoever." An open tory could 
not have taken such an oath, nor could he have been appointed to 
the committees on which Heron served. The statement of Mr. Todd 
is evidently built upon a knowledge that Heron was engaged in a 
treasonable correspondence with the enemy, and an amplification of 
a story told him by "an aged person," that at the time of the inva- 
sion, Tryon and some of his of&cers, " were invited into Esquire 
Heron's, who lived in the first house south of the church, and enter- 
tained with cake and wine." If the story told by the aged person is 
true it is without significance. The wily Heron was looking out for 
the safety of his property. In 1781, Lund Washington, in charge of 
Mount Vernon, saved the property from ravage by furnishing the 
vessel which carried the marauding party with provisions. More- 
over, General James Robertson of the British army, at that time 
royal governor of the province of New York, communicated Septem- 
ber 21, 1780, to William Knox, one of his majesty's secretaries, a 
statement of the condition of affairs in America, made by Heron at 
New York, September 4, 1780. He says, referring to Heron, " He 
has had every opportunity he could desire to be acquainted with 
public affairs and especially of that colony. Till April last he was in 
the assembly, and a member for the County Correspondence, is now 
in office respecting the public accounts. He was an enemy to the 
Declaration of Independence, but he said little except to trusty 



20S 

Loyalists. He stands well with the officers of the Continental army 
— with General Parsons he is intimate and is not suspected" 

Eliminate the extract from Todd's History of Reading and the re- 
mainder of the matter relating to Heron presents no difficulties. It is 
clear that he was a highly respected citizen, believed by his neigh- 
bors to be attached to the cause of the colonies. 

A letter of April 6, 1782, from Parsons to Washington makes a re- 
markable disclosure concerning him. The letter is as follows: 

* Dear General— When I was last with you, I forgot to mention 
the name of Mr. William Heron of Redding, who has for several years 
had opportunities of informing himself of the state of the enemy, 
their designs and intentions, with more certainty and precision than 
most men who have been employed. As I have left the service, I think 
it my duty to inform Your Excellency of this person and my reasons 
for believing him more capable of rendering service that way than 
most people are that may be employed if necessary. He is a native 
of Ireland, a man of very large knowledge, and a great share of nat- 
ural sagacity, united with a sound judgment, but of as unmeaning a 
countenance as any person in my acquaintance. With this appearance 
he is as little suspected as any man can be. An officer in the depart- 
ment of the adjutant general is a countryman and very intimate ac- 
quaintance of Mr. Heron, through which channel he has been able 
frequently to obtain important and very interesting intelligence. That 
he has had access to some of their secrets, a few facts will show be- 
yond doubt. Your Excellency will remember I informed you of the 
contents of a letter you wrote to Virginia, which was intercepted a 
year ago, but not published. This letter of his friend shows him of 
the descent made last year on New London. I was informed by him 
and made a written representation of it to the governor and council 
three days before it took place. This he had through the same chan- 
nel. He has frequently brought me the most accurate descriptions of 
the posts occupied by the enemy, and more rational accounts of their 
numbers, strength and designs than I have been able to obtain in 
any other way. 

As to his character, I know him to be a consistent, national Whig, 
he is always in the field on every alarm, and has in every trial proved 
himself a man of bravery. He has a family and a considerable inter- 
est in the state, and from the beginning of the war has invariably 
followed the measures of the country. I might add, as a circum- 
stance of his fidelity, his delivery of a letter from General Arnold to 
Major Andre to me, instead of leaving it where it was directed, 



* Magazine of American History. Vindication of Gen. S. H. Parsons, by George B. 
Loring, vol. xx, p. 293. 

15 



2o6 

which letter you have. In opposition to this, his enemies suggest 
that he carries on illicit trade with the enemy, but I have lived two 
years the next door to him, and am fully convinced he has never had 
a single article of any kind for sale during that time, nor do I be- 
lieve he was, in the most distant manner, connected with com- 
merce at that time, or any subsequent period. I know many persons 
of more exalted character are also accused, none more than Governor 
Trumbull, nor with less reason. I believe the governor and Mr, 
Heron as clear of this business as I am, and I know myself to be totally 
free from everything which has the least connection with that com- 
merce. I think it my duty to give this full information of his char- 
acter, that if you should think it expedient to employ him, you might 
have some knowledge of the man, that you might be better able to 
satisfy yourself if you should send for him. I believe on conversa- 
tion he would give you entire satisfaction. I am, dear General, 
With the highest esteem. 

Your Excellency's ob't servant, 

SAMUEL H. PARSONS. 

In these facts derived from the public records, and in these letters, 
largely his own, we have the character of the man upon whose repre- 
sentations the whole case hinges. A tory in New York, a whig in 
Connecticut, on each side of the line he carried conviction of his sin- 
cerity. We find him capable of leaving a general assembly in which 
he had taken a solemn oath of fidelity to the state to betray its secret 
deliberations to a British officer : in his character as a tory at New 
York obtaining information from those he professed to serve to sell 
it to General Parsons, and to crown all, if his own representations 
are to be trusted, capable of entering upon a conspiracy to blast for- 
ever the fame of his intimate friend. He distributed his rascally 
favors apparently with an even hand, as indifferent to results as lago, 

" Now whether he kill Cassio 
Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other, 
Every way makes my game." 

The spy who, inspired by patriotic feeling, obedient to duty, incurs 
the danger of ignominious death, men delight to honor; one, who. 
moved by pecuniary considerations alone, undertakes such service 
and faithfully carries out his contract may be entitled to respect. 
But this man purveyed news for both sides, deceived both sides, was 
paid by both sides. Major De Lancey, the British officer, wrote, " I 
need not repeat that gratitude will prompt us to keep pace in our 
recompense to you, with the rewards given to our friend." General 
Parsons' letter clearly implies that he also had paid him. As he 



207 

pocketed his pay, no doubt he often chuckled, while his unmeaning 
countenance betraj'ed no sign, like lago again, 

" Thus do I ever make my fool my purse." 

What is the unsupported evidence of this witness worth ? It has 
substantially the value of the east wind as an article of diet. No 
man's reputation should be even smirched by the testimony of this 
liar and false swearer. 

The legal principle is substantially as follows : I quote from Rice 
on Evidence (vol. 3, p. 292.) The credibility of a witness may be 
" utterly annihilated" by disclosures " whereby the moral rottenness 
of the witness is exposed, the entire absence of moral sense of ac- 
countability, the strong presence of a dominating sense of personal 
gain or advantage." 

I might stop here, except that something should be said concern- 
ing the letter, purporting to come from General Parsons, transmitted 
to British headquarters. Now, the original not being in evidence, the 
only proof that it was written by Parsons is the statement of the dis- 
credited witness. Heron. The signature was cut off. Why should the 
signature, if genuine, of a letter, which on its face was innocent, have 
been removed ? The signature disclosed nothing, for the identity of 
the writer was revealed by the body of the letter. The reason is not 
hard to find. The signature of General Parsons must have been 
well known at British headquarters, and the removal of the name 
stamps the letter as a fraud concocted by Heron, who cut off the sig- 
nature to lessen the likelihood of its detection. This theory seems 
to me in full accord with all the facts, but there is another, not with- 
out support, which is also consistent with the integrity of Parsons. 

In the spring of 1781, Cornwallis was in Virginia at the head of 
7000 effective men, and with scarcely one-third of that number to 
oppose him. Lacking command of the sea, the fleet of De Grasse 
being then in the West Indies, Washington and Rochambeau agreed 
that the measure most likely to afford relief to the southern states 
would be a serious demonstration against New York. Washington 
wrote Jefferson June 8, 1781, "The prospect of giving relief to the 
southern states by an operation in this quarter (New York) was the 
principal inducement for undertaking it." Washington desired 
Clinton to apprehend an attack on New York, for relief of the south- 
ern states by this method could be made effective only by leading 
Clinton to strengthen his own position by withdrawing troops from 
the south. The plan worked well. You will remember that in June 
Clinton ordered Cornwallis to send back to New York, three thousand 
men. Bancroft says, "Deceived by letters that were written to be 
intercepted, he [Clinton] believed that the enemy would certainly 
attack that post " [New York]. Now, the only information in the 



2o8 

Parsons letter which Clinton might not have obtained easily from 
other sources is to be found in the incidental remark, '♦ As the object 
of the campaign is the reduction of New York." An American 
officer, high in command, might be supposed to know the real 
purposes of Washington. It is possible that Parsons may have 
written the letter on lines suggested by his spy Heron, expressly to 
fall into the hands of Clinton with the laudable wish to further 
Washington's plan of campaign. 

In the absence of a witness more trustworthy than Heron, what 
actually took place in the matter which has occupied our attention 
this evening must remain unknown. But the true story, per- 
haps, is not far from this : In September, 1779, Lord George Ger- 
main wrote Sir Henry Clinton, "Next to the destruction of Wash- 
ington's army, the gaining over of officers of influence and reputation 
among the troops would be the speediest means of subduing the 
rebellion and restoring the tranquillity of America. Your commis- 
sion authorizes you- to avail yourself of such opportunities, and the 
expense will be cheerfully submitted to."* Now Heron had in- 
formed the British headquarters that he was intimate with Parsons. 
Here, then, was a rare opportunity for Clinton to carry out the 
instructions of the home office. A royalist at heart, already in his 
pay, who was also the intimate friend of a rebel general of character 
and influence, was at hand for his purposes. The subject was 
broached to the crafty Heron, who jumped at the scheme. Although 
his plan to make it profitable may have been confused at first, it was 
soon worked out, and after this fashion : First, make Clinton believe 
that Parsons is purchasable; second, convince him that Parsons has 
yielded to temptation; third, become the intermediary through whom 
the compensation is made. It involved little risk. Parsons need 
know nothing about it, and with a fraction of a fair price for a likely 
major general safely laid away in the Heron family treasury, he could 
afford to retire from the practice of his profession as a spy. From his 
retreat at Reading Ridge, when the fraud should be discovered, he 
could safely ask Sir Henry Clinton, " What are you going to do about 
it? " Sir Henry's mouth would have been closed. You have observed 
how frequently he brought the matter of compensation to the atten- 
tion of Major De Lancey. June 20, " Something generous should be 
given him in hand." .... " Whatever you are willing to give, 
shall be my business to safe convey." Again in the same paper, " It 
would not be amiss for me to be able to tell what he may expect at 
present." July 15, " He will expect some money by me this time." 
Again in the same letter, " Should any money be sent to our friend, 
it will be be best to put it up in something like a belt." It is rather 



*Bancro/i''s History of the United States, vol. Sip- 428. 



209 

gratifying to find that Heron's game was not successful. Eight 
months later, in March, 1782, he wrote : " He has been encouraged to 
expect something, and I suppose can't be kept much longer in coun- 
tenance." At this time nearly eleven months had elapsed since 
Heron reported favorable progress with Parsons, but he had been 
able to get nothing on Parsons' account. And why ? Clinton was in 
the market for rebel generals, and was authorized to pay for them. 
If the proofs that Parsons had yielded to temptation had been forth- 
coming, the money would have been forthcoming also, without doubt. 
If Parsons had been guilty, there could have been no trouble about 
the proofs. Precisely that happened which should have happened if 
he were free from taint. 

The brazen mendacity of Heron and the strait in which he found 
himself when he wanted proofs that Parsons had rendered service to 
the British are well illustrated in the letter of March 14, 1782, in 
which he mentions " his [Parsons] frustrating the expedition con- 
certed by Tallmadge against Lloyd's Neck." Now the only expedi- 
tion projected by Tallmadge against Lloyd's Neck, between the time 
when Heron, according to his own statement, made the first corrupt 
proposition to Parsons, and the date of this letter, was projected in 
April, 1 781. Tallmadge, in his memoir says that he "informed 
Washington that by the aid of a small naval force, say two frigates, the 
Sound could be cleared, and with his permission, I would take my 
own detachment and such additional force as he should judge neces- 
sary and break up their establishment at Lloyd's Neck of about 800 
men, and Fort Slongo of about 150 men," General Washington fur- 
nished him with a letter to Rochambeau, by whom he was well 
received, but, these are his words, " The absence of the smaller 
ships of the \^FrencK\ squadron on special service prevented the 
execution of the plan.''^ Lacking entirely proof that Parsons had 
rendered military service to the British, Heron followed his custom- 
tomary method and invented some. 

Samuel Holden Parsons was a man of character by inheritance, a 
believer in independence three years before the declaration, a pro- 
jector of the continental congress, a soldier in the field from the first 
clash of arms until after the surrender at Yorktown, and was called by 
his countrymen during twenty-one of the fifty-two years which he 
lived to important military and civil stations. The waters of the Big 
Beaver closing over him made vacant a seat upon the bench. 

William Heron was a professional spy, he swore falsely in the gen- 
eral assembly, betrayed his employers on both sides, and by his own 
statement was engaged in a scheme either to rob a British officer of 
his gold or his intimate friend of his honor. Parsons knew him as 



^Memoirs of Col. Benj. Tallmadge^ by himself. 



210 

whig, Clinton knew him as a tory, we know him as a liar. The 
unsupported testimony of such a witness against any man, where 
deflection from the truth could be of advantage, should not have a 
pin's weight. 

On the evidence of this man, when it is considered that the only 
one of his statements reflecting upon Parsons which can be tested — 
that relating to the expedition against Lloyd's Neck — is shown to be 
untrue; that lying in this case offered promise of gain; that the 
plausible rascal was never able to make Clinton believe that his cor- 
rupt proposals had been accepted by Parsons; to brand this gallant 
officer and respected magistrate a British spy, is an act of monstrous 
injustice. * 







A VINDICATION OF GENERAL ISRAEL 
PUTNAM. 

[Contributed to the Hartford Post by Jonathan Trumbull.] 

A striking instance of the base uses to which even a minor heathen 
deity may be turned in our day and generation is to be found in the 
spectacle of Capt. T. J. Mackey insisting that "the muse of history 
must weep " over the statue of Gen. Israel Putnam " in front of the 
state house at Hartford," which statue Captain Mackey characterizes 
as " a monumental lie in bronze." His confidence in the suscepti- 
bility of the muse of history to the hypnotic influence of historical 
misstatements appears to be his only reason for expecting her to 
weep at his command; for through the medium of the Peterson 
Magazine, in a serial life of Washington, commencing with the June 
number and ending with the December number in 1895, he charges 
Putnam with "flagrant derelictions of duty," with cowardice and 
active participation in the Conway cabal, remarking that, on various 
occasions, his conduct " bore the ear-marks of studied treachery; " all 
of which will, he says, be " shown "or " attested by clearest proofs." 

This promised demonstration of these serious charges is, however, 
conspicuous by its absence; for Putnam's accuser omits to cite a 
single authority for his statements and appears to rely on a certain 
childlike faith on the part of his readers, which will be satisfied with 
the assurance that if you see it in the Peterson Magazine it's so. 

But, seriously, does not a writer assume a graver responsibility 
in attacking the reputation of a man who has always been regarded 
as one of the heroes of the American Revolution, than in attacking 
the reputation of a man who is living and can defend himself ? 
Were it not for the fact that these unproved and unfounded 
charges will be and have been read by hundreds who may take them 
as authoritative, we might let them pass in the full belief that they 
will live a short and noxious life which the chemistry of nature will 
soon annihilate. But, as a certain amount of mischief may be done 
by them, it is best to investigate and, so far as our sources of infor- 
mation will allow, to confront them with recorded facts. 

The first charge against Putnam is in connection with his command 
at Cambridge in November, 1775, and refers to the demand of two 



212 

Connecticut regiments for their discharge, on the ground that their 
term of enlistment had expired. Regarding this circumstance the 
author says : 

Despite every appeal to their patriotism they refused to re-enlist and left for their 
homes in a body three days before their term of enlistment expired, carrying off their mus- 
kets and ammunition, which were public property. They belonged to the command of 
General Israel Putnam, an officer who, it will be shown, in after years brought bitter dis- 
aster to the American army by his flagrant derelictions of duty, and he failed to report the 
facts in time for Washington to intercept the deserters. 

Will Captain Mackey please to "show" or attest "by clearest 
proofs," as he promises to do : 

That two Connecticut regiments, or about 1,500 men, " left for their 
homes in a body," at the time he refers to. 

That their arms and ammunition were " public property." 

That Putman failed to report the facts to Washington at the proper 
time. 

The evidence at our command points to an entirely different state 
of affairs. In the first place, let us look at Washington's own state- 
ment regarding this matter; a statement which appears, singularly 
enough, to be utterly ignored by his enthusiastic biographer. In 
writing to Governor Trumbull regarding the Connecticut men who 
left the army at this time, Washington says, over his own signature : 

Many of them went off, and though the utmost vigilance and industry were used to 
apprehend them, several got away with their arms and ammunition. 

It thus seems that the two regiments which, according to Captain 
Mackey's statement, " left for their homes in a body," were, accord- 
ing to the contemporary statement of Washington, " several " men, 
who, under Captain Mackey's manipulation appear to have increased 
and multiplied even in larger arithmetical proportion than the men 
in buckram of whom the redoubtable Jack Fal staff discourses. 

In order still further to magnify the enormity of Putnam's alleged 
negligence and its consequences, it appears necessary to his accuser 
to make the statement that these two mythical regiments carried 
with them their arms and ammunition which were "public property," 
or in other words, that those men stole from the American army about 
1,500 muskets and corresponding ammunition, at a time when they 
were sorely needed; for all of which Putnam is held responsible. The 
act of the general assembly of Connecticut under which these men 
enlisted contemplated that they should furnish their own arms, for 
the use of which they were to be paid, and that only in case of fail- 
ure to furnish their own arms should they be provided by the colony. 
{Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, vol. 14, p. 418. Subse- 
quent legislation in the May session of 1775 also provided for payment 
for ammunition furnished by enlisted men. This custom was continued 



213 

in recruiting by Washington himself, as appears by his general or- 
ders of January 20, 1776. In view of these facts, we may, with par- 
donable curiosity, inquire by what means it is discovered at this late 
day that the arms and ammunition in question were ' ' public prop- 
erty." 

When we confront the statement that Putnam failed to report the 
facts in time for Washington "to intercept the deserters," with 
Washington's own statement that "the utmost vigilance and in- 
dustry were used to apprehend them," we need hardly go further. 
But it is as well to cite the fact that, in the same communication, 
Washington says that it had already been discovered that these men 
" were uneasy to leave the service and determined upon it," and that 
a council of war had been called during the previous week to take ac- 
tion upon this very matter. And if Washington himself was half 
as much impressed with Putnam's alleged, negligence in this matter 
as his more modern accuser appears to be, it is simply inexplicable 
that he should have made the following mention of Putnam in a let- 
ter to the president of congress on the 30th of January, 1776, after 
having had two months in which to meditate on Putnam's conduct in 
this matter : 

"General Putnam is a most valuable man and a fine executive 
officer." 

So, in this first charge made against Putnam, there is left to the 
author the responsibility, not only of producing proofs, but of 
explaining away recorded facts. 

His confidence in Putnam's ability led Washington to appoint him 
to the command of the forces at Brooklyn Heights and the vicinity, 
in the emergency occasioned by the severe illness of General Greene, 
who had been occupied during the summer of 1776 in fortifying this 
important position, and who was of course as thoroughly familiar as 
Putnam was unfamiliar with the position. At the time when Putnam 
assumed this command the British force of 20,000 veteran troops, 
under command of the ablest generals of the British army, had 
already landed at Gravesend and had spent two days in reconnoiter- 
ing the position. To oppose their advance towards the fortifications 
on Brooklyn Heights, Putnam had at his disposal about 5,000 raw 
recruits, for whose movements in repelling an advance Washington 
issued specific official orders in writing on the 25th, and in person on 
the 26th of August, the day before the battle. The advance of the 
British was possible by four different roads over a space about three 
miles wide, and through a country offering, from its tory inhab- 
itants, every facility for effecting their purpose. 

For the inevitable defeat of this forlorn hope of repelling this 
advance by a force of undisciplined troops, one-fourth the number of 
their disciplined enemy, General Putnam is held solely responsible 



214 

by Captain Mackey, and by nobody else, so far as we can ascertain. 
Though Putnam needs no further defense against the attacks of his 
accuser in this instance than the circumstances just outlined afford, 
let us examine a little of the documentary evidence which naturally 
attaches to these charges, and which appears to be utterly disre- 
garded or wilfully misconstrued by Putnam's accuser. 

We find we must begin by calling on Captain Mackey for evidence 
to prove his statement that Putnam " claimed the right" to command 
at Long Island. That he had a perfect right to this claim we do not 
dispute; but we have searched in vain for any evidence that he 
asserted it. All this would be unimportant were it not for the fact 
that it is also stated that Putnam's "whole conduct at Long Island 
and subsequently in the Highlands, bore the ear-marks of studied 
treachery," the inference which the indulgent reader is expected to 
draw being, no doubt, that he claimed the command at Long Island 
in order to betray the American forces. In pursuance of this view 
of the case, we find it stated at the outset that upon assuming the 
command at Long Island, " he at once proceeded to organize defeat 
for the American army." The specifications of these charges are 
that General Sullivan, who had a perfect knowledge of the country, 
was posted within the lines and that General Stirling, who was 
unfamiliar with the country, was stationed beyond them; that the 
troops were withdrawn from the wooded heights commanding the 
passes towards Brooklyn and that Sullivan's mounted patrols were 
forbidden to go beyond the passes. 

The battle of Long Island was fought on the 27th of August, 1776, 
commencing at an early hour in the morning. Washington was on 
the ground on the 24th and the following day issued these orders to 
Putnam upon the subject of repelling an advance of the British: 

"The militia, or the most indifferent troops (those I mean least 
tutored and seen least service) will do for the interior work, whilst 
your best men should at all hazards prevent the enemy's passing the 
wood and approaching your works." 

These orders were followed by another visit from Washington on 
the 26th, when he " continued till evening," according to the official 
report of his secretary. Colonel Harrison, for no other purpose than 
to arrange for the battle, which, according to the same official report, 
he saw was impending. In further confirmation, we find on the same 
day that the Maryland and Delaware troops which composed part of 
Lord Stirling's brigade were ordered over from New York by Wash- 
ington's direction. In full view of these very plain orders of Wash- 
ington and of the precision with which they were executed by Put- 
nam, his accuser remarks that, " Putnam's plain duty [on the first 
alarm of the approach of the enemy] was to man his breastworks, to 
have every soldier at his post and await daylight," while he was 



215 

under written orders from Washington directing that his " best men 
should at all hazards prevent the enemy's passing the wood and ap- 
proaching " his works. 

A glance at any reliable map, and even a superficial reading of 
any reliable account of the battle, will show that it was upon the 
wooded heights commanding the passes to Brooklyn that the Ameri- 
can troops were posted, and that the advance of the British was con- 
tested; and yet we are told that the troops were withdrawn from 
these very heights. We are also informed that the patrols which had 
been employed by Sullivan were withdrawn by Putnam's orders, for 
which statement we must ask for authority which shall dispose of 
H. P. Johnson's statement in vol. 3 of the Memoirs of the Long Island 
Historical Society, which asserts that " on the night of the 26th Sul- 
livan exercised the same authority he had exercised in making other 
details and sent out a special patrol of five commissioned officers to 
watch the Jamaica pass." Documents are quoted in support of this 
statement. Fiske's statement that these patrols were captured on 
the morning of the 27th must also be disposed of. 

The fact appears to be that Sullivan, who, as Washington once 
plainly told him. was one of the most notorious malcontents among 
the respectable American generals of his day, sent to congress, more 
than a year later, his own version of his share in this battle, in which 
he mentions his own foresight regarding the Jamaica road and makes 
the singular confession that, instead of massing his entire force to 
repel the expected advance of the enemy by this road, he went for- 
ward with a " picket of 400," to reconnoitre and was surrounded by 
the enemy and obliged to surrender. It thus appears, by Sullivan's 
own showing, that he had been placed in command of a position 
regarding which he had professed the greatest knowledge and fore- 
sight and that the exercise of this foresight prevented him from 
making use of more than 400 men of his brigade, while Stirling, who, 
according to Captain Mackey's opinion, should have changed positions 
with Sullivan, made the best possible use of his entire brigade and 
did practically all the fighting that was done in the battle. 

The statistics at the command of Putnam's accuser are as surpris- 
ing and as well adapted to his purpose as his unsupported account 
of the military situation. In summing up the results, he says : 
'* The American loss at the battle of Long Island was not less than 
3,000 and thus each star upon the coat collar of Major General Putnam 
had cost the continental army 1,000 brave soldiers." 

By this sudden and convenient transformation of the figures of 
arithmetic into a figure of speech the dazzled reader is expected to 
draw the inference that 3,000 soldiers of the continental army were 
killed at the battle of Long Island and that Putnam was responsible 
for the "loss " of each and every one of them. Once more it must 



2l6 

be remarked that Washington's enthusiastic biographer has, appar- 
ently, no use for Washington's own statement of facts and that, in 
this instance, he sees fit to discredit the great and glorious chieftain 
by disregarding his statements and by making convenient use of the 
unreliable statements of his enemy. General Howe, hardly recovered 
from the flush of victory, and with the attraction of a possible red 
ribbon of a K. C. B. before his eyes, certainly does say, in his official 
report of September 3, that the American loss is "computed at about 
3,300 killed, wounded, prisoners and missing." Sixteen days later, 
Washington writes to the Massachusetts assembly that "we lost 
about 800 men, more than three-fourths of which were taken pris- 
oners." And yet Putnam's accuser seizes on a report made by the 
British commander at a time when accuracy was out of the question 
and utterly ignores the report of the American commander at a time 
when accuracy was as well assured as possible, all of which is done 
apparently for no other purpose than to reach convenient arithmetical 
results suited to his purpose. 

There is scarcely a doubt that Washington himself saw that the 
result of the advance of the British on Brooklyn Heights would be a 
defeat of the American forces and that his only hope was to make 
this defeat as costly as possible to the enemy. And there is no 
doubt whatever that Washington himself assumed the responsibility 
of the plan of defense, as appears by documents already quoted and 
by his letter of March 16, 1777, to the malcontent Sullivan, in which 
he writes: 

" And what kind of a separate command had General Putnam at New York ? I have 
never heard of any, except his commanding there ten days before my arrival from Boston 
and one day after I had left it for Harlem Heights, as senior officer." 

It must be confessed that the task of confronting Captain Mack- 
ey's charges with the documentary evidence which applies to them 
has already become monotonous in its results. Having dealt in 
detail with the most important of these charges, I will pass, not for 
lack of evidence but for lack of variety, more hastily over the 
remaining charges. 

For startling dramatic effect, all of Captain Mackey's historical feats 
are eclipsed by the wonderful scene in which, contrary to all other 
known authority, he mentions the disgraceful affair of Kipp's Bay 
and the battle of Harlem Heights as occurring on the same day and 
accuses Putnam of negligence of duty in the first instance and of 
cowardice in the second. Some supernatural faculty also enables Cap- 
tain Mackey to determine the fact that Putnam, with a sole view to his 
personal safety, kept beyond the range of the fire of the British at 
Harlem. This being the case, how shall we dispose of General 
Nathaniel Greene's report of Putnam's conduct at Harlem, in a let- 



217 

ter to Governor Cooke, dated Sept. 17, 1776, the day after the battle, 
in which report we read : 

The fire continued about an hour and the enemy retreated ; our people pursued 
them ; and by the spirited conduct of General Putnam and Colonel Reed, the adjutant 
general, our people advanced upon the plain without cover and attacked and drove them 
back. 

Since the burden of proof rests with the accuser, and since our 
efforts to relieve him of that burden have, thus far, only added to it, 
we will, in closing, content ourselves with challenging the following 
statements and demanding proof of them : 

That Putnam was an active participator in the Conway cabal. 

That he was ordered to join Washington at the battle of Trenton, 

That he had 2,400 good troops at his disposal with which he could 
reinforce Washington at that battle. 

In order to establish proofs of these statements it will be necessary 
also to prove that Putnam was not under orders to hold Philadelphia 
at all hazards, and that he did not assist most effectively by diverting 
the attention of the British on this occasion by an advance of about 
500 men under Colonel Griffin. 

I prefer to leave this plain statement as it stands, without any fur- 
ther expressions of opinion regarding the motives which may have 
prompted this attack on the memory of a man of whom it is truly 
recorded that "he dared to lead where any dared to follow." It 
must be added, however, that this attack forms another instance of 
the modern fashion of defaming revolutionary patriots; and the most 
flagrant instance which has come to my notice. 



4^M 



S»S5 



"m^ 





fes- 




MEMBERSHIP ROLL. 



This roll, which is continued only to the date of the 
last annual meeting, May ii, 1896, contains in all ten 
hundred and thirty-eight names. Of these, nine hundred 
and five are names of active, and forty-seven of honorary 
members; a total membership of nine hundred and fifty- 
two. There are also the names of eighty-six members who 
have died, and of whom obituary notices have appeared 
in former year books, or appear in this. There have been 
seventeen actual sons and two daughters admitted to the 
society. A difference between the number of members 
appearing on this roll and the number as reported by 
the Registrar is accounted for by the subsequent re-in- 
statement, by vote of the Board of Managers, of some 
who had been suspended for neglect in payment of dues. 

(*) Deceased members are indicated by a star. 

An index to the names of revolutionary ancestors may 
be found at the end of the volume, 

" No person is admitted without clear proof of the 
revolutionary service of an ancestor. Eligibility once 
established in this manner, supplementary claims have 
been filed and appear in this catalogue, which, although 
believed to be well grounded, have not been proved 
fully in all cases, and cannot be used as a basis of mem- 
bership without further investigation." 

"All statements of service are necessarily much con- 
densed, and it has not been thought worth while to 
cumber the list with detailed accounts of the services of 



220 

Governor Jonathan Trumbull, General Israel Putnam, oi 
Roger Sherman. The world will not permit the memory 
of these men to perish; and to adequately set forth their 
services would require great space, which, it is believed, 
might better be devoted to the claims to grateful remem- 
brance of men whose services, although less conspicu- 
ous, and for that reason more likely to be forgotten, are 
not less worthy of honorable recognition." 

ABELL, (MRS.) MARY KINGSBURY. 
(No. 4g6. Admitted May 28^ i8gi.) Of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-granddaughter of WHITE GRISWOLD (1727- 
1777), who was with the one year men during the first 
year of the war, and participated in the invasion of 
Canada. He was also a private in Captain Theophilus 
Munson's company of the 8th regiment, Connecticut 
line, and was in the battle of Germantown, in which 
he was taken prisoner. He died on board a prison- 
ship in Philadelphia, in the fall of 1777. 

ADAMS, FRANK MARK. 

(No. ^46, Admitted Sept. 75, i8pi.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born in Housatonic, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of PAUL LANGBON, of 
Wilbraham, Massachusetts (1725-1804), Captain of a 
company in Colonel Danielson's regiment at Roxbury 
in December, 1775. 

AIKEN, WILLIAM APPLETON. 

(No. ^36. Admitted May 28, i8pi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Manchester, Vermont. 

Grandson of PHINEAS AIKEN, of Londonderry, 
New Hampshire (1761-1836), a member of Captain 
Jonas Kidder's company, in Colonel Moses Nichols' 
regiment of New Hampshire militia in 1780. 



221 

ALBRO, ADDIS. 

(No. 1 134. Admitted April 21, i8g6.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Middlebnrgh, New York. 

Great-grandson of JOHN ALBRO (1731-18— ), of 
North Kingston, Rhode Island, a private in the com- 
pany of Captain Benjamin West, in a Rhode Island 
regiment commanded by Colonel Topham. He served 
twelve months from March i6th, 1778. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

ALDEN, JAMES EVERETT. 

(No. 5J7. Admitted May 4, i8gi.) Of Torrington, Con- 
necticut; born at South Hadley, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of ELISHA ROOT, of Belchertown, 
Massachusetts (1744-1817), a member of Captain John 
Cowles' company in Colonel Woodbridge's Massachu- 
setts regiment. The company marched on the 20th 
of April, 1775, and participated in the battle of Bunker 
Hill. 

ALLEN, BENNET ROWLAND. 

(No. 133. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance agent and stock broker; born at 
Enfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of MOSES ALLEN (1746 ), a 

private in the 5th regiment, Connecticut line, July i 
to December 16, 1780. 

ALLEN, CHARLES DEXTER. 

(No. i3p. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; literary editor Hartford Post\ born at Windsor 
Locks, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of MOSES ALLEN. \^See 
Allen., Bennet Rowland?^ 

ALLEN, JEREMIAH MERVIN. 

(No. 174. Admitted Eeb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Hartford Steam Boiler In- 
16 



222 

spection and Insurance Company; born at Enfield, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of MOSES ALLEN. S^See Allen, 
Beniiet Rowland^ 

ALMY, LEONARD BALLOU. 

(No. 2g'j. Admitted March 2g^ iSpo.J Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Norwich. 

Great-grandson of NOAH BALLOU (1759 ), of 

Cumberland, Rhode Island. He was sixteen years of 
age when his brother Absalom, who was in the army 
before Boston in 1775, was taken sick and sent home 
for one of his brothers to take his place. Noah went 
to Cambridge and served out his brother's term of en- 
listment. He was commissioned Ensign in May, 1781, 
in a Rhode Island regiment to serve within the state. 

ANDERSON, JOSEPH, Jr. 

(No. 1145. Adjnitted Mai-ch 2j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of GEORGE HAMLLTON (1759- 
1830), of East Chester, New York, who came to Amer- 
ica during the war, enlisted in the army when about 
eighteen years of age and served to the close of the 
war. He was under Washington at the battles of 
Long Island and around New York, in New Jersey, 
and afterwards at Valley Forge. 

ANDREWS, FREDERICK FISK. 

(No. 10J4. Admitted Feb. 22^ iSg6.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Hamden, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOTHAM LVES (1753-1816), of 
Cheshire, Connecticut, who was a private in the com- 
pany of Captain Nathaniel Bunnell in the 5th bat- 
talion under Colonel Douglas, in service with Wash- 
ington at New York in 1776; he was also a private in 
the company of Captain Moses Seymour in Major 



223 

Sheldon's regiment of Light Horse, which accom- 
panied Washington in his retreat through New Jersey 
in December, 1776. Members of this company also 
served during Tryon's raid at New Haven, July, 1779. 

ARMS, F. THORNTON. 

(No. lojj. Admitted by demit from California Society Sept. 
16, iSp^.) Of New London, Connecticut; paymaster 
United States Navy; born at New London. Copies of 
his genealogy and proof submitted to the California 
Society did not accompany the application. In the 
California Year Book he is recorded as a descendant 
of the following Connecticut ancestors: 

Great-great-grandson of HENRY MASON. [See 
Turner, Charles.'\ 

Great-great-grandson of DANIEL BILLINGS. {^See 
Murray., Charles Henry ?\^ 

Great-great-great-grandson of CAPTAIN JOHN 
WILLIAMS, [See Turner, Charles.] 

Great-great-great-grandson of ETNA THAN PER- 
KLNS. [See Turner, Charles?^ 

ATWOOD, EUGENE FREDERICK. 

(No. 644. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut; clergyman; born at Woodbury, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of DANLEL TUTTLE (1743- 
1813), who in 1780 was appointed by vote of the town 
of Woodbury a member of the committee to take care 
of the families of absent soldiers. 

*AUSTIN, WILLIS ROGERS. 

(No. 416. Admitted Feb. 2, i8qi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; member of the Connecticut bar; born at Nor- 
wich. Died March 4, 1896. 

Grandson of DA VLD A USTLN. 

Also, grandson of DAVLD ROGERS. [See Year 
Book, i8g3-4,p. 1^4, and obituary. Year Book, i8p^-6.] 



224 

*AVERILL, HENRY ELIPHALET. 

(No. 6'js. Admitted May i6, i8g2.) Of Perry sburgh, 
Ohio; attorney at law; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 
Died December 3, 1892. 

Great-great-grandson of JESSE ROOT. ySee Year 
Book, 1893-4, pp- 174, 413^ 

AVERILL, JOHN CHESTER. 

(No. 806. Admitted May 10, i8pj.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; attorney at law, and clerk of courts in New 
London County; born at Salisbury, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN WHITTLESEY, of New 
Preston (1741-1802), who was a private in Captain 
John Hinman's company at New York, August 18 to 
September 14, 1776; at Stamford under Captain 
Moresey in October; at Horse Neck in November and 
marched to Rye; was at Saw Pits in December. In 
1777 was an Ensign in regiment of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Parsons. As one of the selectmen of New Preston he 
recruited the quota of men for that society, and col- 
lected and forwarded supplies and ammunition. 




AVERY, FRANK MONTGOMERY. 

(No. ps8. Admitted Dec. ip, 1894.) Of Brooklyn, New 
York; lawyer; born at Brooklyn. 

Great-great-grandson of EBENEZER AVERY, Jr. 
(1732-1781), of Groton, Connecticut, who was a Lieu- 
tenant in the 8th Connecticut regiment of militia, and 
was killed at Fort Griswold in the battle of Groton 
Heights, September 6, 1781. 

*BABCOCK, COURTLANDT GUYNET. 

(No. 36, Admitted April 17, i88g.) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; born in New York city. Died April i, 1896, 



•225 

Great-grandson of Colonel HARRY BABCOCK 

( 1800), who served in command of Rhode Island 

troops in defending Newport. ^See obituary^ Year Book, 

BABCOCK, NATHAN. 

(No. 6ig. Admitted Feb, ij, i8g2.) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Westerly, Rhode 
Island. 

Grandson of DANIEL BABCOCK (1762-1846), a 
soldier of the Revolutionary army. 

BACKUS, THOMAS. 

(No. 5^7. Admitted Sept. 75, 1891.) Of Danielson, 
Connecticut; born at Brooklyn, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ANDREW BACKUS (inz-^l9^)y 
who commanded a company from the town of Plain- 
field, which marched for Boston in the Lexington 
alarm. In 1777 he became Major of the 21st regiment, 
Connecticut militia. 

BACON, WILLIAM TURNER. 

(No. JY. Admitted April ly, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of ZACCHEUS PEASLEE, Lieu- 
tenant of the staff of his uncle. General Moses Hazen, 
and a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSHUA STANTON, 
appointed Lieutenant by Vermont, September 26, 1775, 
and Captain September 5, 1776. 

BAILEY, EZRA BREWSTER. 

(No. ^00. Admitted May 28, i8pi.) Of Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Franklin, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC FRINK, of Stonington, 
Connecticut (1741 ), a member of Captain Eleazer 



2 26 

Prentice's company, in Colonel McClellan's provisional 
regiment of Connecticut militia, in active service in 
1782. 

BAKER, ISAIAH, Jr. 

(No. 1034. Admitted Sept. 16, iSg^.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance agent; born at Dennis, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of ISAIAH CHASE (1763-1838), of 
West Harwick, Massachusetts, who served as a sailor 
on the frigate " Warren " for four months from April, 
1779, taking part in the engagement at Penobscot 
Harbor. In 1880 he served for three months as pri- 
vate in the company of Nathaniel Freeman in a regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Enoch Hurlburt. 

*BALDWIN, ABIGAIL JANE. 

(No. Q2^, Admitted Jan. 16, 18Q4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; born at New Lisbon, New York. Died Nov. 
13, 1895- 

A daughter of HENRY N EARING, of Brookfield, 
Connecticut (1758-1845), who served as a private in 
Captain Joseph Smith's company in Colonel David 
Waterbury's regiment, raised on the first call for 
troops in Connecticut, April-May, 1775. This regiment 
marched to New York in the latter part of June and 
encamped at Harlem; about September 28th it was 
sent to the northern department and took part in the 
operations along Lakes George and Champlain. \^See 
obituary., Year Book., i8q^-67\ 

BALDWIN, GEORGE. 

(No. S07. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at Guilford, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN CHIDSEY, of East Haven, Con- 
necticut (1748-1816), a member of Captain Bradley's 
company of matrosses raised for the defense of New 
Haven at the time of Tryon's invasion, 1779. 



227 

*BALDWIN, (MRS.) HELEN MARIA BOYD. 

(No. 676. Admitted May 16, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at New Haven. Died February 26, 
1893. 

Great-granddaughter of EBENEZER POND. [See 
Year Book^ 18Q3-4, p. lyy, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 

BALDWIN, HENRY. 
(No. pjp. Admitted Dec. 10, i8g4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of ROGER SHERMAN, of New 
Milford and New Haven, Connecticut (1721-1793), a 
member of the Continental Congress and the only 
man who signed all of the four great state papers, 
viz. : The Bill of Rights, the Articles of Federation, 
the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution 
of the United States. 




i^yi^" ^M/r^m^oc/TL 



BANKS, EDWIN. 
(No. P40. Admitted Feb. 11, i8pS-) C)f Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Easton, Connecticut, 

Grandson oiHEZEKIAH BANKS, of Easton, 
Connecticut (1748-1812), a private in Captain Jabez 
Wheeler's company, 4th Connecticut militia, com- 
manded by Lieutenant-Colonel Jonathan Dimon in a 
short campaign at Peekskill. 

BANKS, (MRS.) KITTIE EVELIN GOODSELL. 
(No. ^08. Admitted June I ^, 1 8g I.) Wife of Samuel S. 
Banks, of Bridgeport, Connecticut; born at Bridge- 
port. 

Great-granddaughter of EPAPHRAS GOODSELL, 
of Fairfield, Connecticut (1735 )> who was a Ser- 
geant, May, 1777, in Captain Dimon's company. He 



228 

enlisted January i, 1777, ^n the company of Captain 
John Mills, in the 2d regiment, Connecticut line, com- 
manded by Colonel Charles Webb. This regiment 
wintered at Valley Forge in 1777-78, and was present 
at the battle of Monmouth. 

BANKS, SAMUEL SHERMAN. 

(No. g26. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of H EZEKIAH BANKS. \^See 
Banks., Edwin?\ 

BARBER, WILLIAM POND. 

(No. djp. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of Lieutenant EBENEZER 
POND (1728-1821), who commanded a company which 
marched, December, 1776, from Wrentham, Massachu- 
setts, to Providence, Rhode Island, and who performed 
other military services. 

BARKER, CHARLES COFFIN. 

(No. 800. Admitted Feb. 22, i8gj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; dentist; born at Wakefield, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Grandson of SAMUEL BARKER, of Rowley, Mas- 
sachusetts, and Bethel, Maine (1762-1831), who enlisted 
July, 1779, as a private soldier in the 9th Massachusetts, 
Colonel James Wesson, under Captain Samuel Carr. 
He had the honor of being detailed for personal ser- 
vice to General Washington. 

BARLOW, THOMAS DEWITT. 
(No. loy^. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Redding, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of AARON BARLOW (1750-1800), 
of Redding, Connecticut, who served as a private in 



229 

the loth compan}^, Captain Zalmon Read, of the 5th 
Continental regiment, Colonel Waterbury, from May 
to November 28, 1775. The regiment marched first 
to New York under General Wooster, and then to the 
northern department. He also served as Ensign in 
the company of Captain John Gray, under Colonel 
Samuel Whiting for a short campaign at Fishkill, 
from October 5th to October 19th, 1777. In January, 
1778, he was appointed by the General Assembly, 
Ensign of the 9th company or train band in the 4th 
regiment, under Captain John Gray. 

BARNES, FREDERICK JOSEPH. 

(No. 7jy. Admitted Jan. 26, i8gj.) Of Warehouse Point, 
Connecticut; born at East Windsor, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELEAZER KINGSBURY, of 
Tolland, Connecticut (i 750-181 2), a Revolutionary sol- 
dier who served under General Gates at Saratoga. 

BARNES, THOMAS ATTWATER. 

(No. loj^. Admitted Dec. 16, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; retired merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN BARNES (1760- 

), of Middletown, Connecticut, who enlisted at 

Middletown, Connecticut, in May, 1776, and served for 
three years as a private in the company of Captain 
Sanford, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Brad- 
ley. This company was at the battle of Monmouth 
and was stationed during the winter at Valley Forge. 

BARNES, WILLIAM ALSTINE. 

(No. ioy6. Admitted March 2j, i8g6.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; superintendent of fire alarm telegraph; 
born at Farmington, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JESSE FROST (1763-1827), of 
Waterbury, Connecticut, who was drafted at an early 
age and continued in the service two years and nine 



months as a teamster; in which capacity he carried 
the baggage of General Washington and staff during 
the last nine months of his service. It is said that he 
was present at the execution of Major Andre. He was 
afterwards the pioneer Baptist minister at Waterbury. 

BARNEY, SAMUEL EBEN. 

(No. 4JQ. Admitted Feb. i8, i8(pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; accountant and cashier; born at New 
Haven. 

Grandson of SAMUEL BARNEY (1753-1805), a pri- 
vate soldier in the 5th company, ist regiment (General 
Wooster's), which served at the siege of Boston, and a 
member of Arnold's expedition to Quebec. He after- 
ward served on a privateer, and was captured and con- 
fined on a British prison ship, near New York. 

Also, great-grandson of NATHAN DUMMER, of 
New Haven, Connecticut (1730-1813), who was wounded 
in the defense of New Haven, July, 1779. 

BARNUM, GEORGE STARR. 

(No. gp6. Admitted May 10, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-great-grandson of Captain THOMAS 
STARR (1720-1808), of Danbury, Connecticut, who 
was commissioned Ensign in the 7th regiment, Con- 
necticut line, June i, 1777, promoted to be Second Lieu- 
tenant, January 25, 1778, and commissioned First 
Lieutenant, March 12, 1780; went into the field at Camp 
Peekskill in the spring of 1777, and in September was 
ordered to join Washington's army in Pennsylvania; 
was at the battle of Germantown, October 4, 1777; win- 
tered at Valley Forge, 1777-1778, and was at the battle 
of Monmouth in the following June; encamped during 
the summer at White Plains and wintered, 1778-1779, 
at Redding; in the summer of 1779 served on the east 
side of the Hudson; wintered at Morristown Huts, 
1 779-1 780, and in the following summer served on the 



231 

Hudson; wintered, 1780-1781, at Camp Connecticut 
Village. In the formation of 1781-1783 he was Lieu- 
tenant in the company of Captain Chamberlain, in the 
2d regiment in that line; served to the end of the war. 
He was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati, 
and received a pension. 

*BARNUM, PHINEAS TAYLOR. 

(No. 34g. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; born at Bethel, Connecticut. Died April 7, 
1891. 

Grandson of PHINEAS TAYLOR. {See Year Book, 
i8gi,pp. 70, 207.] 

BARNUM, STARR HICKOK. 

(No. pg/. Admitted May 10, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Newtown, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of Captain THOMAS STARR.. 
{See Barnum, George Starr.'] 

BARRON, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. 621. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Kirby, Vermont. 

Grandson of JOHN BLY (1757-1845), of Cumber- 
land, Rhode Island, who enlisted in May, 1775, and 
served for eight months as a private in the company 
of Captain John Angell, in the Rhode Island regiment 
commanded by Colonel Hitchcock. He also served for 
three months in the fall of 1776 as a private in the 
company of Captain James Williams, under Colonel 
Cook; also two months in the winter of 1777 as Ser- 
geant in the company of Captain George Peck, and 
for two months in the same winter on guard duty in 
the company commanded by Lieutenant Thompson. 
He again enlisted in June, 1777, and served for nine 
months as private in the company of Captain Reuben 
Ballon, in the regiment of Colonel Crary, and again 



232 . 

for nine months in 1778 as a private in the company 
of Captain Caleb Carr, in the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Topham. He removed to Lyndon, Vermont, 
in 1799, and received a pension. 

BARTRAM, EDWARD EVERETT. 

(No. 601. Admitted Dec. 14, 18^1.) Of Lakeville, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Sharon, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC BARTRAM, of Redding, 
Connecticut, a member of Captain Horton's company 
of artificers. 

^BARTRAM, EZRA HARRIS. 

(No. 575. Admitted Oct. 14, i8qi.) Of Sharon, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Sherman, Connecticut. Died 
May 10, 1892. 

Grandson of ISAAC BARTRAM. ^See Year Book, 
18^3^4, pp. 17 g, 40s. 'l 

BARTRAM, ISAAC NEWTON. 

(No. iy8. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Sharon, Connecti- 
cut; builder; born at Redding, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ISAAC BARTRAM. ^See Bartram, 
Edward Everett.^ 

Also, grandson of ISAAC PIATT, a member of the 
same company. 

BATES, ALBERT CARLOS. 

(No. 62. Admitted April 2p, i88p.J Of East Granby, 
Connecticut; born at East Granby. 

Great-grandson of IBM U EI BATES (17 29-1 820), 
who, in 1779, was Captain of the 2d company of 
alarm list in Simsbury, Connecticut, and was stationed 
with his company at Greenwich in July of that year. 



Also, great-grandson of Corporal SETH HIGLEY, 
of Simsbury, who was in New York in 1776 in Lieuten- 
ant Job Case's company, i8th militia regiment. 

Also, a descendant of EDWARD POWERS (1751- 
1809), of Middletown, Connecticut, who enlisted May 
8, 1775, as a member of the 4th company under Cap- 
tain Jonathan Meigs of the 2d Continental regiment, 
commanded by Colonel Joseph Spencer, and served at 
the siege of Boston and at Roxbury until December 
18, 1775. He again enlisted June 10, 1776, in the com- 
pany of Captain Jonathan Jonathan, in the battalion 
of Colonel Philip Burr Bradley, which was attached to 
Brigadier-General James Wadsworth's brigade, and 
served during the summer of 1776 at Bergen Heights 
and Paulus Hook (now Jersey City.) In October the 
battalion was sent to Fort Lee, under General Greene, 
and in November he was captured while assisting in 
the defense of Fort Washington. 

BATES, NATHAN DENISON. 

(No. S3g. Admitted June 5, iSpo.) Of Preston, Con- 
necticut; auctioneer; born at Griswold, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SILAS BATES, of Exeter, Rhode 
Island, who enlisted May, 1781, for three years' service 
in the 3d battalion of the State of Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations. 

BATES, (MRS.) SARAH GLAZIER. 

(No. 548. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Of Long Pine, 
Nebraska; wife of the Reverend J. M. Bates; born at 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of SILAS GLAZIER, of Wil- 

lington, Connecticut (1748 ), a private soldier of 

the Lexington alarm. 

Also, great-granddaughter of ZEBEDIAH MARCY 
(1732-1806), who marched for the relief of Boston in 
the Lexington alarm. 



234 

BATTERSON, JAMES GOODWIN. 

(No. 322. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Travelers' Insurance Com- 
pany; born in Bloomfield, Connecticut. 

Grandson of GEORGE BATTERSON, a private 
soldier in the 7th company of the 5th regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel David Waterbury, raised on the 
first call for troops, April-May, 1775. It marched first 
to New York and then to the northern department. 

BEACH, GEORGE WATSON. 

(No. 24g. Admitted Feb. ly, 18^0.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of ADNA BEACH, of Wal- 

lingford, Connecticut (17 18 ), a private soldier in 

Captain Bracket's company, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel William Douglas, raised in June, 

1776, to reinforce Washington at New York; it was on 
the right of the line of works at Brooklyn during the 
battle of Long Island, August 27th; in the retreat to 
New York, August 29-3oth; at Kip's Bay on the East 
River at the time of the enemy's attack September 
15th; and at the battle of White Plains, October 28th. 
He also served in Captain Johnson's company in 
Colonel Hooker's regiment at Peekskill for six weeks 
in 1777; and in 1780 for six months in the 7th Con- 
necticut, commanded by Colonel Heman Swift. 

BEACH, HENRY DAYTON. 

(No. loyy. Admitted Feb. j, iSpd.J Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; signal engineer; born at Seymour, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of JONATHAN DAYTON 
(i 726-1804), of North Haven, who enlisted in May, 

1777, as a private in the company of Captain The Rev. 
Benjamin Trumbull, of North Haven. He was after- 
wards, in May, 1779, appointed Captain of the 9th 



235 

company of the 2d regiment of the alarm list by the 
General Assembly. This company turned out to repel 
the enemy at the time of Tryon's invasion in July, 1779, 

BEACH, HENRY LEDLIE. 

(No. 284, Admitted March 2g^ iS'po.J Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN HANKS (1755- 

), drummer in the company which marched from 

Mansfield, Connecticut, in the Lexington alarm. He 
was also a drummer in the 2d company of the 3d regi- 
ment, General Putnam's, in service from May 8th to 
December 10, 1775. A detachment from this regiment 
was engaged at Bunker Hill, and a few men also joined 
the Quebec expedition. 

BEARDSLEY, CHARLES THEODORE, Jr. 

(No. ^4p. Admitted Sept, Z5, i8gi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; architect; born at Derby, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH BEARDSLEY, of 
Stratford and Derby, Connecticut (1755-1830), a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. 

BEARDSLEY, EDWARD WATSON. 

(No. 77^. Adinitted Feb. 22, iSqj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Winchester, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS WATSON, of New 
Hartford and Torrington, Connecticut (1763-1850), who 
served short terms in 1778, 1780, 1781, and in 1782 
served for six months in the company of Captain Starr, 
in the 4th regiment, Connecticut line, formation of 
1781-1783, commanded by Colonel Zebulon Butler. He 
was a pensioner. 

BEARDSLEY, (MRS.) LUCY JANE FAYER- 
WEATHER. 

(No. sso. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Wife of Morris B. 
Beardsley, of Bridgeport, Connecticut; born at Strat- 
ford, Connecticut. 



236 

Great-granddaughter of SAMUEL PAYER- 
WEATHER, of Stratford, Connecticut (1761-1848), 
who, March 17, 1777, joined the company of Captain 
Samuel Comstock in the 8th regiment, Connecticut 
line, commanded by Colonel John Chandler. This 
regiment fought at Germantown, October, 1777, win- 
tered at Valley Forge, and was present at the battle 
of Monmouth. In the formation of 1781-83, the 8th 
regiment, Connecticut line, became a part of the 5th 
regiment, Connecticut line, and he continued in ser- 
vice as Corporal. 

BEARDSLEY, MORRIS BEACH. 

(No. loyS. Admitted Eeb. 22^ i8g6.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Trumbull, Connecticut. 

Great -great -grandson of DAVID BEARDSLEY 
(1728-1802), of Stratford, Connecticut, who was a pri- 
vate in the company of Captain (afterwards Colonel) 
Samuel Whiting, in the 5th Connecticut regiment. 
Colonel David Waterbury, raised in 1775 in response 
to the first call for troops; served in New York and in 
the northern department. 

Also, great-grandson oi DANIEL GREGORY {i^SA- 
1843), of Trumbull, Connecticut, who served in the 
2d Connecticut regiment from August i, 1780, to De- 
cember 13, 1780, in the army on the Hudson. He was 
a pensioner. 

BEARDSLEY, SAMUEL FAYERWEATHER. 

(No. 1036. Admitted Sept. 16, i8g^.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; student; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL FAYER- 
WEA TH ER. S^See Beardsley, Mrs. Lucy Jane Fayer- 
weather.^ 

Also, great - great -great - grandson of D A V L D 
BEARDSLEY. {^See Beards ley, Morris Beach.'] 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of ZECHARIAH 
BLAKEMAN (17 20-1 7 79), of Stratford, Connecticut, 



237 

who was a private in the mounted company of Captain 
James Booth, which turned out to repel the invasion 
of the British under Tryon, at New Haven and Fair- 
field, in July, 1779. He was shot by the enemy at 
Fairfield, and died on the nth day of July, 1779, from 
the effects of the wound so received. 

BECKWITH, CYRUS GROSVENOR. 

(No. loyp. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; born at Waterford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of Captain JONATHAN CAUL- 
KINS (i 736-1 787), of East Lyme, Connecticut, who 
served for eight days as Captain of a company under 
Colonel Samuel H. Parsons, in the Lexington alarm. 
In November, 1776, he was appointed Captain in the 
4th battalion, under Colonel John Ely, and served 
under General Wooster and under General Spencer. 
In the summer of 1777 he was assigned to Colonel 
Latimer's regiment, which was sent to reinforce Gen- 
eral Gates at Saratoga, and was engaged in the bat- 
tles of September 19 and October 9 of that year. 

BEECHER, EBENEZER BENTON. 

(No. ^10. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Westville, Con- 
necticut; born at Litchfield, Connecticut. 

Grandson of WHEELER BEECHER (1754-1838), a 
private in Captain James Peck's company in Colonel 
Roger Enos' battalion. He was a pensioner. 

BEECHER, EDWARD COLLINS. 

(No. 677. Admitted Sept. ij, 1892.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of JEREMIAH PARMELEE, of 

New Haven, Connecticut ( 1778), who, in 1775, 

turned out as a member of the 2d company of the Gov- 
ernor's Foot Guards in the Lexington alarm. He was 
commissioned, May i, 1775, Ensign in the ist company 
17 



238 

of the regiment commanded by General Wooster, which 
marched to New York in the latter part of June and 
encamped at Harlem. In September the regiment 
marched to the northern department and took part in 
operations along Lakes George and Champlain, assisted 
in the reduction of St. John's, and was afterwards sta- 
tioned at Montreal. In 1776 he commanded a company 
which formed a part of the garrison at Fort Schuyler. 
On the ist of January, 1777, he was commissioned Cap- 
tain in the regiment commanded by Colonel Moses 
Hazen. In command of his company he received a 
wound at the battle of Brandywine, from the effects 
of which he died the following spring. 

BEECHER, LUCIUS WHEELER, 
(No. 440. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of Westville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Plymouth, Connecti- 
cut. 

Grandson of WHEELER BEECHER. ^See Beecher, 
Ebenezer BentoJi.^ 

BEERS, HENRY CLAY. 

(No. ^11. Admitted Jime 75, i8g\.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at Derby, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN BEERS, of Derby, Connecticut 
(i 758-1848). He was a member of the Continental line 
regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel B. Webb, and 
after this regiment was reorganized as the 3d regi- 
ment, Connecticut line, in 1781, he became a Sergeant 
in the company commanded by Captain Elisha Hop- 
kins. 

BELCHER, WILLIAM. 
(No. 141. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM BELCHER (1731- 
1801), Captain of a company from the town of Preston 
in the Lexington alarm, and in 1776 Captain of the 2d 



239 

company of the 4th. battalion, commanded by Colonel 
Samuel Selden. This battalion served on Long Island 
and in New York, was caught in the retreat when that 
city was abandoned, and suffered some loss. It was 
present with the main army until December, 1776, 
when the term of the battalion expired. It was reor- 
ganized in 1777, as the ist regiment, Connecticut line, 
in which Captain Belcher had command of a company. 
This regiment was engaged on the left flank at the 
battle of Germantown, October 4, 1777. Captain Bel- 
cher resigned January 3, 1778. 

BELDEN, CHANNING SNOW. 

(No. loiy. Admitted June I'j, i8g$.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Whately, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of JOSHUA BELDING (1733-1805), 
of Whately, Massachusetts, who enlisted August 17, 
1777, as a private in the company of Captain Salmon 
White, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Wood- 
bridge, and served at Saratoga. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Committee of Correspondence appointed by 
the town of Whately in January, 1775. 

Also, great-great-grandson oi NATHANIEL COLE- 
MAN (1742-1816), of Whately, Massachusetts, who en- 
listed February 23, 1777, in the company of Captain 
Laurens Kemp, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Leonard, and served at Ticonderoga till April 10, 1777. 
He again enlisted August 17, 1777, and served for four 
days in the company of Captain Salmon White, in the 
regiment commanded by Colonel Woodbridge. 

BELDEN, FRANK ERNEST. 

(No. 77$. Admitted April 18, i8gj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Middletown, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of RICHARD BELDEN, of Weth- 
ersfield, Connecticut (1762-1848), who, in March, 1777, 



240 

enlisted as a private soldier in the company of Captain 
Abijah Savage, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Henry Sherburne, of Rhode Island. He was appointed 
fifer in 1779, and in 1780 transferred to the 3d regi- 
ment, Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel Samuel 
B, Webb. He was appointed Corporal in this regiment 
in 1781. 

BELDEN, FREDERICK SETH. 

(No.yjd. Admitted April 18, I Sgj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of JAMES STEBBINS, of 
Wilbraham, Massachusetts (i 760-1846), a private sol- 
dier in the revolutionary war, 

BELDEN, HERBERT EUGENE. 

(No. 777. Admitted April 18^ 18Q3.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of RICHARD BELDEN. [See 
Belden, Erank Ernest.^ 

BELDEN, JOSHUA. 

(No. 261. Admitted March ^p, i8go.) Of Newington, 
Connecticut; farmer; born at Newington. 

Great-great-grandson of JONATHAN HALE, of 
Glastonbury, Connecticut (i 720-1 776), Captain of the 
6th company in Colonel Wolcott's regiment, which 
served before Boston, January to March, 1776. He 
died at Jamaica Plains, March 7, 1776. 

BELKNAP, LEVERETT. 

(No. 142. Admitted Dec. 12, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookseller; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of ERANCIS BELKNAP, of Elling- 
ton, Connecticut (i 755-1838), a private soldier in the 
loth company of the 4th Connecticut regiment, 1775. 
This company served at siege of Boston. 



241 

BELL, GEORGE SCOFIELD. 
(No. jy2. Admitted Dec. 22^ i8po.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; contractor; born at Darien, Connecticut. 

Grandson of THADDEUS BELL, of Darien, Con- 
necticut (1759 ), who entered service in March, 

1776. When the enemy burned the public stores at 
Danbury, he marched to meet them, and was in the 
battle of Ridgefield, April 27, 1777. From the winter 
of 1778, he served as Orderly-Sergeant with Captain 
Eli Reed. At the time of Tryon's invasion of Connec- 
ticut he participated in the defense of New Haven, 
Fairfield, and Norwalk, and he performed other mili- 
tary services at intervals until 1782. 

Also, great-grandson of THADDEUS BELL, a 
member of the Committee of Safety of the town of 
Stamford during the revolution. 

BEVINS, LeGRAND. 
(No. 'J38. Admitted Jan. 27, iSpj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; born at Meriden. 

Grandson of WALTER BOOTH, (1761-1825), of 
Woodbridge, Connecticut, a private soldier in the 3d 
company of the 5th battalion, Wadsworth's brigade, 
commanded by Colonel William Douglas, which 
served on the Brooklyn front in the battle of Long 
Island, at Kip's Bay, at the time of the attack, Septem- 
ber 15, 1776, and in the battle of White Plains. 

BIDWELL, CHARLES M. 

(No. ig8. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of East Hartford, 
Connecticut; born at East Hartford. 

Grandson of DANLEL BLDWELL, Jr., of East 
Hartford, Connecticut (i 748-1 776), a member of Cap- 
tain Pitkin's company, in Colonel Wolcott's regiment, 
in New York and Westchester, during the months of 
August and September, 1776. He was sent home sick, 
and died the following October, from a fever con- 
tracted while in the army. 



242 

BIDWELL, DANIEL DOANE. 

(No. 607. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of East Hartford, 
Connecticut; journalist; born at East Hartford. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL BIDWELL, Jr. \^See 
Bidwell, Charles M?[ 

BIDWELL, JASPER HAMILTON. 

(No. 150. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Collinsville, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at East Granby, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS BIDWELL, Jr. (1738- 

), an Ensign from the town of New Hartford, 

Connecticut, in the Lexington alarm; Lieutenant in 
command of a company in the i8th regiment of Con- 
necticut militia at New York in 1776; and Captain of 
a company which turned out in 1779 to repel the 
enemy at New Haven. 

*BIGELOW, HOBART BALDWIN. 

(No. iig. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; late Governor of Connecticut; born at 
North Haven, Connecticut. Died November 12, 1891. 

Great-grandson of PAUL BIGELOW. {See Year 
Book, 18^2, pp. 82, 257.] 

*BILL, HENRY. 

(No. SOI. Admitted May 28, i8pi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; born at Groton, Connecticut. Died August 
14, 1891. 

Grandson of JOSHUA BILL. {See Year Book, i8p2, 
pp. 82, 2S4-] 

BINGHAM, EDWIN HENRY. 

(No. S76. Admitted Oct. 20, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Lisbon, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN BINGHAM (1756-1835), 
who turned out with the company from Norwich in 
the Lexington alarm, April, 1775. 



243 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of SAMUEL 
HOLDEN^ of Dorchester, Massachusetts (1737-1808), 
a member of the ist company in the regiment of 
Colonel Gill, when Dorchester Heights were occupied 
by the American forces in March, 1776; and a Captain 
in command of a company in Colonel Ebenezer 
Thayer's regiment in 1780. 

Also, great -great -great -grands on of VERIN 
DANIEL (1737-17 76), of Milton, Massachusetts, who 
served for six days from April 19, 17 75, in the Lexington 
alarm, in the company of Captain Ebenezer Tucker. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of AM ASA STAN- 
DISH (1756-1847), of Preston, Connecticut, who served 
for seven months in 1775 as a private in the company 
of Captain Nathan Perkins, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Danielson. He also served for six 
weeks in 1776 on guard duty; and for three months 
from August, 1777, as a private in the company of 
Captain Daniel Clark, in the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Latimer, and was present at Burgoyne's sur- 
render. He was a pensioner. 

BINGHAM, THEODORE ALFRED. 

(No. iiJS' Admitted April 21, i8g6.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; captain of a corps of engineers of the U. S. 
A., stationed at Willet's Point, New York; born at 
Andover, Connecticut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of STEPHEN BING- 
HAM (1740-1835), of Andover, Connecticut, who was 
appointed by the Governor and Council, September 
9, 1776, Ensign of the ist company or train-band of 
the 12th militia regiment, and to the same position by 
the general assembly in November, 1776. The regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel William Williams, and 
later by Colonel Jeremiah Mason, was attached to the 
5th brigade, and served under Brigadier-General Eli- 
phalet Dyer, and later, under General John Douglas, 
in the campaign around New York. 



244 

BIRDSEYE, ISAAC WASHINGTON. 

(No. g4i. Admitted Feb. ii, iSpS-) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Huntington, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH BIRDSEYE (1740- 
1817), of Stratford, Connecticut, who was a Captain in 
the 4th regiment of Connecticut militia, commanded 
by Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Dimon, and served at 
Peekskill in October, 1777, and again at New Haven in 
July, 1779, on the occasion of Tryon's invasion. 

BISHOP, HENRY ALFRED. 

(JVo. 8g2. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; railroad business; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL HITCHCOCK 
(1757-1841), of Southington, Connecticut, who enlisted 
June 24, 1776, in Captain Gad Stanley's company, 2d 
battalion, Wads worth's brigade; was discharged De- 
cember 25, 1776; he performed other services and was 
afterwards a pensioner. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSHUA NEW- 
HALL, who turned out in the Lexington alarm and 
performed other services. He was a pensioner. 



BISHOP, JOSEPH. 
(No. 32. Admitted April II, 1 88g.) Of West Hartford, 
Connecticut; born at Farmington, Connecticut. 

Son of THOMAS FITCH BISHOP, of Farmington, 

Connecticut (1763 ), a soldier of the revolution, 

who enlisted at the age of sixteen years, and served 
under General Putnam. 

*BISHOP, SETH WOODFORD. 

(No. J J 8. Admitted June 5, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at West Hartford, Con- 
necticut. Died July 30, 1895. 

Grandson of THOMAS FITCH BISHOP. ^See Year 
Book, i8g3-4,p. 83, and obituary, Year Book, i8ps-d.] 



245 

BISSELL, HIRAM JARVIS. 

(No. 620. Admitted Jan. 18, i8g2.) Of Lakeville, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Litchfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN BISSELL, of 

Litchfield, Connecticut (1744-1721), who was a soldier 
of the revolution, and is said to have served seven 
years, and to have been appointed Sergeant. He was 
once taken prisoner. 

BISSELL, THOMAS H. 
(^0. 55. Admitted April 2j>, i88p.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at (now) South Windsor, Connecticut. 

Son of THOMAS BISSELL, a private in the mili- 
tary service during the revolutionary war. 

BLAKE, WILLIAM PHIPPS. 

(No. g42. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; geologist and mining engineer; born at New 
York city. 

Grandson of CAPTAIN JONATHAN MIX (1753- 
1817), of New Haven, Connecticut, who, as a member 
of the New Haven Cadets, marched to Lexington, 
April 21, 1775, and was Captain of the Cadets at Horse 
Neck, Long Island; he joined the expedition to 
Canada, but was disabled and returned to New Haven 
in October, 1775, and joined the party under Colonel 
Sears which marched to New York and destroyed the 
press of the Tory printer, Rivington. He was a 
member of the first naval expedition of the colonies, 
which went to the Bahamas on the sloop " Providence." 
With thirty-five marines, he stood guard over the 
governor for twenty-two days. He was in action on 
the brig " Cabot " off Long Island, and took part in a 
cruise to intercept vessels homeward bound from 
Jamaica, West Indies, which Captain Elisha Hinman 
commanded. In three months' time they captured 
seven sail of British ships, a list of which Captain Mix 



246 

gives in his diary. He was honorably discharged as 
Lieutenant of Marines February 11, 1777. Afterwards 
he sailed as Captain of Marines in the " Marlborough," 
thirty-two guns, under Captain Babcock, again in pur- 
suit of the Jamaica fleet, taking several prizes, 
amongst them the " Nancy." Returning to New 
Haven, he sold his share for Continental money and 
tendered it to the Tory, Joshua Chandler, who had a 
mortgage on his (Mix's) father's house. Chandler 
joined the British and his property, including the Mix 
homestead, was confiscated by the United States Gov- 
ernment, and so was lost to Captain Mix, who to his 
death thought that such a wrong should be righted. 
On July 5, 1779, he took part in the defense of New 
Haven when attacked by Tryon, and was taken pris- 
oner and confined in the old Jersey prison, from which 
he was released on parole, May 28, 1782. 

BLAKESLEE, CHARLES HENRY. 

(No. 80'j. Admitted Feb. 12, iSpj.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; teacher of German; born at Hamden, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN FIERFONT {i']6o-i^S'^), 
who enlisted in Captain Jonathan Brown's company, 
Colonel Lamb's artillery regiment, raised early in 1777. 
He served as a gunner, and is said to have been pres- 
ent at the battles of Ridgefield Hill, Monmouth, and 
siege of Yorktown; also at West Point at the time of 
the capture of Arnold. 

BLISS, FREDERICK SPENCER. 

(No. 646. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL WOODHOUSE, of 
Wethersfield, Connecticut (1756-1834), a private soldier 
of the revolution for a period of fifteen months. He 
first entered service in January, 1776, and was finally 
discharged in 1780. 



247 

BOARDMAN, THOMAS JEFFERSON. 
(No, 376. Admitted Oct. 21^ i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Wethersfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN FRANCIS, of Wethers- 
field, Connecticut (i 744-1824). Sergeant in Captain 
Hezekiah Welles' company of Colonel Erastus Wol- 
cott's regiment, December, 1775, to February, 1776; 2d 
Lieutenant in Captain Elijah Wright's company in 
Colonel Roger Enos' regiment of Connecticut militia, 
which arrived in camp June 29, 1778; Lieutenant in 
Captain Samuel Granger's company of Colonel Levi 
Welles' regiment, at Horse Neck, etc., 1780; and Cap- 
tain in 1 781 of the ist company of Wethersfield, in the 
provisional regiment ordered by the General Assembly 
to be raised and put in readiness in case General 
Washington should call for it. 



i/i^u'i^ -<^'>%f^t>c<^ ^ 



Also, great-grandson of ELIZUR GOODRICH, of 
Wethersfield, Connecticut (1730-1785), a private soldier 
in Captain John Chester's company from Wethersfield 
in the fight at Bunker Hill. He was also a private in 
Colonel Wolcott's regiment, and a Sergeant in Colonel 
Belden's regiment, 1777. 



^d^^^^^Mrcc^ 



BOARDMAN, WILLIAM ELLIS. 
(No. J75. Admitted Dec. 22, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN FRANCIS. ^See 
BoardmaUj Thomas Jefferson.^ 

Also, great-great-grandson oi E L I Z U R G O O D- 
RICH. \^See Boardman, Thomas Jefferson.^ 



248 

BOARDMAN, WILLIAM FRANCIS JOSEPH. 

(No. 14^. Admitted Dec. 12, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Wethersfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELIZUR GOODRICH. ^See 
Boardman, Thomas Jefferson.\ 

Also, great-grandson of JOHN FRANCIS. ^See 
Boardman^ Thoinas Jefferson?^^ 

BOARDMAN, WILLIAM GREENLEAF. 

(No. jyy. Admitted Oct. 21, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN FRANCIS. \^See 
Boardman, Thomas Jefferson.^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of EIIZUR GOODRICH. 
\^See Boardman^ Thomas Jefferson.^ 

BOND, FRANK STUART. 

(No. 170. Admitted Feb. 4, i8qo.) Of New York city; 
vice-president of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railroad Company; born at Sturbridge, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH lOVEII, of Medway, 

Massachusetts (1741 ), Captain of the 3d company 

of the 4th regiment of Massachusetts militia, which 
was repeatedly called into service during the war. 

Also, grandson of EZRA RICHARDSON, of Med- 
way, Massachusetts, a private soldier in Captain 
Lovell's company, who enlisted at the age of fifteen. 

Also, great-grandson of ASA RICHARDSON, who 
served in the same company. 

BOND, HENRY RICHARDSON. 

(No. 16^. Admitted Feb. 4, i8po.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; born at Bangor, Maine. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH lOVEII. \^See Bond, 
Frank Stuart. '\ 

Also, grandson of EZRA RICHARDSON. \_See Bond, 
Frank Stuart, j 



249 

BOND, WILLIAM. 

(No. 808. Admitted Feb. 12, i8pj.) Of New York city; 
born at Sturbridge, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH LOVELL. \^See Bond, 
Frank Stuart ^^ 

Also, grandson of EZRA RICHARDSON. [See Bond, 
Frank Stuart. '\ 



BOND, WILLIAM WILLIAMS. 

(No. 2go. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Vicksburg, 
Mississippi; railroad superintendent; born at New- 
London, Connecticut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTING- 
TON, of Norwich, Connecticut (17 19-1786), who was a 
member of the Committee of Safety, and Major-Gen- 
eral of Connecticut militia, 1776 to 1779. 




fea- 



Also, great-great-grandson of ANDREW HUNT- 
INGTON (1745-18—), of Norwich, Connecticut, Com- 
missary of Brigade, and Assistant Quartermaster- 



General. 



C^4^y^*:^::^^^;|?^ 




Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH LOVELL. 
[See Bond, Frank Stuart.^ 

Also, great-grandson of EZRA RICHARDSON. 
[See Bond, Frank Stuart. 1 



250 

BOSWORTH, (MRS.) LUCY ANN WILSON. 

(No. 557. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Wife of Stanley B. 
Bosworth, of Hartford, Connecticut; born at Win- 
chester, Illinois. 

Great-great-granddaughter of Colonel SAMUEL 
SELDEN., of Hadlyme, Connecticut (1723-1776), who 
commanded the 4th battalion, Wadsworth's brigade, 
raised in June, 1776, to reinforce Washington in New 
York. It served on Long Island and on New York 
Island. In the engagement of September 15th, Colonel 
Selden was taken prisoner, and he died in the hands 
of the enemy, in New York city, October n, 1776. 

BOWEN, JAMES BARTON. 
(No. g>4j. Admitted Feb, 11, i8q§-) Of Putnam, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Woodstock, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ABIEL CHAFFEE (1762- 
1847), of Woodstock, Connecticut, who was a private 
in the 3d regiment of the Connecticut line, first in the 
company of Captain John McGregor, Colonel John 
Durkee commanding; again, in 1780, in the company 
of Captain William Judd, Colonel Samuel Wyllys com- 
manding; and again, in 1781, in the company of Cap- 
tain Timothy Allen, Colonel S. B. Webb commanding; 
his combined terms of service amounting to two years. 
He was a pensioner. 

BOWERS, DWIGHT ELIOT. 

(No. 373. Admitted Dec. 22^ 18^0.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; fire insurance; born at Claremont, New 
Hampshire. 

Great-grandson of CALEB BAILEY, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut (i 760-1828), a private in the 2d 
Connecticut regiment, commanded by Colonel Heman 
Swift. 

BOWERS, EDWARD AUGUSTUS. 

(No. 374. Admitted Dec. 22, i8go.) Of Washington, 



251 

D. C; attorney and counselor at law; born at Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of CALEB BAILEY. \^See Bowers, 
Dwight Eliot. ^ 

BOWERS, GEORGE NEWELL. 

(No. 7jp. Admitted Jan. 26, 18^3.) Of Springfield, 
Massachusetts; artist; born at Berlin, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER ROBERTS, of Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut (1758-1840), a private soldier in 
Captain Joseph Churchill's company in the 3d bat- 
talion, Wadsworth's brigade, commanded by Colonel 
Comfort Sage, raised in June, 1776, to reinforce Wash- 
ington at New York, This battalion served on Long 
Island, in New York, and was engaged in the battle 
of White Plains. From 1777 to 1780 a fifer in Captain 
Elijah Blackman's company in the Continental regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Henry Sherburne, of 
Rhode Island. He was a pensioner. 

BOYD, EDWARD EBENEZER. 

(No. 46'j. Admitted April 21, iSpi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of Lieutenant EBENEZER POND 
(1728-182 1), who commanded a company which marched 
December, 1776, from Wrentham, Massachusetts, \o 
Providence, Rhode Island, and who performed other 
military services. 

BRADLEY, CLARENCE PECK. 

(No. g44. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL BRADLEY {i^ $0-1^1^), 
of Cheshire, Connecticut, who served as a private in 
the Vermont regiments of militia, first in 1778 in the 
the company of Lieutenant Abraham Ives, in the reg- 
iment of Colonel Gideon Warren; again, in 1780, in 



252 

the company of Captain Abraham Ives, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel Ebenezer Allen; and again, in 
i78i,in the company of Captain Abraham Jackson, in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Thomas Lee; his 
total length of service being thirty-six days. 

BRADLEY, GEORGE THOMAS. 

(No. 1 136. Admitted April 21^ i8g6.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; coal merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of EZEKIEL HAVES (1724- 
1807), who was appointed at Branford, November 14, 
1780, collector of the tax for supplies for the American 
army under the Act of the General Assembly. The 
provisions were stored in Northford, or Branford, 
from whence part were carried the next year to the 
army at the siege of Yorktown, the drivers remaining 
to witness the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. 

BRADLEY, MILTON HOBERT. 

fJVo. 1080. Admitted Dec. 16, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; coal; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL BISHOP (1743- 
1821), of N'ew Haven, Connecticut, who was appointed 
by the Council of Safety, in April, 1776, Lieutenant of 
the galley " Whiting," then building at New Haven. 
This galley, with the "Crane" and "Shark," were 
ordered to New York at the request of Washington, 
the two former being captured in the North River in 
the fall of 1776. He was also said to have commanded 
the privateer " New Broom," from the Connecticut 
river, captured in 1778. He was later engaged in 
foreign commerce. 

BRADLEY, NATHANIEL LYMAN. 

(No, p4S. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Cheshire, Connecticut. 

Grandson of DANIEL BRADLEY. [See Bradley, 
Clarence Peck?^ 



253 

BRADLEY, WALTER MINOR. 

(No. lojy. Admitted Oct. zj, iSg^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; coal; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL BISHOP. \^See 
Bradley., Milton Hobert.^ 

BRAINARD, AUSTIN. 

(No. i88. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; attorney at law; born at Had dam, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of DAVID SPENCER (1745 ), 

who marched from Haddam in the Lexington alarm. 
He was a Sergeant in the ist company of Colonel Joseph 
Spencer's regiment in the first call for troops, April- 
May, 1775. This regiment took post at Roxbury and 
served during the siege until the expiration of its term 
of service, December, 1775. He was commissioned Jan- 
uary I, 1777, 2d Lieutenant in the ist regiment, Con- 
necticut line, formation of 1777-81. While he was at- 
tached to this regiment, it took part in the battles of 
Germantown and Monmouth, and wintered at Valley 
Forge. 

BRAINARD, LEVERETT. 

(No. 2^0. Admitted Feb. z/, iSgo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of The Case, Lockwood & Brain- 
ard Company; born at Colchester, Connecticut. 

Grandson of WILLIAM BRAINARD, oi Colchester, 
Connecticut (1746 ), Ensign of a company of mili- 
tia, in the regiment commanded by Lieu tenant- Colonel 
Levi Wells, in service in 1780. 

BRAINERD, FRANK. 

(No. 678. Admitted Sept. 13, i8p2.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; treasurer quarry company; born at Portland. 

Great-great-great-grandson of JOSIAH BRAIN- 
ERD, of East Haddam, Connecticut (1711-1792), En- 



254. 

sign of the ist company in the 4th battalion, Wads- 
worth's brigade, commanded by Colonel Samuel Sel- 
den in 1776. This battalion participated in the de- 
fense of Long Island, served also in New York, and 
was present with the main army until December 25, 
1776, when its term expired. 

BRAINERD, JUDSON BALDWIN. 

(No. dyg. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Portland. 

Great-great-great grandson of JOSIAH BRAIN- 
ERD. \^See Brainerd, Frank. ~\ 

BRAMAN, FRANCIS NELSON. 

(No. 622. Admitted Feb. 13^ i8g2.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Belchertown, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of ST ED MAN NEWBURY (175 1- 
1850), of Waterford, Connecticut, who was a soldier 
and received a pension for his services. 

BRAYTON, CHARLES ERSKINE. 

(No. 80. Admitted April ij, i88g.) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; physician and surgeon; born at Stonington. 

Grandson of SAMUEL DA VIS, a private soldier in 
the revolutionary war. 

*BREWSTER, JOHN DENISON. 
(No. 608. Admitted Jan. 18, i8p2.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Ledyard, Connecticut. 
Died April 30, 1894. 

Great-great-grandson of PARKE AVERY. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILLIAM LA THAM. 
\^See Year Book, 1893-4, pp. 194, 438.] 

BREWER, EDWARD P. 

(No. P46. Admitted Feb. 11, i8qs). Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Norwich. 



255 

Great-great-grandson of JAMES WHITTEMORE 
(1734-1811), of Leicester, Massachusetts, who was a 
Sergeant in the company of Captain Thomas Newhall, 
which marched to Cambridge April 19, 1775, on the 
Lexington alarm. He was also a Sergeant in the 
company of Captain David Prouty, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel Samuel Denny, which marched 
on September 27, 1777, to reinforce General Gates at 
Saratoga, by order of the Massachusetts council. His 
name also appears in the Massachusetts records as 
ist Lieutenant of the ist company Worcester County 
regiment, his commission being dated April 28, 1778, 
and signed by Colonel Denny. 

BRIGGS, ALFRED MILLER. 

(No. 1 1 46. Admitted March 23, i8g6.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; clerk; born at East Killingly, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM BRIGGS (1738- 
18 — ), of North Kingston, Rhode Island, who was 
drafted in the spring of 1776 and served for nine 
months as occasion demanded in the company of Cap- 
tain Samuel Thomas, in the Rhode Island regiment 
commanded by Colonel Charles Dyer. He was again 
drafted in the early summer of 1777, and served at 
different times for about two years in the company of 
Captain John Brown in the same regiment. He was 
in Sullivan's expedition and was a pensioner, 

BRIGHAM, FRANK MARKHAM. 

(No. 1018. Admitted June 77, i8g^.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Rockville. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL MARKHAM 
(i 754-1829), of Chatham, Connecticut, who went from 
Chatham in the company of Captain Silas Dunham 
for the relief of Boston on the Lexington alarm, in 
April, 1775. 



256 

*BRINLEY, GEORGE PUTNAM. 
(No. 486. Admitted May 4, 18^1.) Of Newington, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford, Connecticut. Died August 
24, 1892. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL PUTNAM. 
Also, great-grandson of JEREMIAH WADS- 
WORTH. [See Year Book 18^3-4, pp. zpj, 407?^ 

BRISTOL, CORNELIUS GARDNER. 

(No. 680. Ad^nitted Sept. 13, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con. 
necticut; clergyman; born at Milford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN BRISTOL, of Mil- 
ford, Connecticut (1751-1825), a private in the 3d com- 
pany of Colonel William Douglas' regiment, who par- 
ticipated in the battle of Long Island and in the 
retreat from New York. He was stationed at Kip's 
Bay at the time of the enemy's attack, September 15, 
1776. 

*BRISTOL, PHINEAS S. 

(No. 378. Admitted Dec. 22, i8go.) Of Milford, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Milford Savings Bank; born 
at Milford. Died March 14, 1891. 

Grandson of NA THAN BRISTOL. [See Year Book, 
i8gi,pp. 7p, 203 ^^ 

BRONSON, ARTHUR HART. 

(No. 647. Admitted Feb. 13, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC BRONSON, a soldier in 
the Revolutionary army. 

Also, great-grandson of BLISS HART, who was in 
the Continental army from 1777 to 1780. 

BRONSON, CHARLES FRENCH. 

(No. 1081. Admitted Feb. 3, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Brooklyn, New York. 



257 

Great-great-grandson of TITUS BRONSON, of 
Middlebury, Connecticut (1751-1820), who served for 
seven months from May, 1775, as a private in the com- 
pany of Captain Phineas Porter, under Colonel Woos- 
ter, and for two months in the fall of 1781, in the 
company of Captain O. Foote. He was a pensioner. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of ISAAC B RON- 
SON, Jr., of Middlebury, who served as a Lieu- 
tenant and Captain in the 2d battalion under Colonel 
Thaddeus Cook. 

BRONSON, HENRY TRUMBULL. 

(No. gi. Admitted May 20, i88g.) Of New York city; 
born at Waterbury, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC BRONSON. {^See Bran- 
son, Arthur Hart.'] 

Also, great-grandson of BLISS HART [See Bran- 
son, Arthur Hart.l 

BROOKER, CHARLES FREDERICK. 

(No. pp<?. Admitted May 10, i8gs-) Of Torrington, 
Connecticut; president of corporation; born at Litch- 
field, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ABRAHAM BROOKER (1736- 
1816), who enlisted July 6, 1775, in the 6th company, 
Captain Edward Shipman, of the 7th regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Webb, and served till December 
18, 1775. The regiment was stationed along the 
Sound till September 14, 1775, when it was ordered to 
Boston and stationed on Winter Hill. 

BROOKS, IRVING STRONG. 

(Na. 623. Admitted Feb. 13, 18^2.) Of Easthampton, 
Connecticut; mechanic; born at Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of Dr. ROBERT USHER, of 
Chatham, Connecticut (i 743-1 820), Surgeon of Colonel 



258 

James Wadsworth's regiment, before Boston, January- 
March, 1776. He afterwards served in the hospital at 
New London. 

BROOKS, ISAAC WATTS. 

(No. 22'j. Admitted Feb. //, i8go.) Of Torrington,. 
Connecticut; banker; born at Goshen, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of CYPRIAN COLLINS, of 
Goshen, Connecticut, a volunteer serving under Gen- 
eral Gates at the surrender of Burgoyne, in 1777. 

BROOKS, JOHN WADHAMS. 

(No. 238. Admitted Feb. 17, i8po.) Of Torrington, 
Connecticut; banker; born at Goshen, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of CYPRIAN COLLINS. [See 
Brooks ^ Isaac Watts. ^ 

BROWN, CHARLES WESLEY. 

(N0.80Q. Admitted Feb. 12,18^4.) Of Forestville, Con- 
necticut; born at Saybrook, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JO SI AH BROWN, of Coventry, 
Connecticut (1757-1830), who served in the Lexington 
alarm; and in 5th company, 2d regiment, from May to 
December, 1775; was Sergeant from August 9th to De- 
cember 17th. Was in Captain Paul Brigham's com- 
pany, 8th regiment, from April, 1777, to January, 1778. 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN DUNHAM 
(1761-1855), who was in Captain John Shumway's com- 
pany and Colonel Jedediah Huntington's regiment 
from April, 1777, to April, 1780. He was a pensioner 
under act of 1818. 

BROWN, FREEMAN MONROE. 

(No. 6. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; commission agent; born at Union, Connecticut. 

Grandson of OTHNIEL BROWN (1759 ), a 

soldier of the revolution from the state of Rhode 
Island. 



BROWN, GEORGE SELAH. 

(No. p^7. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g^). Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; born at Bristol, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JO SI AH BROWN. {^See 
Brown^ Charles Wesley^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of STEPHEN DUN- 
HAM. YSee Brown^ Charles Wesley?^ 

BROWNE, JOHN DEAN. 

(No. 200. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Connecticut Fire Insurance 
Company; born at Plainfield, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN BROWN, fifer in the loth com- 
pany of the 6th regiment, raised on the first call for 
troops, April-May, 1775, commanded by Colonel Par- 
sons. When this regiment was reorganized in 1776 as 
the loth Continental, he became fifer in Captain Gal- 
lup's company. After the siege of Boston the regi- 
ment marched to New York, was engaged in the battle 
of Long Island, caught in the panic in the retreat from 
New York, and was with the army at White Plains in 
October, 1776. 

BROWNE, THOMAS NICOLE. 

(No. 1038. Admitted Oct. 75, i8gs-) Of New York city; 
lawyer; born at New London, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS FOSDICK, Jr., 
M. D. (1725-1776), of New London, Connecticut, who 
served in the Lexington alarm, and afterwards for 
thirty days from April, 1775, under Colonel Parsons, 
in the capacity of Surgeon's mate. He held the same 
rank in the 6th regiment under Colonel Parsons, and 
served from May 20, 1775, to January i, 1776. 

BRYANT, EDWARD BALLARD. 

(No.^jQ. Admitted June I ^, 1 8g I.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Cheshire, Connecticut. 



26o 

Great-grandson of JOHN EVARTS STONE (1760- 
1852), of Guilford, Connecticut, a member of Captain 
Bristol's company in Colonel Newberry's regiment of 
Connecticut militia, in active service in 1777. 

BRYANT, THOMAS WALLACE. 

(No. g4. Admitted May 27, i88g.) Of Torrington, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of Captain ISAAC FULLER 
who served seven years in the Continental army. 

BUCKINGHAM, CHARLES BOOTH. 
(No. 8g3. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; furniture dealer; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of JOHN BUCKINGHAM (1744- 
1788), of Milford, Connecticut, a private soldier in 
Captain Bryant's company. Colonel Joseph Thomp- 
son's regiment, from October 5 to October 27, 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of JAMES BOOTH (1734- 
1809), who served as Captain of a mounted company 
from Stratford, 1779, under Lieutenant-Colonel Di- 
mon; also in the ist Connecticut regiment. General. 
Wooster. 

BULFORD, JOHN HENRY. 
(No. 441. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at New Haven. 

Grandson of JOHN BULFORD (1762-1830), of 
New Haven, Connecticut, a private in Captain Gran- 
ger's company of the 2d regiment, Connecticut line, 
1777. 

BULKELEY, MORGAN GARDNER. 
(No. 681. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president ^tna Life Insurance Company; 
late Governor of Connecticut; born at East Haddam, 
Connecticut. 



26l 

Great-grandson of ELIPHALET BULKELEY 

(1746 ), Captain of a company which turned out 

from the town of Colchester, Connecticut, in the Lex- 
ington alarm. In 1780 he was Lieutenant-Colonel of 
the 25th regiment, Connecticut militia. 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM AVERY MOR- 
GAN (1754-1842), a member of Captain Ebenezer Wit- 
ter's company from the town of Preston, which turned 
out in the Lexington alarm in 1775. In the same year 
he was a Corporal in the loth company of the 6th Con- 
necticut regiment, commanded by Colonel Samuel 
Holden Parsons, which was in service near Boston. 
He is believed to have participated in the battle of 
Bunker Hill. He was also a member of Colonel Par- 
sons' regiment, reorganized in 1776 as the loth Con- 
tinental, which took part in the battle of Long Island, 
the fighting near New York, and was present at the 
battle of White Plains. 

*BULKELEY, STEPHEN. 

(No. 43. Admitted April ip, i88g.) Of Wethersfield, 
" Connecticut. Died June 22, 1891. 

Great-grandson of JOHN RILEY. {^See Year Book, 
1892, pp. p2, 25J.] 

BULKLEY, BENJAMIN ANDREWS. 

(No. 5PJ. Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Of Southport, Con- 
necticut; born at New York city. 

Grandson of ELEAZER BULKLEY (1763-1843), of 
Fairfield, Connecticut, who in 1776, at the age of thir- 
teen, enlisted on the brig-of-war "Defence," which 
cruised off Boston harbor in the fall of 1776 and cap- 
tured several valuable prizes. In the following winter 
the vessel sailed for the West Indies and captured 
four prizes. He was discharged in 1777. In 1779 he 
served in a company of coast-guards commanded by 
Captain Eliphalet Thorp. 



262 

BULKLEY, ERASTUS BRAINERD. 

(No. 682. Admitted Sept. 13, i8p2.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; member quarry company; born at South- 
port, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELEAZER BULKLEY. {^See 
Bulkley., Benjamin Andrews?^ 

Also, great-great-great-great-grandson of JOSLALL 
BRALNERD. \^See Brainerd, Erank.'] 

Also, great - great - great - grandson of JO SEP LI 
CHURCHILL (1733-4-1797), of Portland, Connecticut, 
Captain of the 8th company in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Comfort Sage. He participated in 
the engagements in New York, Harlem Heights, and 
White Plains, in 1776. 

Also, great-great-grandson of DA VLB BEERS, who, 
in 1776, was a private in Captain Albert Chapman's 
company, in service at Fort Schuyler. In October, 
1777, he was a member of Captain Daniel Godfrey's 
company in the 4th regiment, Connecticut militia, in 
service at Peekskill. In 1781 he served under Captain 
Najah Bennett at Green Farms. 

BULL, THOMAS MARCUS. 

(No. lojp. Admitted Dec. 16, i8g^.) Of Naugatuck, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Woodbury, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS BULL (1728- 
1804), of Farmington, Connecticut, who was Captain 
in the 5th regiment of Light Horse, and promoted to 
be Major in December, 1776, accompanying Washing- 
ton in his retreat from New Jersey in that month. 
He was at Danbury during Tryon's raid in April, 
1777, and in September, 1777, in response to a call 
from General Putnam to General Silliman, was or- 
dered to join the troops at Fishkill with his company 
of light horse, and also served under General Gates to 
the northward. In July, 1779, he served at New 
Haven and Norwalk during Tryon's raid, and after- 
wards rendered other short services, certain records 
stating that he was present at Burgoyne's surrender. 



263 

BULL, WILLIAM E. 
(No. 1040. Admitted Dec, 16, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; traveling salesman; born at Saybrook, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ^Z^i?/^^ WHITTLESEY 
(1741-1806), of Saybrook, Connecticut, who was ap- 
pointed by the general assembly in July, 1776, mas- 

. ter of the " Oliver Cromwell," first described as the 
"Colony Ship," a frigate built at Saybrook, and 
served cruising on the Connecticut river and Long 
Island Sound. 

BULL, WILLIAM LANMAN. 

(No. 158. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of New York city; 
banker; born at New York city. 

Great-great-grandson of JONATHAN TRUM- 
BULL (17 10-1785), of Lebanon, Connecticut, Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut during the revolutionary war, 
and the only one of the twelve colonial governors 
holding office under the crown who chose to remain 
loyal to his native land rather than to his king. 




BUNCE, EDWARD MERRILL. 

(No. 683. Admitted Sept. 13, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance Company; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of BENJAMIN KIMBALL 
(1741-1779), of Plaistow, New Hampshire, a Lieuten- 
ant in Captain Samuel Oilman's company, in Colonel 



264 

Enoch Poor's regiment from May 25 to August i, 1775. 
In September, 1776, he was commissioned Captain and 
Paymaster in the ist New Hampshire regiment com- 
manded by Colonel John Stark, afterwards com- 
manded by Colonel Joseph Cilley, and continued faith- 
fully to serve his country until he was killed by an 
accidental shot, August 23, 1779. Commissary Joseph 
Leigh wrote from Newburg to Nathaniel Peabody, a 
member of congress, under date of October 14, 1779, 
as follows: "You undoubtedly have heard of the 
Death of Cap* Benjamin Kimball. Poor man ! he 
unfortunately lost his life by the accidental discharge 
of a Soldiers Musquet — 1 conceived him to have been 
a valuable member of society, and the publick, in my 
opinion, has lost a faithful Servant." 

BUNCE, JOHN LEE. 
(No. 684. Admitted Sept. ij, iSp2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-great-grandson of BENJAMIN KIM- 
BALL. [See Bunce, Edward Merrill?^ 

BURBANK, JAMES BRATTLE. 

(No. lyy. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Austin, Texas; 
Captain and Brevet-Major in the 3d United States 
artillery; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Grandson of WILLIAM BRATTLE, of Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts, a Lieutenant of Massachusetts militia, 
who participated in the battle of Bennington. 

BURGESS, GEORGE FRANKLIN. 

(No. 1082. Admitted Feb. 22, i8p^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; wholesale provisions; born at Washing- 
ton, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH PECK (1761-1840), of 
Woodbury, Connecticut, who served three months in 
1777 as a private in the company of Captain Hawley, 



265 

in Colonel Mead's regiment; also two months in 1780 
in the company of Captain Nathaniel Mitchell, Col- 
onel Canfield; also two months in 1781 in the com- 
pany of Captain David Leavenworth, under Colonel 
Canfield; also a tour of one month and another of 
two months under Captain Elijah Hinman, and a tour 
of one month under Captain David Hinman. He 
was at the skirmish of Grigg's Point and at the 
burning of Fairfield. He was a pensioner. 

BURR, HARRIS LOULS. 

(No. g2j. Admitted May 10, i8g4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of JONATHAN BURR (1756- 
1804), of Haddam, Connecticut, who was mustered in 
as a private at New London, February 28, 1777, and 
served under Captain Martin Kirtland, in the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Erastus Wolcott. 

BURRALL, GEORGE BEACH. 

(No. 648. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Lakeville, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Canaan, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of CHARLES BURRALL (1720- 
1803), of Canaan, Connecticut, appointed Colonel of 
the 14th regiment of Connecticut militia in 1774. In 
1776 he commanded a Continental regiment in the 
northern department under General Schuyler. It 
formed part of the forces before Quebec under Arnold 
and Wooster, and after the retreat from that position 
was stationed at Ticonderoga. The 14th Connecticut 
militia turned out for the defense of Danbury in 1777, 
and a part of it marched to Bennington, and a part of 
it joined Gates' army later in the year. 

Also, great-grandson of ADNA BEACH. \^See Beach, 
George Watson^ 



266 

BURROUGHS, JAMES RICHARD. 

(No. 380. Admitted October 21^ i8go.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; real estate agent; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN BURROUGHS 
(1729-1817), a member of the general assembly of the 
state of Connecticut, as representative from Stratford, 
in the years 1779 and 1781. 

Also, great-grandson oi O L I V E R BANCROFT 
(1757-1840), of Newtown, Connecticut, a member of 
Captain Moses Seymour's company in Major Sheldon's 
regiment of Light Horse, which was with Washington 
in his retreat through New Jersey, December, 1776. 
He was also a member of Captain Aaron Foot's com- 
pany in Colonel Noadiah Hooker's regiment, in ser- 
vice at Peekskill, March-June, 1777. 

BURROWS, NELSON HALEY. 

(No. 8g4. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Groton, Con- 
necticut; contractor and builder; born at Ledyard, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of HUBBARD BURROWS, of Gro- 
ton, Connecticut (1740-1781), who entered service as 
Captain in the 8th regiment of militia, September 8, 
1776; in service at New York; was killed September 
6, 1 781, at the battle of Fort Griswold, Groton. 

BURROWS, WILBUR FISK. 

(No. 24y. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Rush, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Great-grandson of JASPER AVERY, of Groton, 

Connecticut ( 1781), a Sergeant who fell in the 

defense of Fort Griswold, September 6, 1781. 

BURROWS, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. 125. Admitted Dec. 12, i88p.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; cashier of the Middletown National 
Bank; born at Rush, Pennsylvania. 



267 

Great-grandson of JASPER AVERY, {^See Bur- 
rows^ Wilbur Fisk?[ 

BURTON, FRANKLIN. 

(No. 552. Admitted Sept. i^, i8gi.) Of Ansonia, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Stratford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of EPHRAIM BURTON, who 
served in the Stratford coast guard in 1778. 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL BURTON, of 

Stratford, Connecticut (1754 ), who also served in 

the Stratford coast guard in 1778. 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL PATTERSON, 
commissioned Lieutenant, March 25, 1777, and in ser- 
vice in Colonel Beebe's regiment in 1780. In 1780-82 
he was Captain of the 2d company of the 4th regi- 
ment, Connecticut militia. 

BURTON, SILAS. 

(No. 55J. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Stratford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of EPHRALM B UR TON. ^See 
Burton, Franklin?^ 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL BURTON. \^See 
Burton, Franklin?^ 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL PATTERSON. 
\^See Burton, Franklin?^ 

BUSHNELL, ASA CARROLL. 

(No. 1083. Admitted Feb. 3, i8g6.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; bank teller; born at Clinton, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ASA LAY (1749-1814), of Say- 
brook, Connecticut, who enlisted in the Continental 
army, May 8, 1775, upon the first call for troops after 
the Lexington alarm. He was appointed Corporal of 
the 9th company of the 6th regiment, on duty at New 
London till June, 1775, when they were ordered to 
Boston and posted at Roxbury as a part of General 
Spencer's brigade. Sometime prior to 1777 he was 



268 

Adjutant of Colonel Ely's regiment. He was commis- 
sioned January i, 1777, Second Lieutenant of the 9th 
company, 6th regiment, Connecticut line, formation of 
1777-1781, serving under General Putnam on the Hud- 
son river and in the various movements of the army, 
including the capture of Stony Point. He was com- 
missioned Captain of the 4th company of the same 
regiment August 28, 1780, and retired by consolidation 
January i, 1783. During his service he was captured 
and exchanged. 

BUSHNELL, FRANK CHAPMAN. 

(No. 8g§. Admitted March 5, i8(p4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Madison, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN BUSHNELL, of Say- 
brook, Connecticut (1750 ), a private soldier in 

Captain Kirkland's company at New London, 1777. 

*BUTTOLPH, CHARLES. 

(No. 8g6. Admitted March 5, 1894.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; born at Griswold, Connecticut. Died De- 
cember 15, 1895. 

Son of GEORGE BUTTOLPH (1744-1838), a pri- 
vate soldier who saw continuous service for four years 
or more; was in the battle of Monmouth, and other 
active service, including battle of Eutaw Springs. 
YSee obituary, Year Book, i8pj-d.] 

BUTTS, CHARLES RICHARDS. 

(No. 4ig. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at New London, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SHEREBLAH BUTT 
(i 733-1807), Captain of a company that marched from 
Canterbury, Connecticut, for the relief of Boston, in 
the Lexington alarm, April, 1775; also Captain in the 
25th regiment, Connecticut militia, which marched 
in the alarm when British shipping lay off New 
London. 



269 

BUTTS, GEORGE COIT. 
(No. 420. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Norwich. 

Great-great-grandson of SHEREBIAH BUTT. ^See 
Butts ^ Charles Richards^ 

BUTTS, HENRY LATHROP. 

(No. 418. Admitted Feb. 2, i8qi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; file manufacturer; born at Mansfield, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of SHEREBIAH B UTT. [See Butts, 
Charles Richards.^ 

CALEF, ARTHUR BENJAMIN. 

(No. 468. Admitted April 21, i8gi.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; Judge of the City Court; born at 
Stratham, New Hampshire. 

Grandson of EBENEZER EASTMAN of Sanborn- 
ton, New Hampshire (1746-T810), Ensign in Captain 
Jeremiah Clough's company, of Poor's New Hampshire 
regiment. 

CALEF, JEREMIAH FRANCIS. 

(No.46g. Admitted April 21,1 8g I.) Of Cromwell, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Middletown, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER EASTMAN. [See 
Calef, Arthur Benjamin.'] 

Also, great-grandson of ASA FOSTER (1765-1861), 
of Canterbury, New Hampshire, a private soldier in 
the revolutionary war. Afterward a Colonel in the 
military service of his state. 

CALEF, SAMUEL PRESCOTT. 

(No. 82. Admitted April 24, i88g.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; born at Middletown. 

Great-grandson of ASA FOSTER. [See Calef, Jer- 
miah Francis^ 
19 



270 

CALEF, THOMAS. 

(No, 87. Admitted May 6, i88q.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of JAMES CALEF, of Dover, New Hamp- 
shire. He was a Commissary, and went from Dover, 
New Hampshire, to Ticonderoga with a team of twelve 
yoke of oxen loaded with provisions, crossing the 
mountains and making a road by cutting down trees 
part of the way. 

CALHOUN, DAVID. 
(No. 810. Admitted Feb, 12, 1894.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance clerk; born at Manchester, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL ROSE, of Cov- 
entry ( 1 748-1 780), who was in Captain Elias Buell's 
company at the time of the Lexington alarm. Was 
afterwards in the Revolutionary army as a surgeon. 

CALHOUN, JOSEPH GILBERT. 

(No. 811. Admitted Feb. 12, 1894.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Manchester, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL ROSE. ^See 
Calhoun, David. '\ 

CAMP, FRANKLIN ABRAHAM. 

(No. P48. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Norwalk, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DAVLD ST. JOLLN (1^62-1^^0), 
who served as a private during the years 1779-1780, in 
the company of Captain Jabez Gregory, under Colonels 
John Mead and Stephen St. John, commanding the 9th 
regiment of Connecticut militia. He was in action at 
the burning of Fairfield and Norwalk, and was granted 
a pension. 



271 

CAMP, HERBERT LATIMER. 

(No. Q4p. Admitted Feb. 22.^ iSq^-) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; banker; born at Middletown. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL CAMP (1723- 
1778), of Durham, Connecticut, who, in November, 
1774, at a town meeting in Durham, was appointed one 
of, a committee "to observe the conduct of all persons 
in this town touching said association;" referring to 
the association regarding non-importations. In 1777 
he was one of the committee of inspection of the town 
of Durham, and on January 24, 1777, the Council of 
Safety at Lebanon passed a vote appointing the com- 
mittee of inspection of the town of Durham a com- 
mittee to have the conduct and oversight of one Ralph 
Isaacs, of New Haven, represented to be a person ad- 
judged inimical to the rights and cause of America; 
he having been, by order of the General Assembly, 
removed from New Haven to the town of Durham; 
authorizing the committee to assign and limit the 
bounds and extent within which, in their opinion, said 
Isaacs reasonably ought to be circumscribed and kept, 
etc.; further authorizing the committee to take legal 
steps for the seizure " for the use of the state of any 
quantity of rum which said Isaacs may have in pos- 
session or the property of." 



CAMP, (MRS.) SUSY HEALY. 

(No. 812. Admitted Jan. 16^ 1894.) Wife of John S. 
Camp, of Hartford, Connecticut; born in Hartford 
City, West Virginia. 

Great-granddaughter of DAVID MOORE, who was 
a Sergeant in Captain Simeon Clarke's company; 
Colonel Thomas Potter's regiment, Rhode Island 
troops, in 1776 and 1777; in Captain Robert Bailey's 
company. Colonel Charles Dyer's regiment, in 1778, 
Was in the battle of Rhode Island. 



272. 

CAMPBELL, JAMES. 

(No. 345. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Manchester, Connecticut. 

(^XQ2X-gr^Vid.^ox^oi WHITE GRISWOLD. [See Abell, 
Mary Kingsbury. \ 

CAMPBELL, (MRS.) MARY CORNELIA PETTL 
BONE. 

(JVo. 668. Admitted April zp, i8g2.) Wife of James Camp- 
bell, of Hartford, Connecticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-granddaughter of JONATHAN PET- 
TIBONE, of Simsbury, Connecticut (1710-1776), Colo- 
nel of the i8th Connecticut regiment of militia. His 
regiment participated in the defense of New York, and 
he died in service September 26, 1776. He was a 
member of the General Assembly in 1773, 1774 and 
1775, being appointed Colonel of the above named 
regiment in May, 1774. 

CAREY, FREDERICK WILLIAM. 

(No. loip. Admitted June ij, i8p^.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; editor; born at Norwich. 

Great-great-great-grandson of BENJAMIN HOLT 
(1748-1809), of Hampton, Connecticut, who marched, in 
April, 1775, for the relief of Boston, serving one month; 
again enlisted as Sergeant, May 19, 1775, and was dis- 
charged December 16. He was appointed Ensign Janu- 
ary I, 1777, in the 4th regiment of the Connecticut line, 
and was in service under Washington at the siege of 
Boston till December 30, 1777, when he resigned. 

CARROLL, ADAMS POPE. 

(No. 146. Admitted Dec. 12^ i88g.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Norwich. 

Great-grandson of AMOS CARROLL (1728 ), 

who turned out in the Lexington alarm as a private 
soldier, from Killingly. He was also a Lieutenant in the 
7th company of the nth Connecticut regiment in 1778. 



273 

CARROLL, GEORGE WYMAN. 

(No. 3^0. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Norwich. 

Great-grandson of AMOS CARROLL. \^See Carroll, 
Adams PoJ)e.~\ 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN CROSBY, who 
turned out with the company from the town of Kil- 
lingly in the Lexington alarm, 1775, and who, in 1776, 
was appointed Captain in the 3d battalion,Wadsworth's 
brigade, commanded by Colonel Sage. This battalion 
participated in the battle of Long Island and in the 
fighting at New York, where Captain Crosby was killed 
September 15, 1776, 

CARTER, CHARLES PHILIP. 

(No. 4yo. Admitted April 21, i8gn.) Of Livingstone, 
Montana; born at Glastonbury, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL B I DWELL, Jr. ^See 
Bidwell, Charles M.] 

*CASE, NEWTON. 

(No. 2/S' Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Canton, Connecticut. Died Septem- 
ber 14, 1890. 

Grandson of JESSE CASE. \^See Year Book, i8gi,pp. 

CATLIN, ABIJAH, Jr. 

(No. i6p. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; cotton merchant; born at Harwinton, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH CA TLIN, of Harwin- 
ton, Connecticut (i 747-1813), a soldier present at the 
battle of White Plains, 1776. 




VeU {^:, 



274 

CATLIN, WILLIAM HOPKINS. 

(No. 736. Admitted Jan. 26^ 18(^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Meriden. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL SELDEN. ^See 
Bosworth^ Lucy Ann Wilson^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of LSRAEL SPENCER 
(i 732-1813), of East Haddam, Connecticut, who was a 
Captain in Colonel Burrall's regiment, raised in 1776 
for service in the northern department under Gen- 
eral Schuyler. It reinforced the troops at Quebec 
under Generals Arnold and Wooster, and was after- 
wards stationed at Ticonderoga until January, 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of LSRAEL SELDEN SPEN- 
CER (1762-1837), of East Haddam, Connecticut; who 
served for six months as a private in the company of 
Captain John Gates, in a regiment commanded by 
John Hill. He also served in 1777 for two months as 
a private, in a company commanded by Asa Washing- 
ton, and afterwards for two months in a company 
commanded by Zachariah Hungerford. He was a 
pensioner. 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL SELDEN (1748- 
1819), of Lyme, Connecticut, who in May, 1777, was 
appointed Ensign of the loth company or train-band 
of the 3d Connecticut regiment, and in May, 1779, was 
appointed Lieutenant of the same company and 
served under Colonel Canfield when the regiment was 
stationed at West Point in September, 17 81. 

Also, great-grandson of JACOB CATLLN (1727- 
1802), of Harwinton, Connecticut, who served as a pri- 
vate from March 29 to May 20, 1777, in the company of 
Captain Aaron Foote, in the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Hooker. 

CHAFFEE, JOSEPH DWIGHT. 

(No. 813. Admitted Feb. 12, i8p4.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; president of the Natchaug Silk Com- 
pany; born at Mansfield, Connecticut. 



275 

Great-grandson of SYLVANUS CON ANT, of Mans- 
field, Connecticut (1751-1843), a private soldier, enlist- 
ing May 8, 1775, and subsequently a Corporal, in the 
2d company of the 3d regiment, General Putnam's, 
1775. He was in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in the 
action on New York Island, when Colonel Knowlton 
of Ashford fell. 

CHAMBERLIN, GEORGE RENSSELAER. 

(No. 6op. Admitted Jan. iS, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of ABIEL CHAMBERLIN (1736- 
1820), clerk of a company from Woodstock, Connecti- 
cut, commanded by Lieutenant Jonathan Morris, in 
the nth regiment of Connecticut militia, at New York 
in 1776. 

*CHAMBERLIN, JAMES HENRY PERCIVAL. 

(No. 610. Admitted Jan. 18, 18^2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at New Haven. Died May 31, 1895. 

Great-grandson of ABIEL CHAMBERLIN. ^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, p. 2op, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 

CHANDLER, CHARLES EDWARD. 

(No. 8py. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; civil engineer; born at Killingly, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SOLOMON CLEVELAND, of 
Connecticut (1754-1823), a private soldier in the 6th 
company. Captain Asa Bacon, in the 6th battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade. He was in the battles of Long 
Island and White Plains. Time expired December 25, 
1776. 

CHANDLER, WILLIAM ERASMUS. 

(No. ip2. Admitted Feb. 4, i8po.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; organist, conductor, and teacher of music; 
born at Longfmeadow, Massachusetts. 



276 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL CHANDLER (1762- 
1804), a Revolutionary soldier of Enfield, Connecticut, 
who, in July, 1780, marched in a company under the 
command of Captain Booth, the expenses being paid 
by the treasurer of the town of Enfield. 

CHANEY, CHARLES FREDERIC. 

(No. 220. Ad7nitted Feb. ly, 18^0.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of WLLLLAM LATHAM, of Gro- 

ton, Connecticut (1765 ), who served under 

Washington near Boston in 1775 as a Lieutenant of 
artillery. He was a Captain in command at Fort 
Griswold, September 6, 1781, until the arrival of Col- 
onel Ledyard, who had general command of the 
defenses of New London harbor. He was wounded 
in the battle of Groton Heights, taken prisoner and 
carried to New York. 




CHAPIN, CHARLES EDWARD. 

(No. po. Admitted May 16, i88p.) Of New York city; 
dealer in electrical supplies; born at CoUinsville, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of SLMEON NEWELL, of Farm- 

ington, Connecticut (1748- ), who entered the 

service in the summer of 1775 as Sergeant in Captain 
Joel Clark's company, of Colonel Jedediah Hunting- 
ton's regiment, and served through the siege of Bos- 
ton. On the Colonel's recommendation, he was made 
Ensign October 18, 1775, and January i, 1776, he was 
again promoted and made Lieutenant in Hunting- 
ton's regiment, reorganized as the 17th Continental. 
This regiment served through the New York cam- 
paign, and was engaged in the battle of Long Island 
under General Parsons. In the October returns. 



shortly before the battle at White Plains, he appears 
as one of the only nine company officers in camp fit 
for duty. His Cincinnati certificate, dated 1786, 
states that he was a Captain. 

*CHAPIN, JAMES HENRY. 

(No. 207. Admitted Feb. ly, i8qo.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; clergyman and professor of geology; born at 
Leavenworth, Indiana. Died March 14, 1892. . 

Grandson of SAMUEL CHAPIN, ^See Year Book, 

l8p2,pp. 100, 262.^ 

CHAPIN, (MRS.) MARY ADELLA GLAZIER. 

(No. ^12. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Wife of Charles 
Edward Chapin, of New York city; born at Glaston- 
bury, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandaughter of SILAS GLAZIER. 
\^See Bates, Sarah Glazier.'] 

Also, great-granddaughter of ABRAHAM WHEA- 
DON, of Guilford, Connecticut (1751-1842), a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. 

Also, great-granddaughter of REUBEN SKINNER, 
of Bolton, Connecticut (1750-1802), who marched for 
the relief of Boston in the Lexington alarm. 

CHAPMAN, ANNIE BLISS. 

(No 68s. Admitted Jan. 6, i8pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Saybrook, Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of ELISHA CHAPMAN, of 
Saybrook, Connecticut (i 740-1825), who had been an 
officer in the French and Indian war. He was com- 
missioned Captain of the 8th company of the 4th bat- 
talion, Wadsworth's brigade, commanded by Colonel 
Samuel Selden in 1776. This battalion served during 
the fighting of that year on Long Island and in New 
York, and was present with the main army until De- 
cember 25th, when the term of the battalion expired. 



278 . 

Later he received a commission as Captain in the 
coast guard. In this capacity he was called into 
active service four times: at Saratoga in 1777, to gar- 
rison the forts at Groton and New London, to repel 
the invasion of Connecticut under Try on in 1779, and 
to prevent the enemy from landing at Saybrook. 

Also, great-granddaughter of ELI AS TULLY, of 
Saybrook (1752-1848), who, in 1775, was a member of 
Captain John Ely's company in the 6th Connecticut 
regiment, commanded by Colonel Samuel Holden Par- 
sons. Later he served as a member of the coast 
guard, and had charge of the boat in which David 
Bushnell experimented among the vessels of the 
English fleet with its torpedoes. 

CHAPMAN, CHARLES SHERMAN. 

(No. 1084. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; cashier; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of EZRA CHAPMAN (1749- 
1778), of Hebron, Connecticut, who served as Ensign 
in the company of Captain Stephen Osborne, under 
Colonel Jedutha Balwin, as an artificer. He died in 
the service near Newburgh, New York, August 31, 
1778. 

CHAPMAN, DWIGHT. 

(No. 2CfQ. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; born at New London, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of PETER COMSTOCK, of New 

London, Connecticut (1733 ), a Captain in the 3d 

regiment, Connecticut militia, at New London, Con- 
necticut, in 1781. 

Also, great-grandson of JASON CHAPMAN, of 
New London, Connecticut (1762-1841), who enlisted 
April, 1 781, in a company commanded by Captain 
Samuel Northam, in Colonel Carter's regiment, for one 
year. The company under Captain Northam was de- 
tailed to meet the French army in Rhode Island and 



279 

act as escort in the march to Philipsburg on the Hud- 
son. He was discharged on account of illness, Decem- 
ber, 1781. 

Also, great-great-grandson of MOSES WARREN, 
of Lyme, Connecticut (1725-1805), who was appointed 
by the Governor and council of safety Captain of the 
2d company of the alarm list in the 3d regiment, and 
commissioned March 21, 1777. 

CHAPMAN, GEORGE PICKERING. 

(No. p5a Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; foreman; born at Warwick, Rhode Island. 

Great-grandson of EZRA CHAPMAN. ^See Chap- 
man, Charles Sherman.^ 

CHAPMAN, HUBERT WASHBURN. 

(No. 1137. Admitted Dec. 16, i8p^.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of LEVI ROUNSEVILL 
(1739-1815), of Freetown, Massachusetts, who was 
captain of a company of minute men which he mus- 
tered, and with which he marched, April 19, 1775, 
from Freetown. The company afterwards became 
a part of the 9th Continental regiment, and served 
till December, 1775. 

CHAPPELL, ALFRED HEBARD. 

(No. IJ4. Admitted Dec. 12, 188^.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New London. 

Great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTINGTON. 
\^See Bond, William Williams.'] 

Also, great-grandson of JEDEDIAH HUNTING- 
TON, of Norwich, Connecticut (1743-1818), who turned 
out with the Norwich company in the Lexington 
alarm. July 6, 1775, he was commissioned Colonel of 
the 8th Connecticut regiment, which was stationed on 
the Sound until September 14th, when it was ordered 
to the Boston camps. This regiment was reorganized 



28o . 

in 1776 as the 17th Continental. August 24, 1776, it 
was ordered to the Brooklyn front, and in the battle 
of Long Island it was surrounded by the enemy, and 
lost heavily in prisoners. It moved with the main 
army until after the battle of White Plains, and was 
disbanded December 31, 1776. January i, 1777, he was 
commissioned Colonel of the ist regiment, Connecticut 
line, and in May of that year he was made Brigadier- 
General in the Continental army. He wintered 1777 
-78 in command of a brigade of Connecticut regi- 
ments at Valley Forge, was present with the main 
army at Monmouth in June, 1778, and encamped at 
White Plains, commanding the 2d Connecticut bri- 
gade, until his division moved into winter quarters at 
Redding, 1778-79; commanded the same brigade 
through the movements of 1779 on the east side of the 
Hudson; wintered at Morristown, 1779-80; was with 
the army again on the Hudson in 1780, and a member 
of the court that tried Andre. He remained in service 
until 1783, when the army was disbanded. At the 
close of the war he received the brevet rank of Major- 
General. 

€HAPPELL, FRANK HUNTINGTON. 

(No. IJS- Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New London. 

Great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTINGTON. 
\^See Bond^ William Williams ^^ 

Also, great-grandson of JEDEDIAH HUNTING- 
TON. {^See Chappell, Alfred Hebard.~\ 

GHAPPELL, WILLIAM SALTONSTALL. 

No. 2pj. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of JEDEDIAH HUNTINGTON. 
YSee Chappell, Alfred Hebard.^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTING- 
TON. [See Bo?td, William Williams.'] 



28l 

CHARLTON, JOHN HOWARD. 

(No. 77S. Admitted April 18, iSgj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Chester, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JAMES OTIS, of England and 
New London, Connecticut (1741-1834), who enlisted at 
Philadelphia in the month of June, 1778, and served as 
a mariner one year on the ship ''Lexington." In the 
summer of 1779 he again enlisted, and served on the 
ship "Alliance" for two years. Both these vessels 
were commanded by Captain John Barry. He received 
a pension for his services. 

CHASE, HENRY SABIN. 

(No. io8s. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; manufacturer and manager Waterbury 
American; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIHU SABIN (1748- 
1828), of Pomfret, Connecticut, who served under Cap- 
tain Zebulon Ingalls for sixteen days in the Lexing- 
ton alarm, and was wounded at Bunker Hill. He 
afterwards re-enlisted, and was granted a pension for 
one year's service. 

CHASE, IRVING HALL. 

(No. 1086. Admitted Feb. 22, i8pd.J Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; secretary of corporation; born at Waterbury 

Great-great-grandson of ELIHU SABIN. \^See 
Chase ^ Henry Sabin.'] 

CUENEY, FRANK WOODBRIDGE. 

(No. 233. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of South Man- 
chester, Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY CHENEY (1731- 
-), of Manchester, Connecticut, Captain of a com- 



pany that marched from the town of Hartford in the 
Lexington alarm, 1775. 



282 . 

Also, great-grandson of DAVID HOWELL (1747- 
1824), a member of Congress under the Confederation 
from Rhode Island, and later Judge of the United 
States District Court, 

Also, descendant of JONATHAN WELLES, of 
East Hartford, Connecticut, a Commissary to provide 
tents, kettles, etc., for troops detached to serve under 
Putnam on the Hudson, during the Burgoyne alarm; 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the 19th regiment, Connecticut 
militia, 1777. 

CHENEY, KNIGHT DEXTER. 

(No. 23^. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of South Man- 
chester, Connecticut; silk manufacturer; born at 
Mount Healthy, Ohio. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY CHENEY. \^See 
Cheney., Frank Woodbridge.~\ 

Also, great-grandson of DAVID HOWELL. [See 
Cheney, Frank Woodbridge.^ 

Also, descendant of JONATHAN WELLES. [See 
Cheney, Frank Woodbridge.^ 

CHENEY, LOUIS RICHMOND. 

(No. 1041. Admitted Oct. 75, 18^5.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; Assistant Quartermaster-General of Con- 
necticut; born at Manchester, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY CHENEY. 
ySee Cheney, Frank Woodbridge?^ 

CHESEBROUGH, AMOS SHEFFIELD. 

(No. 3^1. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Old Say brook, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Stonington, Connecticut. 
Grandson of NATHANIEL CHESEBROUGH, of 
Stonington, Connecticut (1734-1804), a private in the 
3d company of the 6th Connecticut regiment. Colonel 
Samuel H. Parsons, raised on the first call for troops, 
April, 1775. He afterward joined Durkee's regiment, 
and was taken prisoner at the surrender of Fort Wash- 



283 

ington, November i6, 1776. After his liberation he 
enlisted again in the 5th company of the 4th battalion 
of Connecticut, was made Ensign, and served under 
General Spencer in Rhode Island. 

CHESEBROUGH, SHEFFIELD. 

(No. 686. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; bookkeeper; born at Chester, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL CHESE- 
BROUGH. \^See Chesebrough, Amos Sheffield?^ 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA CHAPMAN. 
\^See Chapman^ Annie Bliss. ^ 

Also, great-grandson of ELI AS TULL Y. \^See 
Chapman^ Annie Bliss. ^ 

CHEW, JAMES LAWRENCE. 

(No. 15J. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; cashier of the Union Bank; born at New 
London. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL CHEW, commander 
of the brig " Resistance," holding a commission from 
the naval committee of the first Congress. 

CLARK, CHARLES HOPKINS. 

(No. 22^. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; editor; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JONAS CLARK, a soldier in 
Colonel Fellows' Massachusetts regiment at Roxbury 
and Dorchester, April, 1775, to February, 1776. He 
participated in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

*CLARK, DAVID. 

(No. I. Admitted April 2, 1889.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hampton, Connecticut. Died Octo- 
ber 8, 1889. 

Son of AM ASA CLARK. \^See Year Book, 1891, pp^ 



284 

CLARK, STANLEY PERRY. 

(No. 814. Admitted May 10, iSpj.) Of Ogdensburg, 
New York; dealer in cigars and tobacco; born at 
Ogdensburg. 

Great-grandson of IRA CLARK, a private soldier in 
the company of Captain Bissell, Windsor, Connecticut, 
Colonel Huntington's 17th Continentals. Was missing 
after the battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776; after- 
wards became a pensioner under the act of 1818. 

COE, ANDREW JACKSON. 

(No. 746. Admitted Feb. 22, iSgj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of EZEKIEL RICE, of Wallingford, 
Connecticut (1739-1808), who turned out as a Sergeant 
in a company from Wallingford in the Lexington 
alarm. He was also in the service at New York in 
September, 1776. 

COE, CHARLES PIERSON. 

(No. ^13. Admitted Jmie 75, i8gi.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Madison, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS COE, of Madison, Con- 
necticut (1759-1827), a member of Captain Daniel 
Hand's company, in Colonel Talcott's regiment, 1776, 
and a member of Captain Bezaleel Bristol's company, 
in Colonel Newberry's regiment of militia, in the ser- 
vice of the state at Fishkill, 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL PIERSON, who 
was a Sergeant in the company which marched from 
Killingworth, Connecticut, in the Lexington alarm. 
In 1779 he was a Lieutenant in Captain Bezaleel Bris- 
tol's company, which went in the alarm to East Haven, 
July 7, 1779. 

Also, great-greatgrandson of JEDEDIAH COE, 
who served in the 7th Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Heman Swift, in 1780. 



28s 

COE, EDWARD STEVENS. 
(No. 1042. Admitted Dec. 16^ iSgS-) Of Cromwell, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Middletown, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN SMITH (1756-1834), of 
Haddam, Connecticut, who served in the company of 
Captain Patton in the regiment of artillery artificers 
commanded by Colonel Jonathan Baldwin. He was a 
pensioner. 

COE, LEVI ELMORE. 

(No. P5Z. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Middletown, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of Captain DAVID COE (17 17-1807), 
of Middletown, Connecticut, who was appointed one 
of the committee of the town of Middletown at a meet- 
ing held April 14, 1777, to provide for the families of 
such persons as enlisted in the Continental battalions 
of infantry for the term of three years, or during the 
war. 

COFFIN, ARTHUR DEXTER. 

(No. 24^. Admitted Feb, z/, i8go.) Of Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut; clerk; born at Windsor Locks. 

Great-great-grandson of ABRAHAM FIERSON, of 
Killingworth, Connecticut, Sergeant in Captain Bris- 
tol's company of militia, which turned out at the time 
of Tryon's invasion of Connecticut, 1779. 

COFFIN, OWEN VINCENT. 

(No. 8g8. Admitted April 17, 1894.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; Governor of Connecticut; born at Union 
Vale, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of JAMES VANDEBURGH, 
who was a Lieutenant-Colonel, second in command of 
5th regiment, Beekman's precinct, Dutchess County, 



286 ■ 

New York, from October 17, 1775, to March 10, 1778, 
and as commander (Colonel) from the latter day on. 

Also, g-reat-great-great-grandson of ISRAEL VAIL^ 
who was a Captain in the army and participated in 
the battle of White Plains. 

COGSWELL, FREDERICK HULL. 

(No. 8ggf. Admitted March 5, 18(^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; court reporter; born at Washington, 
Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of DA VID TOMLINSON, of 
Derby, Connecticut, who enlisted at Derby, May 15, 
1775, and was discharged December 23, 1775; was in 
active service at siege of Boston; was also Sergeant in 
Captain Johnson's company, 1776, in the 5th battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade; December 26, 1776, he was ap- 
pointed Ensign in the 6th Connecticut regiment, and 
retired November 15, 1778. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of ISAAC TOM- 
LINSON (i 723-1806), of Derby, who turned out in the 
Lexington alarm, 1775; he enlisted May 15, 1775, in 
the 3d company, under General David Wooster, was 
at the siege of Boston, and was discharged Decem- 
ber I, 1775. 

COGSWELL, LEONARD WHITE. 

(N'o. 1147. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; Superior Court stenographer; born at 
Washington, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson oiNOAH UFSON(i']S^ ), 

of Plymouth, Connecticut, who enlisted April 20, 1776, 
in the company of Captain David Smith, in Colonel 
Samuel Elmore's regiment, and was stationed at Al- 
bany, Fort Stanwix, and vicinity. He re-enlisted 
February 15, 1778, for three years, in the first troop of 
Colonel Elisha Sheldon's Light Dragoons, served on 



287 

the east side of the Hudson and at other points under 
Washington, and was discharged December 2, 1780. 

Also, great-great-grandson oiEBENEZER STEELE 
(17 27-1821), of New Britain, Connecticut, who served 
from October 23, 1776, to December 4, 1776, in the com- 
pany of Captain John Skinner, which was a part of 
Major Sheldon's Light Horse regiment which accom- 
panied Washington on his retreat through New Jer- 
sey in December, 1776. He also served from January 
19, 1776, to February 22, 1776, in the company of Cap- 
tain Abraham Sedgwick, in the regiment commanded 
by Colonel Andrew Ward, and assisted in throwing 
up defensive works in New York and on Brooklyn 
Heights. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of DANIEL COL- 
LINS (i 740-1819), of Meriden, Connecticut, who was 
appointed, in November, 1776, Ensign in the company 
of Captain Augustus Collins, in the 2d battalion, com- 
manded by Colonel Thaddeus Cook. In May, 1777, he 
was appointed Lieutenant of the 5th company or train- 
band in the 7th regiment of militia, and later Captain 
of the 5th company of the alarm list in the loth regi- 
ment of militia. In May, 1778, he was appointed Cap- 
tain of the 5th company or train-band in the 7th regi- 
ment of militia. This company turned out to repel 
the invasion of Tryon at New Haven in July, 1779. 

COGSWELL, RICHARD BALDWIN. 

(No. goo. Admitted April ly, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; assistant agent N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R.; 
born at Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN COGSWELL 
(1755-1819), of Coventry, Connecticut, who removed 
from Coventry to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and served 
in the Massachusetts militia in Lieutenant Stevens' 
detachment, October 15 to October 18, 1780, in alarm 
at Fort Edward. 



288 

COIT, ALFRED. 

(No. g^2. Admitted Feb. 22^ 1S95.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of JOSHUA COIT (1758-1798), a 
member, in 1779, ^^ ^^ Light Corps, composed of busi- 
ness men of Norwich, which was commanded by Cap- 
tain Christopher Leffingwell. It marched for New 
London when that city was attacked by the enemy 
under Arnold in 1781. 

COIT, GEORGE DOUGLAS. 

(No. 243. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Chelsea Savings Bank; born 
at Norwich. 

Grandson of LEMUEL GROSVENOR (1752-- ), 

of Pomfret, Connecticut. Early in 1776 he served as 
Quartermaster-Sergeant in Colonel John Douglas' 
regiment, during its two months' service at Cambridge, 
and later in the same year he was an Ensign in the 
7th company in Colonel Samuel Mott's regiment, raised 
to reinforce the Continental troops in the northern 
department. In June, 1777, he was commissioned 2d 
Lieutenant in Colonel John Ely's regiment, and 
served seven months on the Connecticut and Rhode 
Island coasts. In 1778 he was a ist Lieutenant in 
Colonel Samuel McClellan's regiment, and served 
one year along Long Island Sound and in the valley 
of the Hudson, In 1779 he was appointed Purchasing 
Commissary, and devoted his entire energies to for- 
warding provisions to the army. 




289 

Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL COIT 
(i 708-1 792), of Preston, Connecticut, who was Colonel 
of the 8th regiment of militia, and in September, 
1776, was excused by the Governor and council from 
accompanying the regiment to New York, on account 
of age and infirmities. He resigned in October, 1776. 
He was a member of the committee of correspond- 
ence from Preston and judge of a maritime court. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN TYLER (1721- 
1804), of Preston, Connecticut, who was Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the 6th regiment, Colonel Parsons, raised 
on the first call for troops, April-May, 1775, and 
served at New London and Boston; also Colonel of 
the loth regiment, reorganized for service in 1776, and 
served around New York. He was also appointed 
Colonel of the 8th regiment in October, 1776. He 
was appointed Brigadier-General in June, 1777, served 
in Rhode Island in August, 1778, and in state alarms 
through the war, including the New Haven alarm, 

July 5, 1779- 

Also, great-grandson of ELLSHA PERKLNS, M. D. 
(1741-1799), of. Norwich, Connecticut, who was a mem- 
ber of the Plainfield committee of correspondence in 
1772-74, Surgeon of the 8th regiment under Colonel 
Huntington in 1775, and of the Connecticut regiment 
under Colonel John Douglas, which went to Boston on 
the call of Washington in January in 1776. 




^^A//7&f 



*COLE, CHARLES JAMES. 

(No. 2jp. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; attorney and counselor-at-law; born at Chat- 
ham, Connecticut. Died August 16, 1895. 

Grandson of ABNER COLE. ^See Year Book, 1893-4, 
p. 218, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 



^COLLIER, THOMAS STEPHENS. 

fJVo. J40. Admitted June 2p, i8gi.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; naval officer; born at New York city. 
Died September 21, 1893. 

Great-great-grandson of STEPHEN S. STE- 
PHENS. [See Year Book, iSpj-4, pp. 2ig, 424.'] 

COLLINS, ATWOOD. 

(JVo. 472. Admitted April 21^ 1 8g I.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; stock broker; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of MOSES LYMAN, of Goshen, 
Connecticut (1743-1829), a Lieutenant in the northern 
army, operating against Burgoyne in 1777. 

*COLLINS, WILLIAM ERASTUS. 

(No. 411. Admitted April 21, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; journalist; born at Hartford. Died May 19, 
1893. 

Great-grandson of MOSES LYMAN. [See Year 
Book, i8Q3-4^pp. 2ig, 418.'] 

COLTON, OLCOTT BLISS. 

(No. gs3' Admitted Dec. 10, i8p4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Longmeadow, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS FLTKLN [1^24,- 
1818), of Bolton, Connecticut, who was Captain 
of a company from Bolton, which marched to the 
relief of Boston in the Lexington alarm, April, 1775. 

COMSTOCK, ALBERT SEYMOUR. 

(No. 577. Admitted Oct. 20, i8pi.) Of New Canaan, 
Connecticut; retired merchant; born at New Canaan. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS COMSTOCK, of New 
Canaan, Connecticut (1747-1812), a member of Lieu- 
tenant John Carter's company in the 9th regiment of 
Connecticut militia, serving on the Westchester border 



291 

under General Wooster, in 1776. When Norwalk was 
burned by the British in 1777, Thomas Comstock pro- 
vided for the sufferers for a considerable time, and he 
received a grant of land in the Western Reserve from 
the state of Connecticut as a remuneration for the ex- 
pense thus incurred. 

Also, great-grandson of THADDEUS HOYT, of 
Stamford, one of the most fearless and resolute of 
patriots, who was in Captain Webb's company of 
militia at Npw York in 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of ISAAC LOCKWOOD, of 
Stamford, Connecticut, member of the General Assem- 
bly of Connecticut in 1777, and Captain of the town 
guard in 1781. He was pensioned. 

COMSTOCK, (MRS.) CORNELIA ESTHER CARTER. 
(No. 578. Admitted Oct. 20, i8gi.) Wife of Albert Sey- 
mour Comstock, of New Canaan, Connecticut; born at 
New Canaan. 

Great-granddaughter of JOHN CARTER, of New 
Canaan, Connecticut (1730-1819), who was appointed 
at a meeting held in Norwalk December 5, 1774, a 
member of the committee (supposed to be a com- 
mittee of safety) recommended by the Continental 
Congress at Philadelphia, September 5, 1774. In July, 
1776, he was 2d Lieutenant of the 5th company under 
Captain Elijah Beach, in Colonel Swift's battalion, 
raised for service in the vicinity of Ticonderoga 
under General Gates. In August, 1776, he was Lieu- 
tenant in a company of Captain Daniel Benedict in the 
9th regiment, Connecticut militia, commanded b}^ 
Colonel John Mead, in service in New York city. In 
a subsequent formation in October, 1776, he was 
placed in command of the company and served under 
General Wooster on the Westchester border. In the 
spring of 1777 he was appointed by the General 
Assembly Captain of the 9th company of the 9th 
regiment, a commission signed by Governor Jonathan 



292 

Trumbull being- in possession of the family. An 
original order addressed to Captain John Carter, and 
directing him to march his company to Horse Neck 
and report to Colonel John Mead, dated March 13, 
1777, is also in their possession. 

*COMSTOCK, MOSES WARREN. 

(No. 314. Admitted April 75, i8go.) Of Niantic, Con- 
necticut; retired merchant; born at Lyme, Connecti- 
cut. Died, 1890. 

Great-grandson of MOSES WARREN. 
Also, grandson of PETER COMSTOCK. \^See Year 
Book, iS^i, pp. g>2, jpd.] 

^COMSTOCK, WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON. 

(No. 268. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; retired merchant; born at Lyme, Con- 
necticut. Died, February 24, 1895. 

Grandson of PETER COMSTOCK. 
Also, great-grandson of MOSES WARREN. \^See 
Year Book, i8gj-4,p. 220, and obituary, Year Book, i8pj-d.] 

CONANT, GEORGE ALBERT. 

(No. 6j. Admitted May 11, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Ithaca, New York. 

Great-grandson of SYLVANUS CONANT. ^See 
Chaffee, Joseph D wight.'] 

Also, great-grandson oi JACOB NASH, of Plainfield, 
Massachusetts, who was in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

CONE, JAMES BREWSTER. 

(No. 4^3. Admitted April 21, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of SYLVANUS CONE, of East 
Haddam, Connecticut (1731-1812), who was in the bat- 
tle of Bunker Hill as a member of the Connecticut 
forces. 



293 

CONE, JOSEPH WILLIAM. 

(No. 815. Admitted June 5, iSgj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; fire insurance business; born at East Had- 
dam, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SYLVANUS CONE. S^See Cone, 
James Brewster?^ 

CONE, ROBERT BUCKLAND. 

(No. 816. Admitted Sept. 12, i8qj.) Of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SYLVANUS CONE. [See 
Cone, James Brewster ?[ 

CONGDON, CAREY. 

(No. 7^5. Admitted Jan. 6, 18^3.) Of Ncav London, 
Connecticut; clerk; born at New London. 

Great-great-grandson of WILLIAM TEIV, of New- 
port, Rhode Island (1745-1808), Captain of a Rhode 
Island compan}^ in active service. 

CONKLIN, HARRY SHEPARD. 

(No. 624, Admitted Eeb. ij, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bank teller; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN BARNARD (1732- 
1813), Lieutenant in Colonel Wolcott's regiment, serv- 
ing before Boston, January to March, 1776. Also, 
Lieutenant in Colonel Chester's regiment, raised in 
June, 1776, to reinforce Washington in New York, 
which was stationed at Flatbush pass, on Long Island, 
August 26, and engaged in the battle of the following 
day, in which it narrowly escaped capture. It was 
also in the retreat from New York, and engaged at 
White Plains, October 28. He was commissioned Jan- 
uary I, 1777, Captain in the 3d regiment, Connecticut 
line. In this capacity he served until the reorganiza- 
tion of the regiments, January, 1781, and his diary in- 
• dicates that he continued in the service until the end 



294 

of the war, and was present at the surrender of Corn- 
wallis, October 19, 1781. He was a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. 

CONKLIN, WILLIAM PALMER. 

(No. 62^. Admitted Feb, ij, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bank bookkeeper; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN BARNARD. {^See 
Conklin^ Harry Shepard.~\ 

CONVERSE, ALFRED WOODS. 

(No. jog. Admitted April 75, i8go.) Of Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut; treasurer of the Windsor Locks Savings 
Bank; born at Stafford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JESSE CONVERSE, of Stafford, 

Connecticut (1745 ■), a member of the 3d company 

of the 2d Connecticut regiment, commanded by Gen- 
eral Joseph Spencer, in 1775. Detachments of officers 
and men of this regiment were engaged at the battle 
of Bunker Hill, and in Arnold's expedition, Septem- 
ber-December, 1775. 

CONVERSE, CHARLES AUGUSTUS. 

(No. J12. Admitted April 75, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Salem, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of JOSHUA CONVERSE, of Massachu- 
setts (1740 ), who was killed at Bunker Hill. 

CONVERSE, ELIAB ALDEN. 

(No. loSy. Admitted Feb. j, i8p6.) Of Evanston, Il- 
linois; insurance agent; born at Stafford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOSIAH CONVERSE (1737- 
1814), of Stafford, Connecticut, who was Lieutenant in 
the company of Captain Amos Walbridge in the Lex- 
ington alarm, serving ten days. He was commissioned 
June 26, 1775, Ensign in the company of Captain 
. Elijah Robinson, in the 2d regiment. Continental 



295 

troops, and served till December i8, 1775. In May, 
1777, he was appointed Captain of the 9th company or 
train-band in the 2 2d Connecticut militia regiment. 

COOK, FREDERICK THOMAS. 

(No. 1088. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Terry ville, Con- 
necticut; druggist; born at Plymouth, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS CATLIN {ini- 
1829), of Litchfield, Connecticut, who was appointed 
by the General Assembly, in June, 1776, 2d Lieutenant 
of the 5th company, under Captain Abraham Bradley, 
in the regiment of Colonel Fisher Gay, which was 
assigned to the brigade commanded by General Wads- 
worth, composed of six battalions raised to reinforce 
Washington around New York. He served at the 
Brooklyn front and in the battle of Long Island, and 
was taken prisoner in the retreat from New York, Sep- 
tember 15, 1776. 

COOLEY, CHARLES PARSONS. 

(No. 817. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of ELISHA PORTER (1742- 
1796), a delegate from Hadley, Massachusetts, to the 
General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
in July, 1775, and voted with that body, January, 1776, 
'* to raise a regiment from Hampshire and Berkshire 
counties, and to tender their services to General 
Washington for an expedition to Canada." Of this 
regiment, which served under General Gates at Sara- 
toga, Mr. Porter was made Colonel, and received 
his commission January 22, 1776. He marched his 
regiment via Albany and Ticonderoga, and served 
throughout that campaign. After the surrender of 
General Burgoyne, Colonel Porter escorted him as far 
as Hadley on his way to Boston, and entertained his 
distinguished prisoner in his own house for several 



days. As a mark of esteem, the General presented 
his dress-sword and his tent equipments to his host. 
They are now in possession of his descendant, Samuel 
Dudley Smith of Hadley. Colonel Porter received 
from General Washington, at the close of the war, 
an autograph letter commending him for his services. 
Also, great-grandson of JOHN SMITH, of the 3d 
Massachusetts Infantry, who served in the war of the 
revolution. 

COOLEY, FRANCIS REXFORD. 
(No. 180. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; broker; born at New York city. 

Great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY ROBINSON, 
a Sergeant who fought at Ticonderoga, and was after- 
ward made Colonel in the Colonial army. Also a mem- 
ber of the first and third Provincial Congresses of 
Massachusetts. 

Also, great-great-grandson of EIISHA PORTER. 
YSee Cooley, Charles Parsons?^ 

CORBIN, ALGERNON BOOTH. 

(No. 611. Admitted Jan. 18, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; photographer; born at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Great-grandson of THEOPHIIUS M. SMITH 
(1757-1849), who enlisted at Milford and served for 
two years as vSergeant in the Connecticut troops, apart 
of the time under Captain Samuel Peck in a regiment 
commanded by Colonel Cook. He afterwards resided 
in Plymouth, and was a Captain of militia. He was a 
pensioner, 

CORBIN,. FRANK ADDISON. 
• (No. 421. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant tailor; born at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Great-grandson of THEOPHIIUS M. SMITH. 

\See Cor bin, Algernon Booth.'\ 



297 

CORBIN, FRANK E. 

(No. io8g. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Hartford, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of LEMUEL CORBIN (1740- 
1825), of Dudley, Massachusetts, who served as a 
private in the company of Captain Ebenezer Craft, in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Lamed, which 
marched from Dudley, Massachusetts, April 20, 1775, 
at the time of the Lexington alarm. He was also 
Sergeant in the company of Captain Nathaniel 
Healey, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Jon- 
athan Holman, and served at Rhode Island on the 
alarm of December, 1776. He was also, on September 
25, 1778, commissioned as ist Lieutenant in the com- 
pany of Captain Elias Pratt, in the 5th Worcester 
County regiment, commanded by Colonel Holman. 
He again enlisted in October, 1779, and served as 
Lieutenant in the company of Captain Samuel Ham- 
ant, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel 
Denny. He was also Captain in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Jacob Davis, and served in Rhode 
Island in July and August, 1780. 

CORBIN, GEORGE W. 

(No. p5^. Admitted Feb. 22, iSg^.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; born at New Britain. 

Great-great-grandson of LEMUEL CORBIN. [See 
Corbin, Frank E^ 

CORNWALL, HENRY AUGUSTUS. 

(No. 183. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; agent quarry company; born at Portland. 
Great-grandson of ANDREW CORNWALL, of 

Chatham, Connecticut (1759 ), a private soldier in 

Lieutenant David Smith's company, Colonel Belden's 
regiment, of General Erastus Wolcott's brigade, at 
Peekskill, March-June, 1777. 



298 

CORNWALL, HORACE. 

(No.gg. Admitted Ap7'il 2,1 88g.) Of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; counselor-at-law; born at Burlington, Connecticut 
Grandson of BENJAMIN CORNWALL. 

COTHREN, WILLIAM. 

(No. 4S. Admitted April ig, i88g.) Of Woodbury, 
Connecticut; lawyer; author of a History of Wood- 
bury; born at Farmington, Maine. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM COCHRANE, of Fal- 
mouth, Massachusetts, who served successively as Cor- 
poral, Sergeant, and 2d Lieutenant in the companies 
of Captains Granniss and Elisha Nye, in the Massa- 
chusetts troops in the war of the revolution. 

COUCH, DARIUS NASH. 

(No. jyp. Admitted Oct. 21, i8go.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; late Major-General in the United States 
army; born at South East, New York. 

Grandson of THOMAS COUCH, of Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, Quartermaster of the 5th Connecticut regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel David Waterbury in 
1775. This regiment went to New York in the latter 
part of June, 1775, and in September marched to the 
northern department, and took part in the operations 
along Lakes George and Champlain. 

COUCH, GEORGE WINCHELL. 

(No. 7^7. Ad?nitted Feb. 22, i8gj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson oi JOHN (::6>^C^(i 725-1 806), after 
whom the Meriden branch of Sons of the American 
Revolution is named. He was a descendant of Simon 
Couch, who came from Devonshire, England, about 
the year 1646. In 1747 he married Zube Andrews, a 
descendant of William Andrews, who came from 
Hampsworth, England, in 1635, married a daugh- 
ter of William Gibbands, Colonial Secretary, in 1657, 



299 

and who built the first church in New Haven. Sam- 
uel Couch, son of Simon Couch, was Captain of 
militia in 1690, and the wealthiest and most influen- 
tial man in Fairfield. Thomas Couch, another mem- 
ber of the family, was in the war of the Revolution^ 
being with Montgomery at the siege of Quebec ; 
and in the war of the Rebellion Major-General 
James Nash Couch, a graduate of West Point, did 
distinguished service. Captain John Couch, with his 
company from Meriden, then a part of Wallingford, 
was called out under an act of the General Assembly 
in October, 1774, for the defense of the colony, and on 
the Lexington alarm started at one hour's notice with 
eighteen men, four horses and one wagon. They 
were ferried across the Connecticut at Hartford, 
rested on the Sabbath, and then continued their 
journey for the defense of Boston. In 1776 he com- 
manded a company of eighty-six men which was as- 
signed to duty as a part of Bradley's battalion, Wads- 
worth's brigade, under Washington, and was sta- 
tioned during the greater part of the summer and 
early fall of 1776 at Bergen Heights and Paulus Hook 
(now Jersey City). In October they moved up the 
river to the vicinity of Fort Lee. His company went 
with his regiment across the city to assist in the de- 
fense of Fort Washington, and at the fall of that fort, 
November 16, 1776, he, with his ist Lieutenant and 
thirty-one men were taken prisoners. In 1777 he was 
Captain of a company in the loth regiment. In 1779 
the General Assembly ordered that two regiments of 
volunteers be raised for the defense of the sea coast 
and frontiers of this state and to prevent the incur- 
sions and depredations of the enemy, and appointed 
John Couch a Captain of one of the companies in these 
regiments. He was a man of much force of character 
and of undoubted courage. After the war he held 
several places of honor and died at the age of eighty- 
one, the possessor of much landed estate. 



300 

COUCH, JOHN OSCAR. 

(No. 77p. Admitted April iS, 18^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of JOHN COUCH. ySee Couch, George 
Wine hell.'] 

COUNTRYMAN, FRANKLIN. 

(No. i6y. Admitted Feb. 4, 18^0.) Of North Branford, 
Connecticut; clergyman; born at New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JACOB COUNTRYMAN 
(1739 )■> ^ private soldier in Colonel Clyde's regi- 
ment of the line, Tryon county, New York. 

COUNTRYMAN, WILLIAM ARTHUR. 

(No. 78. Admitted April — , i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; editor; born at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JACOB COUNTRYMAN. 
YSee Countryman.^ Fra?iklin?\ 

COVEY, WILLIAM ELIJAH. 

(No. 780. Admitted April 18, i8pj.J Of Duluth, Min- 
nesota ; life insurance; born at Winchester, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN HURLBUT of 
Wethersfield, Connecticut (1760-1807), who in 1778 en- 
listed for the war in the regiment of Colonel Samuel 
B. Webb. This regiment was present at the battle of 
Springfield in June, 1780, and during the following 
summer served with the main army on the Hudson. 
His service was continued in this regiment, reorgan- 
ized in 1781 as the 3d regiment, Connecticut line. 

COWELL, GEORGE HUBERT. 

(No. 514. Admitted June i^, i8gi.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; Judge of City Court; born at Waterbury. 



Great-great-grandson of GIDEON HOTCHKISS, of 
Waterbtiry, Connecticut (17 16-1807), who served in both 
the French and Indian, and Revolutionary wars, being 
an Ensign in the company from Waterbtiry in 1757, 
which responded to the Fort William Henry alarm, 
and Lieutenant of the Waterbury company in the 2d 
regiment in service in 1758. In 1760 he was appointed 
Captain of the first Waterbury company of militia. 
At a town meeting held in Waterbury, November 17, 
1774, to take action on the "eleventh article of the 
Association of the General Congress," he was ap- 
pointed a member of the committee of inspection, 
who were " attentively to observe the conduct of all 
persons touching that association " * * * "to 
the end that all such foes to the rights of British 
America might be publicly known and universally 
contemned as the enemies of American Liberty." 
And at town meeting held October 22, 1777, he was ap- 
pointed a member of a committee to procure clothing 
for the soldiers. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN BALD WIN^ 
killed in defense of New Haven, July 5, 1779. 

COWLES, EDWIN STEPHEN. 

(No. 2^8. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; discount clerk; born at Poquonock, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of DANIEL KLNG, who 
marched with a Suffield company in the Lexington 
alarm. Also, a member of Captain Granger's com- 
pany of General Waterbury's state brigade, raised for 
the defense of the sea coast in 1781. 

COWLES, FRANK. 

(No. 2'j'j. Admitted March 2p, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; commercial salesman; born at Suffield, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL KING. [See Cowles, 
Edwin Stephen^ 
21 



302 

COWLES, FREDERICK LEONARD. 

(No. 687. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; mantifacttirer; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of JABEZ COWLES, a private in 
Captain Selah Heart's company in Colonel Erastus 
Wolcott's regiment, 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of CHANDLER PARDEE, of 
New Haven, Connecticut, a member of Captain Brad- 
ley's company of artillery, raised for the defense of 
New Haven. He was severely wounded July 5, 1779, 
taken prisoner, and carried to New York. 

♦COWLES, RUEL PARDEE. 

(No. 442. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Berlin, Connecti- 
cut. Died June 19, 1891. 

Grandson of JABEZ COWLES. \^See Year Book, 
i8<p2,pp. 114, 2^1.] 

COWLES, SAMUEL WALLACE. 

(No. ip/. Admitted Feb. 5, i8go.) Of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; loans and insurance; born at Northington (now 
Avon), Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SETH GRIDLEY, of Farming- 
ton, Connecticut, a Revolutionary soldier. 

CRAM, GEORGE WASHINGTON. 

(No. p_5^. Admitted June 11, 18^4.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; contractor; born at Boston, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN CRAM (1734-1836), 
of South Lyndeborough, New Hampshire, who served 
as a private in the company of Captain Peter Clark, in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Stickney, assigned 
to the brigade of New Hampshire militia commanded 
by General Stark, which marched from Lyndeborough 
in July, 1777, and joined the northern Continental army. 
He again enlisted in 1778 in the company of Captain 
Ezekiel Worthen, in the regiment commanded by Col- 
onel Stephen Peabody, and served in Rhode Island. 



CRANE, GEORGE WILLIAM.. 

(JVo. 1043. Admitted Oct. 75, iSgS-) ^^ New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Ogdensburg, New 
York. 

Great-great-grandson of EZRA CRANE {\^i^ ), 

of Killingworth, Connecticut, who was a private and 
Sergeant in the 7th regiment, Connecticut line, under 
Colonel Heman Swift, from June 27 to December 9, 
1780, in service along the Hudson river. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ZEBULON HOLMES 

(1735 )> ^^ Stoughtonham, Massachusetts, who 

served four days in the company of Captain Edward 
Bridge Savell, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Robinson, which marched in the Lexington alarm, 
April 19, 1775. He was also Corporal in the company 
of Captain Samuel Payson, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Joseph Reed, and served for eight 
months from May, 1775. He also served two days in 
the same company in March, 1776, on the alarm from 
Rhode Island. He was also a private in the company 
of Captain Elias Whiting, in the regiment commanded 
by Colonel Wheelock, in service at Ticonderoga in 
August, 1776. He also served in the company of Cap- 
tain Stephen Penniman in a regiment commanded by 
Colonel Dikes, from December 13, 1776, to March i^ 
1777. He again enlisted, April 18, 1777, in the com- 
pany of Captain Robert Swan, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Benjamin Gills, for service at 
Rhode Island, and was discharged May 12, 1777. He 
also enlisted in May, 1778, in a company from Suffolk 
County, which was raised under the resolve of April 
20, 1778, for the term of nine months from the time 
of their arrival at Fishkill, the company being com- 
manded by Captain Savell, and attached to the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Gills. He also served 
for six months in 1780, in a company raised to rein- 
force the Continental army, agreeably to the resolve 
of June 5, 1780. 



3^4 

*CRUMP, JOHN GUY. 

(No. 140. Admitted Dec. 11, i88g.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; Judge Court of Common Pleas, Died 
June 19, 1894. 

Great-grandson of RICHARD LAW. \^See Year 
Book, i8gj-4,p. 22"/, and obituary, Year Book, iS'pj-d.] 

CURTIN, ROLAND GIDEON. 

(No. 4^4. Admitted April 21,1 8g I.) Of Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania; physician; born at Belief onte, Pennsylvania. 
Great-grandson of the Reverend AARON KINNE, 
of Groton, Connecticut (i 745-1824), Chaplain of the 
force assembled for the defense of Fort Griswold in 
1781, under the command of Colonel William Ledyard. 

CURTIS, GEORGE MUNSON. 

(No. poi. Admitted April 77, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Meriden Britannia Com- 
pany; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson oi RUFUS MUNSON, of Lanesboro, 
Massachusetts (1763-1797), a private soldier in the 
company commanded by Captain Gideon Ormsby, 
Colonel Ira Allen's regiment, Vermont militia, 1780. 
He performed other service in 1781 and 1782. 

CUTLER, RALPH WILLIAM. 

(No. 205. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Hartford Trust Company; 
born at Newton, Massachusetts 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER CUTLER (1747- 
1814), a private in Captain " Ruben Read's " company 
of Western, Massachusetts, in the Lexington alarm. 
He probably performed other service, for in 1782 his 
name appears upon the records of the town of Western 
as Lieutenant Ebenezer Cutler. 



30S 

DANFORTH, JAMES ROMEYN, Jr. 
(No. g^6. Admitted Feb. ii, i8gs.) Of Mystic, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Woodstock, Illinois. 

Great-great-grandson of DANIEL EMERSON 
(i 746-1820), of Hollis, New Hampshire, who was Cap- 
tain of a company of New Hampshire troops sent to 
Ticonderoga in July, 1777, and again Captain of a 
company sent to Rhode Island in June, 1779. 

DANFORTH, JOSEPH WARREN. 

(No. J40. Admitted Jan. 26, iSgj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of CHARLES GAYLORB, 
of Bristol, Connecticut (1740-1777), who died in the 
service in 1777. 

DANIELS, FREDERICK JENNINGS. 

(No. 1044. Admitted Oct. 75, iSg^.) Of Putnam, Con- 
necticut; coal merchant; born at Oxford, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN HARRIS, of 
Oxford, Massachusetts, who was a private in the 
company of Captain Ebenezer Humphrey, in the reg- 
iment of Colonel Jacob Davis, in service in Rhode 
Island "on the alarm" for twelve days, from July 30, 
1780. 

DANN, HORACE EDGAR. 

(No. 818. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; livery stable keeper; born at New Canaan, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SQUIRE DANN (i 748-1833), 
who enlisted as a private in the ist company of the 
5th Connecticut regiment under Colonel Waterbury, 
May 8, 1775. He afterwards enlisted in Captain Chap- 
man's company, Colonel Samuel Elmore's battalion of 
forces, April 16, 1776. 



3o6 

DANN, WALLACE. 

(JVo. Sip. Admitted Jan. i6, 18^4.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; Chief of Police; born at Stamford, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of SQUIRE DANN. ^See Bann, 
Horace Edgar. ^ 

DASKAM, SAMUEL. 

(No. 688. Admitted Jan. d, i8pj.J Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; born at Norwalk. 

Grandson of WILLIAM (DASCOM) DASKAM, of 
Darien, Connecticut, a Revolutionary soldier and a 
pensioner. 

DAVIS, CHARLES ETHAN. 

(No. 64p. Admitted March 26, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; mechanical engineer; born at Holden, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of JAMES DAVIS, of Holden, 
Massachusetts (1734- 182 1), commander of a company 
of minute-men which turned out in the Lexington 
alarm. He also commanded a company of militia 
which marched to Hadley in 1777. 

DAVIS, SOLON PERIANDER. 
(No. 6^0. Admitted March 26, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; teacher; born at Holden, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of JAMES DAVIS. {See Davis, 
Charles Ethan.'] 

DEMING, EDWARD HOOKER. 

(No. 575. Admitted June 75, i8pi.) Of Farmington, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of JOHN MIX, of Farmington, 
Connecticut (1755-1834), Ensign in the 5th battalion^ 
Wadsworth's brigade, commanded by Colonel William 



3«7 

Douglas 111 1776. This battalion served in the city of 
New York and on the Brooklyn front, being at the 
right of the line of works during the battle of Long 
Island. It formed a part of the force at Kip's Bay on 
the East river, at the time of the enemy's attack Sep- 
tember 15, 1776, and participated in the battle of White 
Plains in October of the same year. January i, 1777, 
he was commissioned Ensign in the 3d regiment, Con- 
necticut line, and transferred November 15, 1778, to 
the 2d regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by 
Colonel Charles Webb, of which he was appointed 
Adjutant. In the formation of 1781 to 1783 he was 
Lieutenant in the 3d regiment, Connecticut line, com- 
manded by Colonel Samuel B. Webb, and was retired 
with the army, June, 1783. He was a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati and the Secretary of the 
Connecticut branch. After the peace he served his 
town ten years as judge of probate, thirty-two years 
as town clerk, and twenty-six years as representative 
in the General Assembly. 

DEMING, FERDINAND, Jr. 
(No. 1148. Admitted March 2j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of RO SWELL WHEATON 
(i 758-1842), of Woodbury, Connecticut, who served as 
a private in the war for seven years, a portion of the 
time in the company of Captain Stephen Potter, in 
the 4th regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by 
Colonel Zebulon Butler, and a portion of the time in 
the company of Captain Jonas Prentiss, under Colonel 
Douglas. He was a pensioner. 

DEMING, LUCIUS PARMENIAS. 

(No. 2. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at West Stockbridge, Massachu- 
setts. 



3o8 

Great-grandson of EPHRAIM SLAUTER (1755- 
-), a Sergeant in Captain Theodore Woodbridge's 



company, in the 7th Connecticut line, formation of 
1777 to 1 781, commanded by Colonel Heman Swift. 
He was in the battle of Germantown, October 4, 1777, 
and spent the winter with the army at Valley Forge. 
He had been severely injured at the taking of Fort 
Washington, November, 1776, and finally, on account 
of this injury, which rendered him incapable of active 
service, was honorably discharged. 

Also, great-great-grandson of GILBERT SLAU- 
TER, a private soldier of Colonel Thomas' New York 
regiment; killed in action, November 12, 1778, 

DENISON, CHARLES WILBERFORCE. 

(No. 257. Admitted March 2g, iSgo.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Wilmington, Delaware. 

Grandson of Captain JOSEPH PALMER, of Ston- 
ington, Connecticut, a Revolutionary soldier. 

DENISON, FREDERIC. 

(JVo. 68g. Admitted Sept. 13, i8q2.) Of Mystic, Connecti- 
cut; merchant; born at Groton, Connecticut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of BENADAM GAL- 
LUP, of Groton, Connecticut (17 16-1800), Lieutenant- 
Colonel in Colonel Enos' battalion, who served with 
ability and success until he received his discharge on 
account of age and physical disability, February 27, 
1777. 

DENISON, LEE SHANNON. 

(No. 104^. Admitted Dec. 16, i8q^.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at New London. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL MASON of New 
London, Connecticut, who was a private in the ist 
company of the 3d regiment, Connecticut militia, 
under Captain John Hempstead. 



3^9 

DEWELL, JAMES DUDLEY. 

(No. 164. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Norfolk, Connecticut, 

Great-grandson of ASAHEL HUMPHREY.oi Nor- 
folk, Connecticut (1747-1827), who in 1776 was Sergeant 
in the first artillery company raised in Connecticut 
under Captain John Bigelow; marched to the north- 
ern department and was stationed at Ticonderoga and 
vicinity. He was a pensioner. He was elected a 
deputy to the General Assembly in 1778, 1786, 1787 and 
1788, and a delegate to the convention in 1788 which 
ratified the Constitution, 

DEWELL, JAMES DUDLEY, Jr. 

(No. 820. Admitted Feb. 12^ 18^4.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of ASAHEL HUMPHREY. 
\^See Dewell, James Dudley. '\ 

^DICKERSON, DAVID, 

(No. 381. Admitted Oct. 12^ i8go.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; mechanic; born at Chatham, Connecti- 
cut. Died October 2, 1891. 

Grandson of EZRA POTTER. \^See Year Book, 1892^ 
pp. 117, 2sS.] 

DOOLITTLE, EDGAR JARED. 

(No. 748. Admitted Feb. 22, r8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Hebron, Connecticut, 

Great-great-grandson of ISAAC HALL ( 1798), 

Captain of a company in the regiment of light horse, 
of which William Hart was Major in 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM SAGE, of Crom- 
well, Connecticut (i 748-1 833), who turned out from 
Middletown in the Lexington alarm. He is believed 
to have participated in the battle of Bunker Hill. He 
was known as "Captain Sage." 



*DOUGLAS, BENJAMIN. 

(No. 48. Admitted April 20, i88g.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Northford, Con- 
necticut. Died January 26, 1894. 

Grandson of Colonel WILLIAM DOUGLAS. ^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, p. 2j2, and obituary. Year Book, i8p^-6.^ 

DOWNES, WILLIAM ELIJAH. 

(No. 57-5, Admitted June zj, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Milford, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN DOWNS, of Milford, Connecti- 
cut (i 745-1819). He was an Orderly-Sergeant, and 
served on Long Island and in New York during the 
fighting in 1776. In 1777 he was a Quartermaster in 
Lieutenant-Colonel Ferris' regiment at Peekskill. He 
performed other service in 1778, and in 1779 he turned 
out to repel the enemy at New Haven. 

DRAKE, FREDERICK AUGUSTINE. 
(No. jp6. Admitted Dec. 22, i8go.) Of Windsor, Con- 
necticut; retired merchant; born at Windsor. 

Grandson of AUGUSTINE DRAKE, of Windsor, 

Connecticut (1742 ), an Adjutant in the battle at 

White Plains. 

Also, grandson of Captain DANIEL GILLETT, 
who was with Ethan Allen in Vermont, and a volun- 
teer to repel the British at Danbury. 

DREW, HENRY BURR. 
(No. 57p. Admitted Oct. 14, i8gi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; cashier of the Connecticut National bank; 
born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER MERRITT, of 
Redding and Huntington, Connecticut (i 762-1 826), 
who, commencing October, 1778, served four months 
in team-service in Captain Samuel Taylor's company. 



April I, 1779, he enlisted for one year under Captain 
Eliphalet Thorp, Colonel Whiting's regiment, and 
served until October, 1779, when he hired a man to 
take his place for the remainder of his time. He also 
served in the 8th regiment, Connecticut line, forma 
tion of 1778-81, in Captain Paul Brigham's company. 



DRIGGS, GEORGE ASA. 
(No. logo. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-great-grandson of JON A THAN BALD- 
WIN^ Jr. (1722-1802), of Waterbury, Connecticut, who 
was a deputy to the General Court from Waterbury 
for several years prior to 1776. In October, 1774, he 
was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the loth regi- 
ment of militia. In January, 1775, he was appointed 
one of the committee from Waterbury to receive 
donations for the poor of Boston suffering from the 
operations of the Boston Port Bill. August 17, 1776, 
and within ten days after Washington's call, he 
marched with his regiment for the relief of New 
York. His regiment was in the engagements around 
New York, and at the battle of Harlem Heights, Sep- 
tember 15. In 1777 he was stationed at Fishkill to 
guard the Highlands. He continued in the service 
till 1780, when he resigned. 



*DUNHAM, RALPH CLARK. 

(No. 168. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of New Britain, Con- 
necticut; born at Mansfield, Connecticut. Died Feb- 
jTuary 11, 1896. 

Grandson of JON A THAN D UN HAM. 
Also, grandson of ELIJAH CLARK HYDE. 
Also, great-grandson of ELIJAH HYDE. \^See Year 
Book., i8pj-4, p. jjj, and obituary., Year Book., i8g^-6^ 



312 

DUNHAM, SYLVESTER CLARK. 
(No. ii8. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Mansfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN DUNHAM, a pri- 
vate soldier in the war of the revolution. 

Also, g-reat-grandson of ELIJAH CLARK HYDE, 
a private soldier. 

Also, great-grandson of JESSE ELDRIDGE, a pri- 
vate soldier. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH HUNT, a private 
soldier. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ELIJAH HYDE, of 
Norwich, Connecticut (1735 ), Major command- 
ing the 2d regiment of light horse. This regiment 
was in the battle of Stillwater, October 2, 1777. 

DUSTIN, CHARLES EDWARD. 

(No. 626. Admitted Eeb. 13,1 8g2.) Of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; electricity; born at Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL DUSTIN (i^s^- 

1815), a private soldier of Haverhill, Massachusetts, in 
a company commanded by Captain Francis, under 
Colonel Mansfield, in 1775, stationed at Cambridge. 
Nathaniel Dustin was a great-grandson of Mrs. 
Thomas Dustin, who was captured by a party of In- 
dians in 1679 with her nurse and one child, and who, 
after a captivity of several days, killed twelve of the 
savages and escaped. The story is told in full in 
Cotton Mather's Magnalia. 

EAMES, CARLOS SIDNEY. 

(No. ggg. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; plumber; born at Wilmot, New Hampshire. 

Great-great-grandson of NATHANIEL EAMES 
(i 747-1820), of Framingham, Massachusetts; a mem- 
ber of a military company that marched from Fram- 
ingham to Concord and Cambridge, April 19, 1775, un- 
der Captain Jesse Fames, in the Lexington alarm. 



3^3 

EARLE, ARTHUR WINTHROP. 

(JVo. 822. Admitted Sept. 12, i8gj.) Of New Haven,. 
Connecticut; accountant; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of ABRAHAM LENT {i^s^-\^2^), 
who enlisted August i, 1776, as a private (but did the 
duty of clerk) for five months' service in the New York 
regiment of Colonel Jacobus Swarthout, which was 
attached to the brigade of General George Clinton. 
This regiment marched from Fishkill to King's Bridge, 
where it was stationed until the retreat of the army 
from Long Island, when it was ordered to White 
Plains, and afterwards to Peekskill and Fort Consti- 
tution, In January, 1777, he was appointed Ensign in 
the company of Captain Thomas Lee, which was at- 
tached to the expedition of General Heath at Fort In- 
dependence, near King's Bridge, where he served until 
the March following, when he resigned and was ap- 
pointed ist Lieutenant in the company of Captain 
Hendrick Wycoff, which was detached and placed un- 
der the command of Major Morice Place and assigned 
to the guard of Forts Montgomery and Constitution 
in the Highlands, from the ist of April to the last day 
of July, 1777. He was one of the officers who was 
assigned by Colonel Brinckerhoff as a guard to Gen- 
eral Gates on his way to take command of the North- 
ern army, and went with him to Albany. Afterwards, 
when the British advanced up the North River, he 
joined a detachment of Colonel Brinckerhoff's regi- 
ment of militia, under command of Major Swarthout, 
and marched to Peekskill to join the forces under 
General Putnam in preventing the enemy from land- 
ing, remaining with him until the British left the 
river and returned to New York in November. He 
assisted in building the fort at West Point in 1778, 
and served as a Lieutenant of militia for six weeks. 
In 1780 he was commissioned ist Lieutenant in Ralph 
M. Bruner's company in the regiment of militia in the 
county of Dutchess under Colonel Abraham Brincker- 



3H 

hoff, said commission being dated September 22, 1780, 
and signed by Governor George Clinton. In August, 
1786, he was appointed Major of a brigade of militia 
under Brigadier-General Jacobus Swarthout, his com- 
mission being signed by Gilbert Livingston. 

EASTERBROOK, NATHAN, Jr. 

(No. 70. Admitted April 20, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Herkimer, New 
York. 

Great-grandson of ABIAL EASTERBROOK (1753- 
-), of Warren, Rhode Island, a Revolutionary sol- 



dier who served as drummer in Captain Caleb Carr's 
company of Warren, Rhode Island. 

*EATON, DANIEL CADY. 

(No. 82 J. Admitted May 10, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; professor of botan)^ Yale University; 
born at Fort Gratiot, Michigan. Died June 29, 1895. 

Great-grandson of ABEL EA TON. {^See Year Book, 
i8Qj-4,p. 2J5, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 

EDDY, ARTHUR HERBERT. 

(No. y4p. Admitted Eeb. 22, i8pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at New Britain, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of PHIN EA S P ENEIELD, of 
Farmington, Connecticut (1756-1834), who was in serv- 
ice in the company of Captain John Langdon in 1776, 
and in a company commanded by Captain Peter Curtis 
in 1777 and 1779. He was a pensioner. 

EDGAR, GEORGE PARKER. 

(No. 5p2. Admitted Dec. 14, i8pi.) Of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts; insurance; born at New London, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS EDGAR (i 749-1823), 
a marine on the frigate " Trumbull," which, in 1781, 



315 

was captured off the Delaware capes by the " Iris " 
and the "General Monk," after a gallant resistance of 
one hour, during which she was completely disman- 
tled and lost five killed and eleven wounded. Edgar 
was captured and confined in Mill Prison, Plymouth, 
England. 

EDGERTON, FRANK CARLTON. 

(No. ^28. Admitted April 77, 18Q4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Williamantic, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSEPH FLOWER (1730- 
1793), of Wethersfield, Connecticut, a member in 1780 
of the Connecticut regiment commanded by Colonel 
Samuel B. Webb. 

EDMOND, JOHN DUCASSE. 

(No. 2^6. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Leavenworth, 
Kansas; merchant; born at Vergennes, Vermont. 

Great-grandson of JOHN DUCASSE, a Captain in 
the French army, who resigned and came to America 
with Lafayette. He received a commission as Major 
of artillery in the Continental army, and participated 
in the battles of Stillwater and Bemis Heights. He 
served until the close of the war, at which time he 
held a commission as Colonel of artillery. His family 
resided in the state of Connecticut. 

EDWARDS, FREDERICK BULKLEY. 

(No. 824. Admitted June 5, i8^j.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut ; druggist; born at Wethersfield, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN RILEY, of Weth- 
ersfield, Connecticut, who entered service January, 
1776, Was taken prisoner on an expedition to Long- 
Island, December 10, 1777; promoted to Captain July 
10, 1779; exchanged December 3, 1780; retired January 
I, ^83. 



EDWARDS, HENRY CHANDLER. 
(No. 804. Admitted April 18, 1893.) Of Cromwell, Con- 
necticut; brickmaker; born at Cromwell. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM SAGE. ySee Doolittle, 
Edgar Jared.^ 

EGGLESTON, PERCY COE. 

(No. logi. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New London. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL MINOR (1735- 
181 1), of Woodbury, Connecticut, who was appointed 
December 20, 1779, a member of a committee from 
Woodbury to see that families of enlisted men were 
cared for. He also at some period during the war 
served as a Sergeant. 

ELDRIDGE, JAMES WILLIAM. 

(No. 781. Admitted April 18, 18^3.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; real estate; born at Mount Carmel, Illinois. 

Great-grandson of Ensign CHARLES ELDRIDGE, 
wounded at Fort Griswold, September 6, 1781. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ELIJAH AVERY, of 
Groton, Connecticut, Captain in the 8th Connecticut 
militia, killed at Fort Griswold, September 6, 1781. 

ELIOT, WILLIAM RICHARDS. 

(No. 1046. Admitted Oct. 75, i8q^.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Boston, Massachusetts. 
Great-grandson of ANDREW ELIOT (\^s^-\^\\), 
of Mason, New Hampshire, who was a member of the 
company of Captain William Reed in the New Hamp- 
shire regiment, commanded by Colonel Baldwin, from 
September 26 to December, 1776. The regiment was 
at the battle of White Plains, October 28, 1776. 

ELLIS, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

(No. 223. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; builder; born at Glastonbury, Connecticut. 



317 

Grandson of LEMUEL KLNGSBURY (1752-1846), 
a private soldier from Enfield in the Lexington alarm, 
1775, and in 1776 a Cornet in the 5th regiment of light 
horse commanded by Colonel Elisha Sheldon. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH KLNGSBURY, a 
member of the Connecticut General Assembly from 
the town of Enfield from 1778 to 1785. 

Also, grandson of BENJAMLN ELLLS, of Norwich, 
a Revolutionary soldier. 

ELLIS, GEORGE. 

(No. 228. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; actuary of the Travelers Insurance Com- 
pany; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of LEMUEL KLNGSBURY. {^See 
Ellis ^ Benjamin Franklin^ 

ELLIS, RICHARD. 

(No. 82^. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Danbury, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at New York city. 

Great-great-grandson of OBADLALL FURDY {lui- 
1835), who enlisted as Lieutenant, July, 1776, in the 
company of Captain James Cronkite, Colonel Thomas 
Thomas' New York regiment; served six months; 
was engaged in the battle of White Plains, New York, 
October, 1776. 

ELMORE, SAMUEL EDWARD. 
(No. 8. Admitted April 2, i88p.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Connecticut River Banking 
Company; born at East Windsor, Connecticut. 

Grandson of SAMUEL ELMORE, who served as a 
private through five campaigns in the Revolutionary 
war. He was in the battle of Long Island, and a mem- 
ber of the army of General Gates at the time of the 
surrender of Burgoyne. He was at Horse Neck, May, 
1779, and at West Point in 1780, 



3i8 

ELTON, JAMES SAMUEL. 

(No. 826. Admitted Sept. 12, i8gj.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of CHARLES MERRIMAN (1762- 
1829), a Drum Major of the 6th and 4th regiments of 
the Connecticut line from 1777 to 1782. 

ELTON, JOHN PRINCE. 

(No. 827. Admitted Sept. 12, i8gj.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of CHARLES MERRLMAN. 
YSee Elton, James Samuel.'] 

ELY, CALVIN LUTHER. 
(No. iop2. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Branford, Con- 
necticut; dentist; born at Cheshire, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JACOB ELY (1748-1836), of Lyme, 
Connecticut, who was at the battle of Bunker Hill, 
and enlisted in June, 1775, and served six months and 
fifteen days as private in the company of Captain 
Coit, under Colonel Parsons. He again enlisted in 
June, 1776, and served five months and twenty-one 
days as Sergeant in the company of Captain Bing- 
ham, under Colonel Selden. He was a pensioner. 

*ELY, RICHARD SHELDON. 

(No. dpo. Admitted May 16, i8g2.) Of Avon, Connecti- 
cut; born at Hartford, Connecticut. Died March — , 
1894. 

Grandson of ROBERT DAVLS. {^See Year Book, 
i8p3-4,pp. 238,430.] 

ELY, WILLIAM DAVIS. 

(No. 6pi. Admitted May 16, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford. 

Grandson of ROBERT £>AVLS,of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts (1746-1798), who was one of the "Boston Tea 



319 

Party," which threw overboard the tea from the 
British vessels in Boston harbor. He was an officer 
in Craft's artillery regiment when the fleet of the 
enemy was expelled from Boston harbor, and was 
in active service for more than two years. At or after 
the close of the war he had the rank of Major. 

ELY, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. S56. Admitted Sept. zj, iSpi.) Of NewHaven, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of THOMAS YOUNG 
SEYMOUR, of Hartford (T757-1811), who was ap- 
pointed Lieutenant in Colonel Elisha Sheldon's Light 
Dragoons, January 10, 1777. He was made Captain in 
October of the same year, and his company was de- 
tached to serve under General Gates in the campaign 
against Burgoyne. In Trumbull's painting of "The 
Surrender of Burgoyne," Captain Seymour, mounted, 
is a conspicuous figure. After the surrender he was 
detached to escort General Burgoyne to Boston. In 
every town in which the part}^ halted crowds came to 
look at the distinguished captive, and in some in- 
stances Captain Seymour found it difficult to protect 
him from actual violence. After reaching Boston, 
General Burgoyne presented Captain Seymour with a 
saddle and a pair of silver-mounted cavalry pistols as 
token of his appreciation of the manner in which that 
officer had performed his delicate duty. Captain Sey- 
mour was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 

ENGLISH, BENJAMIN RICE. 

(No. go2. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; real estate agent; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of ISAAC DOOLITTLE, of 
New Haven, Connecticut (i 722-1800), a member of the 
New Haven committee of correspondence, 1774; also 
a member of a committee to collect funds for the 
relief of the inhabitants of Boston; was also a mem 



320 

ber of a committee to collect arms and ammunition 
for the use of the colony of Connecticut in carrying 
on the Revolutionary war. 

EVERITT, EDWIN BROWNSON. 

(No. 782. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Watertown, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ABNER EVERITT, of Bethlehem and 
Warren, Connecticut (1760-1852), who in the summer 
of 1778 served in the company of Captain Enos Haw- 
ley in a regiment commanded by Colonel Increase 
Moseley, and in the fall of the same year in the com- 
pany of Captain Hinman, and in 1779 i^^ the company 
of Captain Hine, in a regiment commanded by Colonel 
Canfield. 

FARNHAM, ELIAS BUSHNELL. 

(No. 83. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; coal dealer; born at Clinton, Connecticut. 

Great'grandson of IIIEL FARNHAM. 

FARNSWORTH, C. BILLINGS. 

(No. loy. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; physician. 

Grandson of AMOS FARNSWORTH, of Groton, 
Massachusetts (i 754-1847), who fought behind the 
breastworks at Bunker Hill until they were captured 
by the British forces; in the retreat his right arm was 
shattered by a ball. In 1776 he was Ensign in Captain 
vShattuck's company at Ticonderoga. The next winter 
he was in New Jersey. In 1780 he helped to organize 
the artillery company of Groton, with which he re- 
mained as Lieutenant, Captain and Major until 1798. 

FARNSWORTH, FREDERICK. 

(No. 128. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 



321 

Grandson of AMOS FARNSWORTH. ^See Farns- 
ivorth^ C. B.I 

PARREN, MERRITT AUGUSTUS. 

fJVo. 444. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; theological student; born at East Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of NATHAN BURNHAM, 

2d, of Ashford, Connecticut (1760 ), a private in 

Captain Eliphalet Holmes' company, of the ist regi- 
ment, Connecticut line. 



FARREN, ROSWELL BRADLEY. 

(No. 445. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at East Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN BURNHAM, 2d. 
ySee Far r en, Merritt A.'] 

FARREN, WILLIS HENRY. 

(No. 44J. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN BURN HAM, 2d. 

ySee Far r en, Merritt A.] 

FAXON, (MRS.) NELLIE ADELLE WHITE. 

(No. 828. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Wife of Walter 
CoUyer Faxon, of Hartford, Connecticut; born at 
Somers, Connecticut. 

Great-great-granddaughter of DAVID GUSHING 
(1727-1800), who marched from Hingham, Massachu- 
setts, as 4th Lieutenant in Captain John Loring's com- 
pany, in the Lexington alarm, served thirteen days; 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Colonel of the Massachu- 
setts militia, 2d Suffolk County regiment, February 7, 



322 

1776; apiDointed Colonel in the 2d regiment in Suffolk 
County, Massachusetts, October 6, 1778. 

Also, great-granddaughter of ABEL GUSHING 

(1763 ), who enlisted January, 1781, for three 

years as Corporal in Captain Seth Bannister's* com- 
pany, Colonel William Shepherd's Massachusetts reg- 
iment. 

Also, great-granddaughter of STEPHEN PEASE 
(1755-1838), who enlisted for three years in the 3d 
regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel 
Samuel Wyllys. He participated in the battle of 
Stillwater. 

FELT, LEVI LINCOLN. 

(No. 38. Admitted April 18, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance clerk; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH FELT (1760 ), of 

West Springfield, Massachusetts, a private soldier in 
Captain John Morgan's company in Colonel David 
Leonard's regiment in service at Ticonderoga, 1778; 
also in Captain Phineas Stebbins' company in Colonel 
Nathan Sparhawk's regiment, twenty days from Sep- 
tember 28 in the same year. He was a pensioner. 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN LINCOLN 
(1751-1840), a Revolutionary soldier from Oakham, 
Massachusetts, who served from August, 1778, to Feb- 
ruary, 1779, i^ the Rhode Island campaign under 
General John Sullivan. 

Also, great-great-grandson of BEN JAMIN MILES, 
of Rutland, Massachusetts (1724 ), member of Cap- 
tain Thomas Eustis' company of Minute-men, which 
marched for Cambridge, April 19, 1775. 

Also, great-great grandson of SHARON PEASE, of 

Enfield, Connecticut (1746 ), a member of Captain 

Loomis' company, in Major Backus' regiment of Light 
Horse, ordered to the army near New York, 1776. Also 
a member of a detachment in the 3d troop in the 4th 



regiment of Light Horse, which served as an escort to 
the convention troops (prisoners of Burgoyne's army) 
passing through Connecticut, November, 1778. 

FENN, JOHN ROBERTS. 

(No. 26. Admitted April 2, 1889.) O^ West Hartford, 
Connecticut; furniture; born at West Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of LEMUEL ROBERTS, of 
Simsbury, Connecticut, Captain of a company of militia 
which marched for Boston in the Lexington alarm~ in 
April, 1775. He was also Captain of a company sta- 
tioned in New York city from August 24 to September 
7, 1776. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOTHAM CURTLSS, 
of Plymouth, Connecticut, a Captain in a regiment of 
Connecticut militia, which served under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Baldwin at Fishkill, New York, in October, 
1777; who was also Captain of a company which 
marched to New Haven to repel an attack of the 
enemy, in July, 1779. 

FENN, LINUS TRYON. 

(No. 2y. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of West Hartford, 
Connecticut; dealer in and manufacturer of furniture; 
born at Plymouth, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JO THAM CUR TLSS, \^See Fenn, 
John Roberts 7[ 

FENTON, CHARLES. 

(No. p^y. Admitted Feb. 11, i8g^.) Of Willimantic, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Crown Point, New 
York. 

Great-grandson of LSAAC BARROWS {1^2^ ), 

of Mansfield, Connecticut, who served in the Lexing- 
ton alarm, and also as a private in the 8th regiment, 
Connecticut line, under Colonel Jedediah Huntington, 
from July 28 to December 18, 1775. 



3^4 

FERRY, EDWIN STERLING. 

(No. i04y. Admitted Dec. i6, iSpS-) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of AZARIAH WHITTLE- 
SEY. S^See Bull, William E^^ 

FIELD, BURR KELLOGG. 

(No. g^8. Admitted Feb. ii, i8g^.) Of Berlin, Connecti- 
cut; vice-president of Berlin Iron Bridge company; 
born at Auburn, Indiana. 

Great-grandson of JOSHUA DANFORTH (1759- 
1837), of Massachusetts, who on the outbreak of the 
war, left college at the age of fifteen and entered the 
army as clerk in the company of his father, Jonathan 
Danforth, who commanded a battalion at the battle of 
Bennington. He received a commission as Ensign at 
the age of sixteen, was promoted to ist Lieutenant in 
1778, and appointed paymaster, with the rank of Cap- 
tain, in 3781. His first active service was at Roxbury, 
Massachusetts, when the British were bombarding 
that place. He was afterwards present at Ticonder- 
oga, the surrender of Burgoyne, and Valley Forge. 
October i, 1780, he attended a brigade court martial 
as judge-advocate; commanded a post near Tappan 
Bay in 1781, and on the disbanding of the army in 
1783 was continued in the service until the next year 
to settle accounts with the soldiers. 

FIELD, FREDERICK WILLIAM. 

(No. 446. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Madison, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of LUKE FIELD of Madison, Con- 
necticut (1753-1836), a private in Captain Andrew 
Ward's company in the ist Connecticut regiment, 
1775; who also served in Captain Hand's company of 
Colonel Talcott's regiment, 1776. 



325 

FILER, ANSON PRIEST. 

(No. 6^1. Admitted March 26, 18^2,) Of Warehouse 
Point, Connecticut; accountant; born at East Windsor, 
Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSEPH LORD (1758- 
1833), a private soldier in Captain Erastus Wolcott's 
East Windsor company, 1776. 



v'^A^^i^^ 




Also, great-great-grandson of JEREMIAM LORD 
(1755-1812), of East Windsor, Connecticut, who in 1775 
was a member of Captain Hezekiah Parsons' company 
in the 4th Connecticut regiment commanded by Colo- 
nel Benjamin Hinman. This company served at the 
siege of Boston. In 1776 he was a Sergeant under 
the same Captain in the regiment of Colonel Comfort 
Sage, the 3d battalion, Wadsworth's brigade. This 
regiment participated in the engagements on Long- 
Island, in New York city, and at White Plains. 

Also, great-great-grandson of HEZEKLAH IVADS- 
JVOR TH (ij 24-1810) , of Farmington, Connecticut, who 
with others signed an agreement September 3, 1774, 
to be in readiness and duly equipped with arms and 
ammunition for the relief of the besieged and dis- 
tressed brethren at Boston. He also rendered other 
service as a soldier. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ROGER ELLER of 
Windsor, Connecticut (1743-1778), a member of Colo- 
nel Jedediah Huntington's regiment, 17th Continental, 
in 1776. He was in the engagement on Long Island 
and lost a leg. 

PISH, NATHAN SANDS. 

(JVo. S2p. Admitted Eeb. 12^ 18Q4.) Of Groton, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Groton. 



326 

Great-great-grandson of BEN AD AM GALLUP. 
\^See Dent son, Frederic ?\ 

FITCH, CHARLES WELLINGTON. 

(No. 6g2. Admitted Oct. i8, i8g2.) Of New York city; 
physician and surgeon; born at Centerville, Connecti- 
cut. 
Great-great-grandson of TLTUS MOSS of Walling- 

ford, Connecticut (1738 ), Lieutenant in the 2d 

company of the 7th Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Charles Webb in 1775. The com- 
panies of this regiment were stationed at various 
points on the Sound during the summer, and in Sep- 
tember, on requisition from Washington, the regiment 
was ordered to the Boston camps. 

FITTvS, HENRY EBEN. 

(No. 108. Ad?nitted Dec. 12, 1889.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper and cashier; born at Hartford. 
Great-grandson of THOMAS WYLLLS, a private 
soldier who marched from Hartford for the relief of 
Boston in the Lexington alarm. 

FOOTE, EDWARD BLISS. 

(No. 6pj. Admitted Oct. 18, i8q2.) Of Larchmont, New 
York; physician; born at Cleveland, Ohio. 

Great-grandson of JOHN FOOTE, of Simsbury, 
Connecticut (1729-1813), a Sergeant in a company from 
Simsbury which turned out in the Lexington alarm. 
He was generally spoken of as " Captain Foote." 

FOOTE, ELLSWORTH IRVING. 

(No. 422. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the New Haven Water com- 
pany; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of J AM E S R FY N O L D S 
1732-1818), a Lieutenant in the 2d company, Colonel 
Swift's battalion, in service July-November, 1776. 



327 

FORBES, OLIVER TYLER. 
(No. 6g4. Admitted Oct. i^, i8g2.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; accountant; born at New York city. 

Great-great-grandson of AMOS LESTER, of Gro- 
ton, Connecticut (1728-1808), wounded in the defense 
of Fort Griswold in 1781. 

FORD, GEORGE HARE. 

(No. ^ly. Admitted June 75, i8qi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Milford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL CLARK, of Milford 
(1751-1824). He was a member of Captain Charles 
Pond's company in the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, 
commanded by Colonels William Douglas and Return 
Jonathan Meigs, 1777-80. 

FORD, WILLIAM ELBERT. 

(No. sSo. Admitted Oct. 14, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of Captain STEPHEN EORD, of 
Hamden, Connecticut (i 749-1843), a Revolutionary 
soldier. 

^FOSTER, FREDERICK ROSE, Jr. 

(No. 3p. Admitted April 18, i88p.J Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut. Died January 22, 1891. 

Great-great-grandson of HACHALIAH FOSTER. 
(See Year Book, i8gi, pp. 104, ipy.) 

FOWLER AMOS TERTIUS. 

(No. 410. Admitted Oct. 21, i8po.) Of Willimantic, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Lebanon, Connecticut. 

Grandson of AMOS FOWLER, of Lebanon, Con- 
necticut (1758-1837), who served several tours of duty, 
beginning in 1776 and concluding in 1781. He partic- 
ipated in the engagements at Quaker and Butts Hills, 
Rhode Island. His last service was as Corporal at 
New London. He was a pensioner. 



328 

FOWLER, (MRS.) CARRIE BELLE. 

(No. 830. Admitted May 16, i8q2.) Wife of Oswin Hart 
Doolittle Fowler, of Wallingford, Connecticut; born 
at Wallingford. 

Great-great-granddaughter of THADDEUS COOK, 
of Wallingford (1728-1800), who entered the service 
as Major in Colonel Andrew Ward's Connecticut regi- 
ment, May 14, 1776; joined Washington's army with 
his regiment, August, 1776; was first stationed at Fort 
Lee; marched to White Plains and New Jersey; par- 
ticipated in the battles of Trenton and Princeton; 
served through the year; was promoted Colonel of 
loth regiment militia; was also Colonel of the 2d bat- 
talion, which the General Assembly in November, 1776, 
voted to raise to join the Continental army; served 
under General Wooster in spring of 1777; at Danbury 
alarm, April, 1777; reinforced General Gates in Bur- 
goyne's campaign, summer of 1777; was in the battles 
of Stillwater, September 19 and October 7, 1777, his 
regiment being in General Poor's Continental brigade 
in Arnold's division. Cook's and Latimer's regiments 
lost more men than any other two regiments on the 
field. On their dismissal after Burgoyne's surrender, 
General Gates spoke of them as "two excellent regi- 
ments from Connecticut." Colonel Cook afterwards 
served in the loth regiment militia. 

FOWLER, FRANK GRIDLEY. 

(JVo. 1048. Admitted Dec. 16, i8g^.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; court stenographer; born at Wheatland, 
Michigan. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL KIRTLAND (1745- 
1824), of Saybrook, Connecticut, who was a Sergeant 
in the company of Captain John Ely, in the 6th Con- 
necticut regiment, commanded by Colonel Parsons, 
from May 8 to December 18, 1775. His name also 
appears as Ensign on the muster roll of the company 



329 

of Captain Martin Kirtland, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Erastus Wolcott, located at New 
London February 28, 1777. 

FOWLER, FRANK SEAMON. 

(No. 411. Admitted Oct. 21^ i8go.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Lebanon, Connecticut. 
Great-grandson of AMOS FOWLER. \^See Fowler^ 
Amos Tertius.^ 

FOWLER, HENRY LEWIS. 

(No. II 50. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; draughtsman; born at Guilford, Connecticut. 

Grandson of REUBEN FOWLER (1760-1832), a 
pensioner in 1832. 

Also, great-grandson of ELLAS WLLLARD (1759- 
1823), who was a private in the 6th regiment, Connecti- 
cut line; also in Captain Hand's company, Colonel 
Talcott's regiment. 

FOWLER, HERBERT GREENE. 

(No. pjfP' Admitted Feb. 11, i8p^.) Of New Britain, Con- 
necticut; broker; born at Stoneham, Massachusetts. 

Great-great-grandson oiNATLLANLEL COW DREY 
(1759-1841), of Reading, Massachusetts, who entered 
the service at Bunker Hill, and in 1779 served on 
board the privateer "Hunter" in an expedition to 
Penobscot, and also on the ship "Jack," which cap- 
tured and brought home two prizes. While serving 
at West Point in 1780, in Colonel Tupper's regiment, 
under Captain Francis, he kept a diary, and under 
date of September 25, he writes: " General Arnold this 
day departed to the enemy, and the enemy's Adjutant- 
General was taken prisoner." 

FOWLER, OSWIN HART DOOLITTLE. 

(No. yso. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^3.) Of Wallingford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at North Haven, Connecticut. 



330 

Great-grandson of THEOPHILUS FOWLER, of 
Guilford, Connecticut (1752-1829), a private soldier in 
Captain Daniel Hand's company in 1776. It is said 
that he also served at Ticonderoga. He again enlisted 
in May, 1776, and served five months as a private in 
the company of Captain Stephen Hall in the regiment 
of Colonel Heman Smith, and in August, 1779, he 
again enlisted and served two months in coast-guard 
duty under Captain Vail. He was a pensioner. 

Also, great-grandson of JONATHAN DAYTON 
Jr., of North Haven, Connecticut (1756-1835), a mem- 
ber of Captain The Rev. Benjamin Trumbull's com- 
pany, raised in 1777 to go on detached service to Rye, 
New York. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JON A THAN DA Y- 
TON. [See Beach, Henry Dayton.'] 

Also, great-grandson of JOEL DOOLLTTLE, of 
Wallingford, Connecticut (1761-1825), a private soldier 
in a company commanded by Captain Abraham Stan- 
ley, Jr., in service at Horse Neck, 1779. 

Also, great-great-grandson of NA THANLEL HAR T, 
of Wallingford, Connecticut (1729-1809). In 1775 ap- 
pointed one of the committee of inspection. 

Also, great-great-grandson oiENOS BR00KS{itzS- 

), of Cheshire, who was a Corporal in the company 

of Captain Street Hall in the 7th regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Charles Webb, from July 12 to 
December 19, 1775, and served around Boston. 

FOWLER, REUBEN LEWES. 

(No. 831. Admitted May 16, i8g2.) Of Guilford, Con- 
necticut; mariner; born at Guilford. 

Son of REUBEN FOWLER. [See Fowler, Henry 
Lewis. ] 

Also, grandson of ELLAS WLLLARD. [See Fowler, 
Henry Lewis.] 



33^ 

FOX, CHARLES JAMES. 

(JVo. looo. Admitted May lo, iSps-) Of Willim antic, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Wethersfield, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELI/AH HUNTINGTON 
(1734-1814), of Norwich, Connecticut, who served at 
New London in Captain Wales' company, in the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Jeremiah Mason, from 
September 13 until October 17, 1776. 

FOX, SIMEON JOSEPH. 

(No. lopj. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Agawam, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of ABRAHAM FOX (1748 ), of 

Hebron, Connecticut, who was a member of the com- 
pany of Captain Elizur Hubbard, which marched from 
Glastonbury to the relief of Boston in the Lexington 
alarm. He probably rendered other service later. 

FRANKLIN, WILLIAM BUEL. 

(No. 283. , Admitted March 2p, i8qo.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; late Major-General in the United States 
army; member of the Society of the Cincinnati; Grand 
Officier de la Legion d'Honneur ; president of the board 
of managers of the National Home for Disabled Sol- 
diers; born at York, Pennsylvania. 

Great-grandson of JONAS SIMONDS, who served 
during the war of the Revolution as Captain of Penn- 
sylvania artillery. The company he commanded was 
raised in Philadelphia and annexed to Colonel Lamb's 
regiment, and by general orders January i, 1781, 
annexed to the Pennsylvania regiment of artillery. 

FRANCIS, WILLIAM MOORHOUSE. 

(No. i04p. Admitted Dec. id, i8ps.J Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; steam boiler inspector; born at Hartford. 



Great-great-grandson of JUSTUS FRANCIS (1762- 
1819), of Wethersfield, Connecticut, who enlisted in 
1778 in the company of Captain Asa Bray, in the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Roger Eno; but before 
rendering active service, was detailed to perform the 
duties of a blacksmith in the shops at Hartford. Term 
of service, about two years. His widow drew a pen- 
sion. 

FRISBIE, EDWARD LAURENS, Jr. 

(No. 10Q4. Admitted March 2j, i8q6.) Of Waterbury, 
. Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of REUBEN FRISBIE (1747- 
1824), of Waterbury, Connecticut, who enlisted in 1776 
and served through the war under Captains Samuel 
Barker, Ten Eyck and Stephen Potter. In 1777 he 
was in the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, commanded 
by Colonel Douglas, and afterwards by Colonel Meigs. 
In 1781 the 6th regiment was merged, in the second 
formation, into the 4th regiment, and upon the third 
formation part of the 4th regiment was merged in the 
2d regiment, and so continued until mustered out in 
1783. He was a pensioner. 

FROST, CHARLES WARREN SELAH. 

(No. log^. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of ABRAHAM BROOKER. 
\^See Brooker, Charles F.^ 

Also, great -great -great -grandson of SAMUEL 
FROST (i 704-1800), of Waterbury, Connecticut, who 
served in the loth militia regiment in the company 
commanded by Lieutenant Isaac Benham, under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Baldwin, which responded to the 
call of Washington in August, 1776, for service around 
New York. 



333 

FROST, RUSSELL. 

(No. 382. Admitted Oct. 21, i8go.) Of South Norwalk, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Delhi, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN MEAD (1725-1790), 
in May, 1775, Major of militia and representative in 
the General Assembly for the town of Greenwich. In 
the same year he was made Lieutenant-Colonel, and 
in March, 1776, he was ordered to New York in com- 
mand of the 9th regiment. He was made Colonel in 
1778, and Brigadier-General in 1781. He was a repre- 
sentative in the General Assembly before, during, and 
after the Revolutionary war. 

FULTON, WILLIAM EDWARDS. 

(No. iog6. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Great-grandson of OLIVER EDWARDS {itsS-^^^9)^ 
of Northampton, Massachusetts, who served for eight 
days from April 20, 1775, ^pon the Lexington alarm, 
in the company of Captain Jonathan Allen, under 
Colonel Pomeroy. Upon being mustered out April 27, 
1775, he enlisted in the company of Captain Jonathan 
Allen under Colonel John Fellows, and served until 
August 1, 1775; and on September 9, 1775, went on the 
expedition to Quebec under the same command. 

GALLUP, LOREN ABORN. 

(No. 833. Admitted Oct. 17, 18^3.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Groton, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSEPH GALLUP (1725- 
1778), Captain of a company in the 8th regiment, Con- 
necticut militia, in service at New York, 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH GALLUP, Jr., a 
private in Captain Abel Spicer's company, 6th Con- 
necticut regiment, commanded by Colonel Samuel 
23 



334 

Holden Parsons, 1775; in service seven months; in the 
summer of 1776 he served four months in the com- 
pany commanded by his father in service at New 
York. 

GARDINER, CURTIS CRANE. 

(No. jjy. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; insurance; born at Eaton, New York. 

Great-grandson of CURTIS CRANE, of Wethers- 
field, Connecticut (1745-1828), who enlisted for the 
war, February 28, 1778, in Captain Thomas Wooster's 
company in the Connecticut regiment commanded by 
Colonel S. B. Webb. He was made Corporal, June i, 
1781. This regiment participated in the battle at 
Quaker Hill, August 29, 1778, and it remained in 
Rhode Island during the following winter. In the fall 
of 1779 it marched to winter quarters at Morristown. 
It was present at the battle of Springfield, New Jer- 
sey, June 23, 1780. 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM GARDINER, 
of Stonington, Connecticut (1741-1800), a private sol- 
dier in the 8th company of the 2d Connecticut reg- 
iment, commanded by General Spencer, raised on the 
first call for troops, April-May, 1775. Detachments of 
officers and men of this regiment were engaged in 
the battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, and in Arnold's 
Quebec expedition, September to December, 1775. 

GARDINER, FREDERIC. 

(No. iop7. Admitted Dec. 16, i8qS-) Of Pomfret, Con 
necticut; clergyman; born at Gardiner, Maine. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM TUDOR (1750-1819), 
of Boston, Massachusetts, who was elected judge- 
advocate of the Continental army, July 29, 1775, was 
attached to the staff of General Washington, and 
served until April 9, 1778. From January, 1777, until 



335 

April, 1778, he was Lieutenant-Colonel of Henley's 
additional Continental regiment. He was the first 
vice-president of the Society of the Cincinnati. 

GARDNER, ROBERT SYLVANUS. 

(No. 8j4. Adinitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Derby, Con- 
necticut; jeweler and stationer; born at East Hamp- 
ton, New York. 

Great-great -great-grandson of DA VID MULFORD 
(1772-1778), who, in 1774, was a member of the com- 
mittee of correspondence of South Haven, Long Is- 
land; in 1775, ^ muster master of the troops to be 
raised in Suffolk county. New York; in 1776, Colonel 
of the 2d regiment in Suffolk county. 

Also, great-great-grandson of MATHEW MUL- 
FORD ( 1 756-1 845), a member of Captain Ezekiel Mul- 
ford's company in Colonel Josiah Smith's regiment, 
1776. 

GATES, (MRS.) ELIZABETH MARGARET LAR- 
RABEE. 

(No. y^i. Admitted Feb. 22^ iSgj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at East Hartford, Connecticut. 

Granddaughter of JONATHAN LARRABEE, of 

Scarborough and Durham, Maine (1748 ), who, in 

1775, was a member of a Massachusetts company com- 
manded by Captain Strout, and in 1776 a member of a 
Massachusetts company commanded by Captain Lar- 
rabee, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Fogg. 
He was a pensioner. 

Also, great-granddaughter of THOMAS WILLING- 
TON^ of Watertown, Massachusetts (i 735-1 81 8), who 
turned out in Captain Samuel Barnard's company in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Thomas Gard- 
ner, in the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He was 
commissioned Lieutenant in May, 1775, i^ Colonel 
Jonathan Brewer's regiment, the 7th Continental, and 



was in the battle of Bunker Hill. October i, 1776, he 
was commissioned Captain in Colonel Asa Whitcomb's 
battalion, and re-engaged November 14, 1776, as Cap- 
tain in Wigglesworth's battalion. He was in service 
at Ticonderoga in November of that year. He also 
served as Captain in Colonel Smith's regiment from 
January, 1777, to April, 1779. 




GAY, ERASTUS. 
(No, II. Admitted April 2^ 188^.) Of Farmington, Con- 
necticut; merchant and appraiser for savings bank; 
born at Farmington. 

Great-grandson of FISHER GA V, of Farmington, 
Connecticut (1733-1776). He was placed on the town 
committees of correspondence, vigilance and supplies, 
in 1774. January 23, 1776, he was commissioned Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel of the regiment commanded by Colo- 
nel Wolcott, which went to Boston toward the end of 
January. On the 4th of March, 1776, he was ordered 
with his regiment to act as a part of a covering party 
to the men detached to fortify Dorchester Heights. 
The success of this movement led to the evacuation 
of Boston, and the regiment formed a part of the 
force which took possession of the city. He was com- 
missioned June 20, 1776, Colonel of the 2d battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade, raised to reinforce Washington 
at New York. He died there August 22, 1776, just be- 
fore the battle of Long Island. On his sword, which 
is still preserved, are engraved the words, " Freedom 
or Death." 



337 

GAY, FRANK BUTLER. 

(No. 25. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; librarian of the Watkinson Library; born at 
East Granby, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of RICHARD GAY (1750-1836), a 
volunteer in the Lexington alarm, and again a volun- 
teer in July, 1775, under Captain Elihu Humphrey, 
when he went to Roxbury, Massachusetts. In Octo- 
ber, 1776, and for two months, he was at Westchester 
and other places on the Hudson, under Lieutenant 
Seymour. He also served at other times and places. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH PEASE 
(1728-1794), who turned out in the Lexington alarm, 
from Suffield, in April, 1775, and in June of the same 
year joined the army at Roxbury. In the winter fol- 
lowing he was a paymaster of Connecticut troops. 

Also, great-grandson of ROSWELL SKINNER 
(1754-1831), of East Windsor, Connecticut, a private in 
Captain Amasa Loomis' company, which marched 
from East Windsor, for the relief of Boston, in the 
Lexington alarm. 

*GEER, ERASTUS. 
(No. ^02. Admitted May 28, i8gi.) Of Lebanon, Con- 
necticut; born at Lebanon. Died February, 1896. 

Grandson of ISAAC GALLUP. 

Also, great-grandson of BEN AD AM GALLUP. 
\See Year Book, i8pj~4, p. 2^2, and obituary, Year Book, 

GEER, FRANCES ARDELIA. 
(No. ^16. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Lebanon, Con- 
necticut; born at Ledyard, Connecticut. 

Granddaughter of JONAH WITTER (1758-1847), 
who enlisted in the month of December, 1776, and 
served three months as a private in Captain William 
Smith's company, Colonel John Douglas' Connecticut 



338 

regiment. In the spring of 1777, he again enlisted in 
Captain Smith's company, Colonel Ely's regiment, and 
served about eight months. He was a pensioner. 

GEER, WILLIAM HAMILTON. 

(No. 1 138. Ad^nitted April 21^ i8q6.) Of Lebanon, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Lebanon. 

Great-grandson oil S A AC GALLUP, of Groton, Con- 
necticut (1743-1814), Lieutenant of the loth company, 
in the 6th Connecticut regiment, commanded by Colo- 
nel Samuel H. Parsons, 1775. When the regiment 
was reorganized, in 1776, as the loth Continental, he 
was appointed to the command of a company in it. 
After the siege of Boston the regiment marched un- 
der Washington to New York, was engaged in the 
battle of Long Island, and present with the army at 
White Plains, October 28, 1776. 

Also, great-great-grandson of BENADAM GAL- 
LUP. [See Denisoit, Frederic.^ 

GEORGE, JAMES HERBERT. 

(No. p6o. Admitted Feb. 22., i8p6.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; music teacher; born at Newbury, Vermont. 

Great-grandson of General JACOB BAYLEY (1728- 
1815), of Newbury, Vermont, who, on the breaking out 
of the war, was commissioned a Colonel by the state 
of New York. Later he was appointed by General 
Washington Commissary-General of the northern 
department, then known as "Upper Coos." His cor- 
respondence with Generals Greene and Washington 
shows that he was held in high esteem by those 
officers. 

GETMAN, CHARLES HENRY. 

(No. 83s. Admitted Feb. 12, 1804.) Of Stamford, Con- 
necticut; lumber merchant; born at Troy, New York. 



339 

Great-grandson of GEORGE GETMAN, a private 
soldier in Colonel Jacob Klock's regiment, Tryon 
County, New York, militia; in active service. 

Also, a great-grandson of FREDERICK EMPIE, a 
private soldier in Colonel Jacob Klock's regiment, 
Tryon County, New York, militia. 

GILBERT, CHARLES EDWIN. 

(No. 487, Admitted May 4, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; cashier insurance company; born at Walling- 
ford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of HENRY CHAMPION, Sr., 
of Colchester, Connecticut (1723-1797), appointed in 
1775 Commissary "to supply all necessary stores and 
provisions for the troops now to be raised for the de- 
fense of the colony," and in the same year promoted 
from Lieutenant-Colonel of the 12th regiment to Colo- 
nel of the 25th regiment. He served under General 
Saltonstall in the campaign around New York. In 

1777 he was appointed General-Commissary, and in 

1778 sole purchasing Commissary for the eastern de- 
partment. 



-^^. 



-€^^7^?^^ 



^l>^9~ri^^'2^„C^er'>^ 



GILBERT, TIMOTHY. 

(No. S03. Admitted May 28, i8gi.) Of Rocky Hill, 
Connecticut; farmer; born at Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. 

Grandson of BENJAMIN GILBERT, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut (i 760-1846), a private soldier, en- 
listed April 27, 1777, in the company of Captain Elijah 
Blackman, in the Continental regiment commanded 
by Colonel Henry Sherburne. This regiment partici- 
pated in the battle of Quaker Hill, in Rhode Island, 
in 1778, and was commended for its conduct. 



340 

GILDERSLEEVE, ALFRED. 

(No. 836. Admitted Sept. 12, iSpj.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; shipbuilder; born at Portland. 

Great-great-grandson of AMOS RANSOM (1760- 
1843), who enlisted about June, 1776, for six months, in 
the command of Colonel Erastus Wolcott, marched to 
and was stationed at New London, Connecticut. He 
served for three months in 1777 in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Dyer Throop, also at New London, 
Connecticut. 

GILLETT, ALBERT BROWN. 

(No. 2^3 . Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Ellington, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN GILLETT, a fifer in 
a company from the town of Simsbury in the Lexing- 
ton alarm. Also, fifer in Captain Forward's company 
of the i8th Connecticut militia at New York from 
August 24 to September 25, 1776; and in 1777 a fifer in 
the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, of which he was 
made Fife-Major in June, 1779. 

^GILLETTE, (MRS.) ELIZABETH DAGGETT 
HOOKER. 

(No. 6p6. Admitted Sept. ij, iSp2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Farmington, Connecticut. Died De- 
cember 16, 1893. 

Granddaughter of NO AD I AH HOOKER. ^See 
Year Book, 1893-4, pp. 2SS, 4SS-] 

OILMAN, DANIEL COIT. 

(No. 4/S' Admitted April 21, i8pi.) Of Baltimore, 
Maryland; President of the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of EPHRAIM BILL (17 19 ), 

who superintended the building of a battery at Water- 
man's Point, and rendered other service. 



341 

Also, great-grandson of Captain JO SI AH GILMAN, 
who was in the service of the state of New Hampshire 
for a long time in the examination and certification 
of military accounts, as a member of the Committee 
on Claims. 

Also, great-great-grandson of Captain SAMUEL 
GILMAN, who volunteered under Colonel John Lang- 
don, and joined the army of General Gates, October, 
1777. 

GLADDING, CHARLES FREDERICK. 
(JVo. 442 . Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Providence, Rhode 
Island. 

Grandson of NATHANIEL GLADDING, a Cap- 
tain-Lieutenant in a train of artillery raised by the 
state of Rhode Island in 1776-77. 

GLADWIN, JOSEPH CHURCHILL. 
(No. 6qs. Admitted Sept. ij, i8q2.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; marine draftsman; born at Portland. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH CHURCHILL. {^See 
Bulkley, Erastus Brainerd.^ 

GLAZIER, CHARLES MATHER. 

(No. 476. Admitted April 21, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of SILAS GLAZIER. ^See 
Bates, Sarah Glazier.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of SELAH NORTON 
(1745-1822), of East Hartford, Connecticut, Captain in 
the 4th regiment of Connecticut Light Horse. 

Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL SAFFORD 
(1737-1813), Major of a battalion of Green Mountain 
Boys, and a participant in the battles of Hubbardton 
and Bennington. He was afterwards a Lieutenant- 
Colonel in the Revolutionary army, an^i later a Gen- 
eral in the militia. 



342 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH BURN- 
HAM (1752-1839), of Ashford, Connect! cnt, who 
served for ten days in the Windham company in 
the Lexington alarm. In 1775 ^^ served eight 
months as Sergeant in the company of Captain 
Daniel Lyons, in the 8th Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington. In Octo- 
ber, 1777, he served six weeks as Sergeant in the com- 
pany commanded by Captain Abner Robinson, in the 
regiment commanded by Colonel McLellan. In May, 
1778, he was appointed Ensign of the 5th company of 
the alarm list in the 5th regiment of Connecticut militia. 
In October, 1781, he served three month as a Lieutenant 
in the company of Captain Robbins, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel McLellan. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

GLAZIER, FRANK DWIGHT. 

(No. ^18 . Admitted June 15, iSpi.) Of South Glaston- 
bury, Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Glaston- 
bury, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SILAS GLAZIER. \^See 
Bates, Mrs. Sarah Glazier. '\ 

Also, great-grandson of ABRAHAM WHEADON. 
l^See Chapin., Mary A dell a Glazier.^ 

Also, great-grandson of REUBEN SKINNER. [See 
Chapin, Mary Adella Glazier.'] 

GLAZIER, DANIEL JOHNSON. 

(No. looi. Admitted May 10, iSg^.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the Schuyler Electric Com- 
pany; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of SILAS GLAZIER. [See 
Bates ^ Mrs. Sarah Glazier?^ 

GLAZIER, LUTHER CARLOS. 

(No. 541. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 



343 

Great-grandson of SILAS GLAZIER. [See Bates, 
Sarah Glazier.^ 

Also, great-grandson of ZEBEDIAH MARCY. [See 
Bates, Mrs. Sarah Glazier^ 

GLAZIER, MARY OLIVIA. 

(No. ^ip. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-granddaughter of SILAS GLAZIER. [See 
Bates, Mrs. Sarah Glazier?^ 

Also, great-granddaughter of ZEBEDIAH MARCY, 
[See Bates, Mrs. Sarah Glazier. '\ 

GODDARD, HENRY PERKINS. 

(No. 383. Admitted Oct. 21, i8pi.) Of Baltimore, Mary- 
land; insurance manager; born at Salem, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of Dr. ELISHA PERKINS. [See 
Coit, George Douglas.^ 

GOLD, THEODORE SEDGWICK. 

(No. P04. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of West Cornwall, 
Connecticut; farmer and secretary of the State Board 
of Agriculture; born at Madison, New York. 

Great-grandson of MOSES CLEVELAND, who 
turned out in Lexington alarm, 1775. 

GOODRICH, ALFRED RUSSELL. 

(No. 1002. Admitted Sept. i^, i8gi.) Of Vernon, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Gill, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of GEORGE GOODRICH {its^-^Ho)- Of 
Glastonbury, Connecticut, who served as a private un- 
der General Horatio Gates, and was at the surrender 
of Burgoyne at Saratoga. 

GOODRICH, ELIZUR STILLMAN. 

(No. 282. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Hartford & Wethersfield 
Railroad Company; born at Wethersfield, Connecticut- 



344 

Grandson of SIMEON GOODRICH, who served 
from August i8th to December 9, 1780, in the Con- 
necticut regiment commanded by Colonel S. B. Webb. 

^GOODRICH, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. 26J. Admitted March 2p, iSpo.J Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; newspaper publisher; born at Hartford. 
Died February 25, 1894. 

Grandson of ICHABOD , GOODRICH. ^See Year 
Book, 1 8^3-4, pp. 2^8, 42^.1^ 

GOODSELL, BULL. 

(No. p6i. Admitted Feb. 11, 18^5.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bank clerk; born at Flushing, New York. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC GOODSELI (1763-1845), 
of Washington, Connecticut, who served as a private 
for four months and twenty-five days in 1780 in the 
company of Captain Billings in the 7th Connecticut 
regiment, under Colonel Heman Swift. 

GOODSELL, DANIEL AYERS. 
(No. looj. Admitted May 10, i8ps.) Of San Francisco, 
California; bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church; 
born at Newburgh, New York. 

Grandson of ISAAC GOODSELL. [See Goodsell, 
Buel.'] 

GOODSELL, GRANVILLE WHITE. 

(No. ^21. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Kent, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of EPAPHRAS GOODSELL. [See 
Banks, Kittie Evelin.^ 

GOODSELL, LEWIS. 

(No. 2yo. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Redding, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Fairfield, Connecticut. 



345 

Son of LEWIS GOOD SELL, of Fairfield, Connecticut 

(1744 ), a Sergeant in Captain Dimon's company 

of Fairfield, in May, 1775, and in 1777 Lieutenant in 
Captain Hill's company, on duty at the time of Tryon's 
invasion. He became Captain of the Fairfield com- 
pany, October 22, 1782. 

GOODSELL, PERRY SMITH. 

(JVo. 322. Admitted June i^, i8qi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Kent, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of EPAPHRAS GOODSELL, \See 
Banks, Kittie Evelin.'] 

GOODSELL, ZALMON. 

(No. 523. Admitted June 7-5, i8qi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Kent, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of EPAPHRAS GOODSELL. ^See 
Banks, Kittie Evelin^ 

GOODWIN, FRANCIS. 

(No. 61. Admitted April 27, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of LEMUEL ROBER TS. \^See Fenn, 
John Roberts^ 

*GOODWIN, GEORGE HENRY. 

(No. 23^. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of East Hartford, 
Connecticut; born at East Hartford. Died December 
19, 1893. 

Grandson of ANDREW KINGSBURY. [See Year 
Book, i8Q3-4,pp. 2SP, 435 ''I 

GOODWIN, JAMES JUNIUS. 

(No. 203. Admitted Oct. 75, i88g.) Of New York city; 
banker; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of LEMUEL ROBER TS. [See Fenn, 
John Roberts^ 



34^ 

GOODWIN, NELSON JONES. 

(No. 640. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; dentist; born at New Britain, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of OZIAS GOODWIN.oi Litchfield, 
Connecticut (1735-1788), Ensign, January i, 1777, of a 
company of volunteers raised in the town of Litch- 
field. He participated in the defense of Danbury 
against the raid under Tryon in the same year. 

GOODYEAR, EDWARD BASSETT. 

(No. 6$2. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Naugatuck, 
Connecticut; cashier; born at Washington,Connecticut. 
Great-grandson of STEPHEN GOODYEAR, of 
Hamden, Connecticut (1729-1803), who commanded a 
company in service near New York in 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of Captain JOHN GILBERT 

( 1779), killed in the defense of New Haven, July 

5, 1779- 

GOODYEAR, ROBERT BEARDSLEY. 

(No. Syj. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of North Haven, 
Connecticut; physician and surgeon; born at North 
Haven. 

Great-grandson of THEOPHILUS GOODYEAR 
(1731-1793), He entered service in 1776 in the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel William Douglas. This 
regiment served on the right of the line of works at 
Brooklyn during the battle of Long Island, was at 
Kip's Bay at the time of the enemy's attack, Septem- 
ber 15, and participated in the battle of White 
Plains. In 1777 he was a Corporal under the same 
Colonel in the 6th regiment, Connecticut line. He 
served until 1780, 

GOODYEAR, WATSON EDWARD. 
(No. g62. Admitted Dec. 10, i8p4.) Of Naugatuck, Con- 
necticut; student; born at Chicago, Illinois. 

Great-great-grandson of STEPHEN GOODYEAR. 
\^See Goodyear, Edward Bassett.^ 



347 

GRANT, JAMES MONROE. 

(No. 2g. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Ash ford, Connecticut. 

Son of HAMILTON GRANT, of Ashford, Con- 
necticut, who served at Bunker Hill under Captain 
Knowlton. 

GRANT, ROSWELL. 

(No. 163. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of East Windsor 
Hill, Connecticut; farmer; born at East Windsor Hill. 

Grandson of ROSWELL GRANT, of East Windsor, 

Connecticut (1746 ), Captain of a company of 

militia in the regiment commanded by Colonel Oba- 
diah Johnson, in service in Rhode Island in 1778. 
Also, Captain of a company in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Enos, in service on the Hudson in 
the same year. 

Also, great-grandson of ERASTUS WOLCOTT, of 
Windsor, Connecticut (1722-1793), who commanded a 
Connecticut regiment at the siege of Boston. He was 
afterwards appointed Brigadier-General of the ist 
brigade, and was on duty at Peekskill, March to June, 
1777. 

Also, great-grandson of LEMUEL STOUGHTON, 
Captain of a company from the town of East Windsor 
in the Lexington alarm. He commanded a company 
in New York in 1776. In May, 1777, he was appointed 
Major of the 19th regiment of Connecticut militia, of 
which regiment he was subsequently Colonel. He 
also acted as purchasing Commissary east of the Con- 
necticut river. 

GRAVES, JOSEPH ALVIN. 

(No. 837. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; teacher; born at Springfield, Missouri. 

Great-grandson of ASA GRAVES (1755 ), who 

enlisted as a private in Captain Harvey's company. 



348 

Colonel Jonathan Brewer's regiment, July 13, 1775; 
served two weeks and four days; enlisted, November 
15, 1776, in Captain Daniels' company, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Smith's 6th regiment; served during the war; 
reported Sergeant-Major. Recommended, May 5, 1781, 
by Lieutenant-Colonel Calvin Smith, for promotion 
as Ensign in the 6th regiment, commanded by the 
said Smith. 

GREELEY, EDWIN SENECA. 

(No. 448. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant and manufacturer; born at 
Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Grandson of JOSEPH GREELEY, of Nottingham, 
New Hampshire (i 756-1840), who enlisted at Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, April 25, 1775, in Captain Wil- 
liam Walker's company of the 2d New Hampshire 
regiment. He was wounded at the battle of Bunker 
Hill. 

GREELEY, FRANKLIN MASTON. 

(No. 6p7. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; machinist; born at Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Grandson of JOSEPH GREELEY. [See Greeley, 
Edwin Seneca?^ 

GREENE, JACOB LYMAN. 

(No. 224. Admitted Feb. I'j, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance company; born at Waterford, Maine. 

Great-grandson of Lieutenant THOMAS GREENE^ 

of Rowley, Massachusetts, and Waterford, Maine, who 

was in active service for several years in the northern 

army under Gates. He was distinguished for gallan- 

~ try at Saratoga. 



349 

GREGORY, JAMES GLYNN. 

(No. S57' Ad?mtted Sept. Z5, i8qi.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Norwalk. 

Grandson of MOSES GREGORY, a Revolutionary 
soldier. 

Also, great-grandson of JABEZ GREGORY, Cap- 
tain of a company in the 9th regiment, Connecticut 
militia, at New York in August and Septerpber, 1776, 
and again in active service from October, 1776, to Jan- 
uary, 1777. 

GRIPPING, MARTIN HOYT. 

(No. 7p6. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pj.) Of Danbury, Con- 
necticut; cashier of the National Pahquioque Bank; 
born at Danbury. 

Great-grandson of RICHARD CHASE, of Rhode 
Island (i 751-1845), who was a member of the 2d Rhode 
Island regiment, commanded by Colonel Harry Bab- 
cock. He was wounded in 1776. 

GRIGGS, JOHN WILLIAM. 

(No. p6j. Admitted Oct. 16, i8g4.) Of Chaplin, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Hampton, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ROBERT HEWITT (1760-1829), of 
Stonington, Connecticut, who served as a private in 
the company of Captain Chapman in Colonel Parsons* 
regiment throughout the year 1776. He enlisted 
again in June, 1780, and served for six months as pri- 
vate in the company of Captain Sear, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel Reed. He again enlisted in 
March, 1781, in the company of Captain Mills, at- 
tached to the brigade of General David Waterbury. 
He was present at the surrender of Burgoyne, at 
which time he was acting as a substitute in the com- 
pany of Captain Hewitt, in the regiment commanded 
by Colonel Latimer. He was a pensioner. 
24 



3SO 

GRISWOLD, CHARLES CHANDLER. 

(No, 838. Admitted June 5, 18^3.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; grocer and provisioner; born at East Lyme, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL GRISWOLD (1736- 
1816), a Sergeant in the company that marched from 
Lyme in the Lexington alarm. 

GRISWOLD, EDWARD HAMMOND. 

(No. 4^7. Admitted May 28, i8gi.) Of East Hartford, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Rocky Hill, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of WHITE GRISWOLD. 

\^See A bell, Mary Kingsbury.'] 

GRISWOLD, (MRS.) ESTHER ELIZA HAMMOND. 
(No. 127. Admitted Dec. 12, i88p.) Wife of Rufus 
White Griswold, of Rocky Hill, Connecticut; born at 
Ellington, Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of WHITE GRISWOLD. {See 
Abell, Mary Kingsbury.] 

GRISWOLD, GEORGE FREDERICK. 

(No. 83^. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; proprietor of Curtis House; born at East 
Lyme, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL GRISWOLD. [See 
Griswold, Charles Chandler^ 

GRISWOLD, (MRS.) REBECCA EDDY NORTON. 
(No. 643. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Providence, Rhode 
Island; wife of Roger Marvin Griswold; born at Ber- 
lin, Connecticut. 

Great-great-granddaughter of ROGER NORTON, 
Sr., of Farmington, Connecticut ( 1807), a Ser- 
geant in the company of Captain Asa Bray, in Colonel 
Noadiah Hooker's Connecticut regiment, 1777. 



3SI 

GRISWOLD, ROBERT SAGE. 

(No. 840. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Cromwell, Con- 
necticut; born at Rocky Hill, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of CONSTANT GRISWOLD (1753- 
1839), a private soldier in Captain John Chester's com- 
pany, which marched from Wethersfield in the Lex- 
ington alarm, 1775. Enlisted May 12, 1775, under the 
same Captain, and continued with his company until 
the expiration of the term of service the following 
December; he was engaged in the battle of Bunker 
Hill; also rendered other services, and was a pen- 
sioner. 

Also, descendant of JEREMIAH HUBBARD, Jr. 
(i 746-1808), of Haddam, Connecticut, who was an En- 
sign in the 14th company, 7th regiment. 

GRISWOLD, ROGER MARVIN. 

(No. 7p. Admitted April 5, i88g.) Of Providence, 
Rhode Island; physician and surgeon; born at Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of WHITE GRISWOLD. ^See 
A bell, Mary Kingsbury.^ 

GRISWOLD, RUFUS WHITE. 

(No. 46. Admitted April ip, i88p.) Of Rocky Hill, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Manchester, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of ^^/r^ GRISWOLD. [See 
A bell, Mary Kingsbury.'] 

GROSS, CHARLES EDWARD. 

(No. los. Admitted Dec. 12, i88p.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JOHN BARNARD. [See Conk- 
lin, Harry Shepard.] 



352 

* GROSS, WILLIAM H. 

(No. io6. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookseller; born at Hartford. Died March 
19, 1891. 

Great-grandson of JOHN BARNARD. [See Year 
Book, iSpi, pp. iij, 201.] 

GUILD, FRANK EUGENE. 

(No. 1004. Admitted May 10, iSg^.) Of Windham, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Thompson, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN MEIGS (1742-1786), 
of Pomfret, Connecticut, who was a private under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Israel Putnam, in the company 
which marched from Pomfret in the Lexington alarm. 
He was also Ensign of the ist company of the nth 
regiment under Captain Caleb Clark, in service in 
New York in 1776. 

GULLIVER, FREDERIC PUTNAM. 

(No. 6q8. Admitted Jan. 6, 18^3.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; born at Norwich. 

Great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTINGTON. 
\See Bond, William Williams?^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of ANDREW HUNT- 
INGTON. [See Bond, William Williams 7^ 

Also, great-grandson of GERSHOM GULLIVER, 
of Milton, Massachusetts (1756-1840), a participator in 
the battle of Lexington, who was also at Dorchester 
Heights, Ticonderoga, and Crown Point. 

GULLIVER, HENRY STRONG. 
(No. iop8. Admitted Feb, 22, i8p6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; principal of High School; born at Nor- 
wich, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of GERSHOM GULLIVER. [See 
Gulliver, Frederic Putnam ?[ 



353 

HALE, ALMARIN TRACY. 
(No. 44^. Admitted Feb. i8^ i8qi.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; hotel keeper; born at Norwich, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of HEZEKIAH TRACY, of 
Norwich, Connecticut (1736-1791), 2d Lieutenant in 
the ist regiment, Connecticut line, formation of 
1777-81. 

*HALE, JOHN MILLS. 

(No. 3^6. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Philipsburg, 
Pennsylvania; attorney-at-law; born at Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania. Died June 17, 1894. 

Great-grandson of CHARLES SEYMOUR. ^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, p. 26^, and obituary, Year Book, 18^^-6^ 

HALE, JULIA LUCY. 

(No. J5J. Admitted Sept. 10, i8qo.) Of Philipsburg, 
Pennsylvania; born at Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 

Great-granddaughter of CHARLES SEYMOUR, of 
Hartford, Connecticut (1738-1802), who commanded a 
company in the ist regiment of Connecticut militia, 
Major Newbury, in the campaign around New York, 
1776. He also commanded a company in Colonel Bel- 
den's regiment at Peekskill, March-June, 1777. 

HALE, WALLACE LAMB. 

(No. lopp. Admitted Feb. 22, i8q6.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; hotel clerk; born at Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of HEZEKLAH TRACY. ^See 
Hale, Almarin Tracy ^ 

HALE, WILLIAM FOOTE. 
(No. 841. Admitted Sept. 12, i8pj.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; born at Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of HEZEKLAH TRACY. 
\^See Hale, Almarin Tracy. 1 



354 

HALL, ARTHUR ELISHA. 
(No. po^. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Berlin, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of STREET HALL, of Wal- 
lingford, Connecticut (17 21-1809), Lieutenant-Colonel 
of the 7tli regiment, Colonel Charles Webb, 1775; ^^ 
was in the same regiment, reorganized under Colonel 
Webb, 1776, as the 19th Continental, with the rank of 
Lieutenant-Colonel; he participated in the battles of 
White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. 

HALL, EUGENE ASHLEY. 

(No. po6. Admitted April ly, iSg4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; with Meriden Savings Bank; born at Meri- 
den. 

Great-grandson of DANLEL CLARK, of West 
Haven, Connecticut (i 764-1 847), who enlisted in Cap- 
tain Van Deusen's company, General Waterbury's 
State Brigade, 1781; served from February 21st to 
August I, 1 781. He also served in the company of 
Captain Mansfield for six weeks in the summer of 
1782. He was a pensioner. 

HALL, HENRY. 

(No. 3^4. Admitted Sept. 10, iSgo.) Of New York city; 
business superintendent of The Tribune; born at 
Auburn, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of WLLLLAM HALL (1741- 
183 1), of Stratford, Connecticut, Lieutenant in charge 
of a party of twenty-four men stationed throughout 
1 781 as coast guard at Stratfield Beach and New Fields 
(now Bridgeport). 

HALL, JAMES PHILIP. 
(No. 628. Admitted Feb. ij, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Portland, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of AMOS RANSOM. [See Gilder- 
sleeve, Alfred.^ 



3SS 

HALL, LEWIS CARROLL. 

(No. ^64. Admitted Feb. 11^ iSg^.) Of New Canaan, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at New Canaan. 

Great-great-grandson of LEVI STONE (1754-1836), 
a member of the 6th company of the 5th Connecticut 
regiment, commanded by Colonel David Waterbury, 
1775. This regiment served in New York in the sum- 
mer of 1775, and in the autumn went to the northern 
department and took part in the operations along 
Lakes George and Champlain. After the above ser- 
vice he was engaged as an artisan, and had charge of 
a company of smiths at Danbury, 

HALL, RUSSELL LEWIS. 

(No. 381. Admitted Oct. 20, i8pi.) Of New Canaan, 
Connecticut; president of the First National Bank; 
born at Warren, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of LEVI STONE. [See Hall, Lewis 
Car r oil. \ 

HALL, WILLIAM ALFRED. 

(No. poy. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Meriden. 

Great-great-grandson of STREET HALL. [See Hall, 
Arthur Elisha.^ 

HALLOCK, EDWIN. 

(No. y8j. Admitted April 18, i8gj.) Of Derby, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Derby. 

Grandson of WILLIAM HALLOCK, Jr. (1764- 
1817), who served five years in the war of the Revolu- 
tion, and was one year a prisoner in the Old Sugar 
House at New York. 

*HALSEY, JEREMIAH. 

(No. 112. Admitted Dec. 12, i88p.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Preston, Connecticut. Died 
February 9, 1896. 



356 

Grandson of JEREMIAH HALSEY. [See Year 
Book^ iSpj-4,p. 26'j^ and obituary^ Year Book, i^p^-d.] 

HAMILTON, PAUL DAVID. 

(JVo. iioo. Admitted Eeb. j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of EZRA STEVENS, of Dan- 
bury, Connecticut (i 724-1823). Lieutenant of the 6th 
company in the 5th Connecticut regiment, commanded 
by Colonel David Waterbury, raised on the first call 
for troops, April-May, 1775. This regiment marched 
to New York in the latter part of June, and in Sep- 
tember to the northern department, and took part in 
operations along Lakes George and Champlain. 

HAMMOND, EDWARD PAYSON. 

(No. 31. Admitted April 10, i88p,) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; evangelist; born at Ellington, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of WHITE GRISWOLD. [See 
Abell, Mary Kingsbury ^^ 

HARMON, JOHN MILTON. 

(No. 7P7. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Suffield, Connecticut. 
Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL HARMON, of 
Suffield, Connecticut (1736-1812), who responded to the 
call for volunteers in the Lexington alarm, April, 1775, 
and later in the same year was commissioned Lieuten- 
ant of the train band in the 2d society in the town of 
Suffield. 

HARRIMAN, FREDERICK DURBIN. 

(No. pds. Admitted Oct. 16, i8p4.) Of Windsor, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Windsor, Maine. 

Grandson of MORAL HELTON (1755-1840), of Pow- 
nalborough, Maine, who enlisted as a private from 
Pownalborough (then a part of Massachusetts), in 
May, 1775, in the company of Captain Josiah Stearns, 



3SV 

in the regiment commanded by Colonel Doolittle. He 
again enlisted in 1776 in the company commanded by 
Captain William Tew, in the Rhode Island regiment 
commanded by Colonel Hitchcock. He also, in Janu- 
ary, 1777, served as a Sergeant in the company of Cap- 
tain Wiley, in the Massachusetts regiment commanded 
by Colonel Jackson, enlisting for three years. In Oc- 
tober of that year he was transferred to Colonel 
Alden's regiment. From July to September, 1779, ^^ 
was Sergeant in the company of Captain Benjamin 
Lemont, in the Massachusetts regiment commanded 
by Colonel Samuel McCobb. He was present at the 
battles of Trenton, Stony Point, and at other engage- 
ments. He was a pensioner. 

HARRISON, HENRY BALDWIN. 
(No. 40. Admitted April 18, i88g.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; late Governor of Connecticut; born 
at New Haven. 

Grandson of 5^ J^CA^Z BARNEY. \See Barney, Sam- 
uel Eben^ 

^HARRISON, OSMUND. 

(No. 842. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut; born at Wethersfield. Died March 30, 
1895. 

Son of THEODORE HARRISON. ^See Year Book, 
18^3-4, p. 268, and obituary, Year Book, i8pj-d.] 

HART, ARTEMAS ELIJAH. 
(No. 2^p. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Society for Savings; born 
at New Britain, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELIJAH HART, 3d, of Farming- 
ton, Connecticut (i 759-1827), Sergeant in Captain Stod- 
dard's company of Colonel Moseley's Connecticut reg- 
iment, ordered to the Hudson soon after the battle of 
Monmouth, 1778. 



3S8 

HART, CHARLES EDGAR. 
(No. 50. Admitted April 22, i88q.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Durham, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL HART, of Durham, 
Connecticut (i 735-1805), a Lieutenant in the Revolu- 
tionary army, who took part in the engagements pre- 
ceding the surrender of Burgoyne. 

HART, FRANKLIN HENRY. 

(No. 23. Ad77iitted April 2, i88g.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; wholesale provisions; born at Durham, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL HART. [See Hart, 
Charles Edgar ^ 

HART, FREDERIC JONES. 

(No. 24. Admitted April 2, i88p.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; hotel keeper; born at Durham, Connecticut. 
Great-grandson of SAMUEL HART. [See Hart, 
Charles Edgar.'] 

HART, NATHANIEL REEVES. 

(No. iioi. Admitted Feb. 3, i8p6.) Of Stamford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Minisink, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of DAVLD HOWELL (1724- 
1802), of Moriches, Long Island, who was Captain of 
the ist company of the 2d regiment of Suffolk county. 
New York, and was engaged in the battle of Long 
Island. 

HATCH, GEORGE EDWIN. 

(No. ^82. Admitted Oct. 14, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at East Granville, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of TLMO THY HATCH {i^sI-t^^^^), 
of Oxford, Connecticut, who was in the battle of White 
Plains, where he was taken prisoner, and afterward 
held by the enemy in New York. 



359 

HATCH, LEVI PARSONS. 
(No. 384. Admitted Oct. 21, i8qo.) Of Millerton, New 
York; born at Coxsackie, New York. 

Grandson of MOSES HATCH {1^60-1^7,^), of Weth- 
ersfield, Connecticut, who, at the age of sixteen, en- 
listed as drummer, and served in various capacities 
during the Revolutionary war. 

HAWLEY, CHARLES WILSON. 
(No. 843. Admitted Feb. 12^ 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-grandson of WILLIAM WORDIN {\^2>\- 
1808), of Stratford, Connecticut, a Lieutenant in Cap- 
tain Abijah Sterling's company, in Colonel Whiting's 
regiment of Connecticut militia, in active service in 
October, 1777; he was also Captain of a militia com- 
pany called the Householders, which acted as a home 
and coast guard. 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM WORDIN, Jr., 
a private in the company in Colonel Whiting's regi- 
ment in which his father was Lieutenant. 

HAWLEY, ELIAS SILL. 

(No. 8p. Admitted May 13, i88p.) Of Buffalo, New 
York; iron manufacturer; born at Moreau, New York. 

Grandson of AMOS HAWLEY, of Farmington, 
Connecticut, a private in Captain Stanley's company. 
Colonel Gay's regiment, Wadsworth's brigade, which 
served at the Brooklyn front during the battle of Long 
Island, in the retreat to New York, the retreat from 
New York, and with the main army at White Plains, 
1776. 

HAYDEN, EDWARD SIMEON. 

(No. p2p. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; born at Waterbury. 



360 

Great-great-grandson of JO SI AH HA YD EN ( 1 733- 
1810), of Braintree, Massachusetts, who served as 
Corporal from August to November 30, 1777, in the 
company of Captain Kirkwood in the Massachusetts 
regiment of Colonel Woodbridge. 

Also, great-grandson of SIMEON G UILFORD 
(1751-1844), of Williamsburg, Massachusetts, who en- 
listed in March, 1776, in the company commanded 
by Captain Jonathan Allen, in the regiment of Colonel 
Jonathan Ward, and served until January i, 1777. He 
again enlisted in December, 1777, and served two years 
and five months in the company of Captain Goodale, 
5th Massachusetts Continentals, commanded by Col- 
onel Rufus Putnam. He also served from April, 1781, 
to June, 1783, in the company of Captain Mason Wat- 
tles, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Calvin 
Smith. He was then transferred to Colonel Sprout's 
command, where he served as Sergeant until the close 
of the war. He was a pensioner. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH SHEPARD 
(1746-1832), of Wrentham, Massachusetts, who served 
for five days in the Lexington alarm, in the com- 
any of Captain Samuel Cowell, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel John Smith. He was also com- 
missioned ist Lieutenant in the 3d Massachusetts 
regiment, commanded by Colonel Sumner, July i, 1781. 

HAYDEN, HEZEKIAH SIDNEY. 
(No. 488. Admitted May 4, i8gi.) Of Windsor, Con- 
necticut; born at Windsor. 

Grandson of lEVI HAYDEN, of Windsor, Con- 
necticut (1747-1821), a private soldier in Captain John 
Skinner's company, in Major Sheldon's regiment of 
Light Horse. 

Also, grandson of JABEZ HASKELL, of Pine- 
meadow (now Windsor Locks), Connecticut, who 
served in the summer of 1776 at New York. 



361 

HAYDEN, JABEZ HASKELL. 
(No. 148. Admitted Feb, 4^ i8go.) Of Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut; retired manufacturer; born at Windsor, 
Connecticut. 

Grandson of LEVI HA YDEN. ySee Hayden, Hezekiah 
Sidney^ 

Also, grandson of JABEZ HASKELL. {^See Hay den, 
Hezekiah Sidney^ 

Also, great-grandson of Lieut. RETURN STRONG, 
a Revolutionary soldier. 

HAYDEN, NATHANIEL WARHAM. 

(No. i4p. Admitted Feb. 4, i8po.) Of Windsor, Con- 
necticut; investment broker; born at Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of LEVI HAYDEN. [See Hay den, 
Hezekiah Sidney^ 

Also, great-grandson of JABEZ HASKELL. [See 
Hay den, Hezekiah Sidney.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of Lieutenant RETURN 
STRONG. [See Hayden, Jabez Haskell?^ 

HEATH, EDWIN LANSING. 

(No. 752. Admitted Feb. 22, i8pj.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Bristol, Rhode Island. 

Great-grandson of PELEG HEATH,Yih.o, from 1777 
to 1 781, was Major of a regiment of militia of Bristol 
County, Rhode Island. In 1777 he was on recruiting 
service. 

HEATON, JOHN EDWARD. 

(No. 226. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; treasurer; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of JOHN J EN N I SON, of Walpole, 
New Hampshire (i 744-1804), ist Lieutenant in Cap- 
tain Christopher Webber's company in the i6th regi- 
ment, New Hampshire militia, Colonel Bellows, in 
1776. This regiment reinforced the garrison at Ticon- 



362 

deroga when besieged by the enemy in June, 1777. He 
was afterwards Captain of a company which went to 
Newbury, Vermont, in 1780. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN FULLER 
(1731-1801), of Lunenburg, Massachusetts, Captain in 
Colonel Asa Whitcombe's 4th Massachusetts regiment, 
1775 to 1782, In 1778 was representative to the con- 
vention for ratifying the Constitution of the United 
States. 

Also, great-great-grandson of THEOP HL LUS 
GOODYEAR. \^See Goodyear, Robert Beardsley.l 

HEMINWAY, MERRITT. 

(No. 6pQ. Admitted May 16, i8g2.) Of Watertown, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Watertown. 

Great-grandson of PETER BUELL, of Litchfield, 
Connecticut (1739-1797), who, in 1775, was Ensign of 
the 2d company of the town of Litchfield. 

HENDEE, EDWARD DWIGHT. 

(No. 57. Admitted April 24, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant tailor; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of CALEB HENDEE, Ensign in 
Captain James Dana's company. General Waterbury's 
brigade. 

HENRY, EDWARD STEVENS. 
(No. jip. Admitted April 75, i88g.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; member of Congress; born at Gill, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN GREENLEAE, of 
Boston, Massachusetts, and Brattleboro, Vermont, a 
member of the organization known as the " Sons of 
Liberty," in Boston, and one of the " Boston Tea 
Party." 

HERRINGTON, ALFRED GILBERT. 

(No. 12. Admitted April 2, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; machinist; born at Hoosick, New York. 



3^3 

Great-grandson of SILAS HERRINGTON (1740- 
-), of Scituate, Rhode Island, a private soldier in 



the Revolutionary war. 

Also, great-grandson of ELIJAH SPAULDING, 
who participated in the battle of Stillwater, and was 
with the army at the surrender of Burgoyne, 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of GEORGE DEFOREST, a 
private soldier. 

HEWINS, CAROLINE MARIA. 
(No. 181. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; librarian of the Hartford Public Library. 

Great-great-granddaughter of WILLIAM HEWINS 
(1735-1802), a Revolutionary soldier from Sharon, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1777. 

Also, great-great-granddaughter of SILAS ALDEN, 
of Needham, Massachusetts (1736-1826), who was a 
descendant in the fifth generation of John Alden and 
Priscilla Mullins, of the Mayflower. Silas Alden was 
an Ensign in Captain Robert Smith's company, which 
took part in the battle of Lexington. He was also a 
Lieutenant in a company commanded by Captain 
Smith, at Dorchester, 1776, and in the same year he 
served at Castle Island. 

HEWITT, ELISHA. 

(No. 524. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; apothecary; born at Pomfret, Windsor 
County, Vermont. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL PUTNAM, of 
Pomfret, Connecticut (1718-1790), senior Major-Gen- 
eral of the Continental army. "He dared to lead 
where any dared to follow." 

\^See address of John A. Porter, p. 1^3, and paper by Jon- 
athan Trumbull, p. 211.] 



^adt^^U^ 



nUa;i 



3^4 

HILL, EBENEZER. 

(No. 38^. Admitted Oct. 21^ i8qo.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer and president of the National 
Bank of Norwalk; born at Norwalk. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER HILL, of Fairfield, 

Connecticut (1742 ), Captain of the ist company 

in the 7th Connecticut regiment commanded by Colonel 
Charles Webb. The term of service of this regiment 
expired December, 1775. ^^ re-entered service Janu- 
ary I, 1777, as a ist Lieutenant in the 7th regiment, 
Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel Heman Swift. 
He was made Captain, November i, 1777, and trans- 
ferred to the invalid corps September 17, 1780. Colonel 
Swift's regiment went into the field in the spring of 
1777; fought at Germantown October 4, 1777; wintered 
at Valley Forge, 1777-78, and in the following June 
was present at the battle of Monmouth. In the sum- 
mer of 1779 it served on the east side of the Hudson 
in General Heath's wing. 

HILL, EBENEZER J. 

(No. 2g^. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; member of Congress; born at Redding, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER HILL. \See Hill, 
Ebenezer?[ 

Also, great-grandson of ENOCH ILLSLEY, of Port- 
land, Maine, a member of the committee ot safety of 
Falmouth, in 1774. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH M^LELLAN, of 
Portland, Maine, a member of the committee of safety 
of Falmouth, in 1774. 

HILL, EDWIN ALLSTON. 

(No. 1102. Admitted by demit from Ohio Society, Eeb. j, 
i8gf6.) Of West Haven, Connecticut; secretary to the 
Commissioner of Patents; born at New York city. 



3^5 

Great-grandson of REUBEN HILL (1746-1835), of 
East Guilford, Connecticut, who was a member of a 
company from Guilford, which marched to Boston in 
the Lexington alarm. He also rendered other ser- 
vice. 

Also, great-grandson of RICHARD STOKES (1762- 
1848), of Westbrook, Connecticut, who was a soldier 
in a Connecticut regiment, and with others was 
selected by General Washington, while encamped at 
White Plains, to proceed to Staten Island, by way of 
New York, to receive certain moneys which had been 
sent over from France, which expedition was suc- 
cessfully executed. He was a pensioner. 

HILL, (MRS.) MARY ELLEN MOSMAN. 

(No. 4Q4, Admitted May 28, i8gi.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; wife of Ebenezer J. Hill; born at Amherst, 
Massachusetts. 

Great-granddaughter of ABNER GOODALE, of 
Marlborough, Massachusetts (1755-1823), who, on the 
day of the battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775, ^^ ^^^ 
age of nineteen, joined Captain How's company, and 
marched to Cambridge. In December of that year he 
was a member of Captain Gates' company. He turned 
out October 2, 1777, in the company of Captain Wil- 
liam Morse, which marched to the assistance of Gen- 
eral Gates, and he was probably present at the sur- 
render of Burgoyne. 

Also, great-granddaughter of JEDUTHAN RICE^ 
of Montague, Massachusetts, who, in 1778, was a mem- 
ber of Captain Jotham Houghton's company, in the 
7th regiment, in General Warner's (Massachusetts) 
brigade, detached to escort the troops (Burgoyne's) of 
the convention of Saratoga, to Enfield, Connecticut. 
He also served in Captain Ephraim Stearns' company. 
Colonel Rains' regiment, in 1780. 
25 



2,66 

HILL, ROBERT WAKEMAN. 

(No. SSS. Admitted Sept. 7-5, i8gi.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; architect; born at Waterbury. 

Grandson of GILES BRACKETT (1761-1842), of 
North Haven, Connecticut, a Revolutionary soldier, 
and pensioner. 

HILLARD, PAUL HERMAN. 

(No. 844. Admitted Feb. 12^ 18^4.) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; insurance business; born at North Stoning- 
ton, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN HILLARD (1756-1826), a Cor- 
poral in Captain Hyde's company, 4th regiment, Con- 
necticut line; served from January i, 1777, to 1780. 

HILLHOUSE, JAMES WILLIAM. 

(No. 845. Admitted Jan. 16, i8p4.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Montville, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of WILLIAM HILLHOUSE 
(1728-1816), a Major of the 2d Connecticut regiment of 
Light Horse; a member of the council of safety for 
Connecticut. 

HILLS, JONAS COOLIDGE. 
(No. 2^2. Admitted Feb. ly, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JONAS COOLIDGE, of Water- 
town, Massachusetts (1744-1776), a private in Captain 
Samuel Barnard's company, in Colonel Thomas Gard- 
ner's regiment of Massachusetts militia, which 
marched in the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He 
also served in Captain Abner Craft's company in the 
37th regiment of foot. 



/r"^c^//,Z 



4^ 



3^7 

HILLS, WILLIAM ELLERY. 

(No. 3g8. Admitted Dec, 22^ 18^0.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of JONAS COOLIDGE. \^See 
Hills ^ Jonas Coolidge.'] 

*HILLYER, CHARLES TUDOR. 
(No. 331. Admitted May 10^ i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Granby, Connecticut. Died March 3, 
1891. 

Son of ANDREW HILLYER. {^See Year Book, i8gi ^ 
pp. 120, zp/.] 

HILLYER, DRAYTON. 

(No. 286. Admitted March 2p, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Granby, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ANDREW HILLYER, of Simsbury 
and Granby, Connecticut (i 743-1828), who mustered a 
number of men and marched for Boston in the Lex- 
ington alarm, April, 1775. I^ the same year he was 
commissioned a 2d Lieutenant in the 4th company of 
the 8th regiment, commanded by Colonel Jedediah 
Huntington. August 23d, Huntington made Hillyer 
his Adjutant, speaking of him at the same time as "an 
old soldier, a sensible man, and a good scholar." In 
the campaign of 1776 he was the Adjutant of Colonel 
Jonathan Pettibone's regiment of Connecticut militia, 
and was with it at Kip's Bay, on the East river, when 
the enemy landed, September 15, and took the city. 
In the summer of 1777 he served as a Lieutenant in a 
company commanded by Captain Noah Phelps, under 
Putnam on the Hudson, and, on the promotion of Cap- 
tain Phelps, he had command of the company. In 
1779 he was appointed Captain of a troop in the 5th 
regiment of Connecticut Light Horse; was stationed 
at Horse Neck, and participated in the defense of New 
Haven. After the war he became Colonel of the 5th 
Connecticut Dragoons. 



368 

HITCHCOCK, HENRY PRESTON. 

(No. I4S, Admitted Dec. 12, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant tailor; born at Hartford. 

Grandson of JOHN LEE HITCHCOCK, of Che- 
shire, Connecticut, a private soldier in service for 
three years, probably in the 5th regiment, Connecticut 
line, commanded by Colonel Bradley. 

*HOLBROOK, SUPPLY TWYNG. 

(No. iy6. Admitted Eeb. 4, i8po.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; judge of probate; born at Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. Died April 19, 1895. 

Grandson of SETH HOLBROOK. \See Year Book, 
i^93-4->P- ^77 't ^^^ obituary, Year Book, iSpj-d.] 

HOLCOMBE, JOHN MARSHALL. 

(No. 160. Admitted Eeb. 5, iSpo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; vice-president of the Phoenix Mutual Life 
Insurance Company; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of FHINEAS HOLCOMB (17— 
-1833), of Simsbury, Connecticut, a private soldier in 
Captain Matthew Smith's company of Connecticut 
militia of General Waterbury's state brigade, in act- 
ive service in 1781. He was a pensioner. 

HOLLISTER, HERBERT HENRY. 

(No. 846. Admitted May 10, iSpj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at New Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of ELIJAH STRONG HOLLIS- 
TER (1763-1813), who, in 1780, enlisted at Lenox under 
Captain Stoddard, in the Massachusetts regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Vose, and was stationed near West 
Point, New York. In the following year he was a 
Quartermaster-Sergeant in the Massachusetts regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Sears, in which he 



3^9 

served for three months and twelve days from July 21, 
1781. Soon thereafter he joined a New York regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel Marinus Willett, as Ser- 
geant, and he was finally discharged in the winter of 
1784. 



7 



■U/Sa:^ 



HOLLISTER, JOHN CLARK. 

(JVo. 41. Admitted April 18^ i88q.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Manchester, Vermont. 

Grandson of ELIJAH STRONG HOLLISTER, 
\^See Hollister^ Herbert Henry ^ 

HOLMES, CHARLES LEYLAND. 

(No. 1 1 03. Admitted March 2j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; secretary and treasurer of corporation; 
born in Liverpool, England. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL JUDD (1734- 
1825), of Waterbury, Connecticut, who before the 
Revolution held a commission as Lieutenant of mil- 
itia, and on June 24, 1783, was commissioned as Cap- 
tain of the 9th company in the 27th Connecticut regi- 
ment. 

*HOLMES, JOSEPH. 

(No. g8. Admitted Sept. 16, i88g.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut. Died January 15, 1894. 

Grandson of ELIPHALET HOLMES. \^See Year 
Book, i8p3-4,pp. 278, 433?^ 

HOLMES, WALTER WETMORE. 

(No. 1 104. Admitted March 23, i8p6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Waterloo, England. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL JUDD. {^See 
Holmes, Charles Ley land ^^ 



370 

HOLT, ALFRED. 

(No. lo^o. Admitted Oct. i^, iSg^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; builder; born at East Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL HOLT, 2d (1743-1831), 
of East Haven, Connecticut, who served as a soldier 
and was probably a member of the company of Cap- 
tain Brackett under Colonel Douglas, which was 
attached to Wadsworth's brigade and sent to reinforce 
Washington at New York, in service from June to 
December, 1776. The tradition is that he rendered 
other service. 

HOLT, ALTON G. 

(No. ii3g. Admitted April 21, i8g6.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; designer; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL HOLT, 2d. \^See 
Holt, Alfred:\ 

HOOKER, EDWARD. 

(No. 2g6. Admitted March 2g, iSgo. ) Of Brooklyn, New 
York; Commander United States Navy (retired); born 
at Farmington, Connecticut. 

Grandson of NOADLAH HOOKER, of Farmington, 
Connecticut (1737-1823), in 1774 a member of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence, and of the committee for 
raising relief for the people of Boston. He was active 
in the burning of the " Boston Port Bill " at Farming- 
ton, raising the first " Liberty tree," and was Captain 
of a band of "Liberty-men." In 1775, he raised the 
first company of enlisted men at Farmington for the 
army at Boston, and marched there in advance of any 
other Connecticut troops. April 26, 1775, he was ap- 
pointed Captain of the 6th company of the 2d Con- 
necticut regiment. This regiment took post at Rox- 
bury and served during the siege, till the expiration 
of its term of service, December, 1775. He was also 



371 

Captain of a company in Colonel Wolcott's regiment 
at Boston, January to March, 1776. In 1777, he was 
Colonel of a regiment of Connecticut militia, in ser- 
vice at Peekskill, under General Erastus Wolcott. 

HOOKER, EDWARD BEECHER. 
(No. 186. Admitted Feb. 4, i8qo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of NOADIAH HOOKER. \^See 
Hooker^ Edward?^ 

HOOKER, EDWARD WILLIAMS. 

(No. i^p. Admitted Feb. 4, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the Broad Brook Company; 
born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH BAKER, of Brooklyn, 
Connecticut (1748-1804), Surgeon in Putnam's company 
in the Lexington alarm, and later Surgeon at Fort 
Griswold. In 1777 he was a member of the Brooklyn 
committee to procure clothes for the soldiers. 

HOOKER, THOMAS WILLIAMS. 

(No. '^84. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH BAKER. {See Hooker, 
Edward Williams^ 

HOOPER, JOSEPH. 
(No. 1 10^. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Durham, Con- 
necticut; clergyman and lecturer at Berkeley Divinity 
School; born at Brooklyn, New York. 

Great-grandson of General ELIAS DAYTON (1727- 
1807), of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, who was a Colonel 
of the New Jersey militia and commanded the volun- 
teers who captured Blue Mountain valley January 23, 
1776. He was commissioned Colonel of the 3d New 
Jersey battalion February 9, 1776, and was with his 



372 

regiment at Ticonderoga tinder General Schuyler. 
He took part in the battles of Short Hills, Spring- 
field, Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, and York- 
town. At Yorktown he assisted in forming the last 
line of trenches. From June to September, 1779, ^^ 
was with General John Sullivan in his campaign 
against the Indians. On the resignation of General 
Maxwell, July 20, 1780, he was appointed to command 
the New Jersey brigade, and January 8, 1783, he was 
commissioned by the United States a Brigadier-Gen- 
eral, and served to the close of the war. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH WHITTEMORE 
{1743-182 1), of Newburyport, Massachusetts, who, in 
the month of May, 1775, enlisted men for the company 
of Captain Benjamin Perkins, forming part of the 
regiment of Colonel Moses Little, under commission 
as Lieutenant from "The Congress of the Colony of 
Massachusetts Bay," dated at Watertown, Massachu- 
setts, May 19, 1775. He served with his company at 
the battle of Bunker Hill, and was there wounded. 
After his recovery he served at Prospect Hill until 
February, 1776, when, being reported unfit to proceed 
with his regiment, he was assigned to garrison duty 
at Plumb Island, in Newburyport harbor, in the com- 
pany commanded by Captain Newell. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

HOPSON, JOHN, Jr. 

(No. 55p. Admitted Sept. zf, i8gi.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Kent, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of PETER MILLS, of Kent, 
Connecticut (1741-1821), a Lieutenant in the 7th com- 
pany of the 7th Connecticut regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Charles Webb in 1775. He was in command 
of a company which turned out for the defense of 
Danbury against Tryon in 1777, and for the defense 
of New Haven in 1779. 



373 

HOTCHKISS, EDWIN BENTON. 
(No. pjo. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; draughtsman; born at Westport, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of GIDEON HOTCH- 
KISS, \See Cow ell ^ George Hubert^ 

*HOTCHKISS, GEORGE LEANDER. 

(No. 214. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; born at Naugatuck, Connecticut. Died June 
10, 1892. 

Great-great-grandson of GIDEON HOTCHKISS. 
\See Year Book, iSpj-4, pp. 2'jg, 406.] 

HOTCHKISS, HOBART LEGRAND. 

(No. 75. Admitted April 24, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; Judge Court of Common Pleas; born at 
Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of GIDEON HOTCHKISS. 
YSee Cow ell, George Hubert i\ 

Also, great-grandson of ANTHONY SMITH (175 1- 
1838), of Waterbury, Connecticut; who enlisted at 
Waterbury, and served for eight and a half months as 
a private in the Connecticut troops, a portion of the 
time under Captain Phineas Porter. He was granted 
a pension, as was also his widow, for this service. 

♦HOTCHKISS, ORRIN WAIT. 

(No. 208. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Westport, Con- 
necticut; born at Waterbury, Connecticut. Died Jan- 
uary 31, 1893. 

Great-great-grandson of GIDEON HOTCHKISS. 
\See Year Book, i8pj-4, pp. 2yp, 414.] 

HOTCHKISS, SAMUEL MILO. 

(No. ipp. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; salesman; born at Berlin, Connecticut. 



374 

Great-grandson of PHINEAS CASTLE, of Water- 
bury, Connecticut (1731 ), a Captain in the regi- 
ment commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Baldwin, in 
active service in 1777 on the North river. The regi- 
ment also turned out to repel the enemy at New 
Haven, July, 1779. 

Also, great-great-grandson of GIDEON HOTCH- 
KISS. \^See Cornell, George Hubert.'] 

HOUSTON, JAMES BORLAND. 

(No. J17. Admitted April zf, i8go.) Of Thompson ville, 
Connecticut; assistant superintendent of the Hartford 
Carpet Company; born at Thompsonville. 

Great-grandson of SIMON UPSON, of Southing- 
ton, Connecticut (1760 ), a private soldier in Cap- 
tain Jabez Fitch's com.pany of independent volunteers, 
in service from August 17 to November 17, 1782. 

Also, great-great-grandson of NATHAN ALLYN, 
seaman on the privateer " Marquis de La Fayette " 
from February 27, 1782, to August 13, 1783. 

HOVEY, HORACE CARTER. 

(No. 34. Admitted April 16, i88g.) Of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts; clergyman and author; born in Foun- 
tain County, Indiana. 

Grandson of ROGER HOVEY (1758-18—), of Mans- 
field, Connecticut, who enlisted in 1776 at the age of 
seventeen or eighteen years, in the Connecticut militia, 
was present at the evacuation of Boston, and again 
enlisted for one year. He was a pensioner, his name 
appearing on the Vermont roll, to which state he 
removed after the war. 

HOWE, SAMUEL HENRY. 

(No. yoo. Admitted April ig, 1 8g2.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born in the County of Fleming, 
Kentucky. 



375 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM ROBERTSON, of 
Virginia (1754-1833), a Revolutionary soldier in the 
infantry service. 

Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL MAR- 
SHALL (17 1800), of Virginia, an officer in the 

Revolutionary war, who was present at the surrender 
of Lord Cornwallis. 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA ARNOLD, of Vir- 
ginia (1758-1849), a Revolutionary soldier, who was 
made a prisoner by the British. 

ROWLAND, (MRS.) HARRIET MARGARET 
LEARNED. 

(No. 75J. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^2.) Wife of George Titus 
Rowland, M. D., of Norwich, Connecticut; born at 
Norwich. 

Great-great-granddaughter of BELA PECK (\^^Z- 
), Captain of a matross company, of Norwich, Con- 
necticut, which marched for the defense of New Lon- 
don in 1781. 

HOYT, RENRY TRACHER. 

(No. yoi. Admitted Jan. d, iSpj.) Of Danbury, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Danbury. 

Great-grandson of PETER PENFLELD, of New 

Fairfield, Connecticut (1743 ), who served during 

the greater part of the Revolutionary war as an officer 
in the army, beginning as Ensign and ending as Cap- 
tain. In 1776 he was ist Lieutenant in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel Gold Selleck Silliman. This 
regiment served on the Brooklyn front during the bat- 
tle on Long Island, in the retreat to New York, and 
narrowly escaped capture in the retreat from that city, 
September 15. It was engaged in the battle of White 
Plains, in which it suffered some loss. Re was among 
the militia captains whose companies turned out to 
repel the enemy at New Raven in 1779, at the time of 
Tryon's invasion. 



376 

*HOYT, HEUSTED W. R. 

(No. 848. Ad7nitted Oct. ly^ iSgj.) Of Gieenwich, Con- 
necticut; coimselor-at-law; born at Ridgefield, Con- 
necticut. Died April 7, 1894. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL OSBORN. [See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. 282, 4jy.] 

HUBBARD, GASTON TRYON. 

(No. S7S- Admitted Oct. 14, i8gi.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Wadesboro, North 
Carolina. 

Great-grandson of GEORGE HUBBARD, 5th i^i'^^^- 
1809), a Captain in Colonel Comfort Sage's regiment of 
Connecticut militia, which turned out to repel the 
enemy at the time of Tryon's invasion in 1779. 

HUBBARD, JOSIAH MEIGS. 

(No. 4SO. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; farmer; born at Middletown. 

Grandson of JEREMIAH HUBBARD, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut (1732-1814), ist Lieutenant in Cap- 
tain Shepherd's company, Colonel Belden's regiment, 

1777. 

Also, grandson of ELISHA HUBBARD, of Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut (1753-1837), who enlisted June 
17, 1776, as a private in the company of Captain Jona- 
than Johnson of Middletown, battalion of Colonel 
Phillip B. Bradley, Wadsworth's brigade. He was one 
of the prisoners captured by the British at the attack 
on Fort Washington, November 16, 1776, and was con- 
fined for some time in New York city. 

HUBBARD, LEVERETT MARSDEN. 
(No. ^42. Admitted April 21, i8gi.) Of Wallingford, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Durham, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY SCRAN TON, of 
Guilford, Connecticut (1761-1848), who enlisted in the 



377 

Connecticut regiment commanded by Colonel Andrew 
Ward, in 1776. This regiment joined Washington's 
army at New York in August of that year, and was 
stationed at first near Fort Lee. It marched with the 
troops to White Plains, and it took part in the battles 
of Trenton and Princeton. On the loth of April, 1777, 
he re-enlisted in Captain Humphrey's company of the 
6th regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel 
William Douglas, which regiment was reorganized in 
January, 1781, as the 4th regiment, Connecticut line, 
and commanded by Colonel Zebulon Butler. He was 
a member of a light infantry company detached from 
this regiment, under command of Captain Samuel A. 
Barker, which formed part of the army sent to the 
southward under the Marquis de Lafayette, in 1 781, to 
check Arnold's invasion of Virginia. This detachment 
remained in Virginia, almost constantly on the march, 
until Cornwallis took post at Yorktown in August. At 
the siege, Lafayette's division held the post of honor 
on the right of the investing line, and the battalion 
under Colonel Gimat, to which Captain Barker's com- 
pany was attached, led the column that stormed one 
of the enemy's redoubts on the night of October 14, 
1781. 

HUBBARD, LOUIS BLOSSOM. 

(No. 1106. Admitted Feb. j», i8g6.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; clerk; born at Middletown, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great grandson of GEORGE HUBBARD, ^th 
(173T-1809), of Middletown, Connecticut, who was ap- 
pointed Captain of the 3d company of the 23d regi- 
ment, Connecticut militia, by the General Assembly, 
May, 1778. He also served as a Captain in Colonel 
Comfort Sage's regiment, which turned out to repel 
the invasion of New Haven by Tryon, July 5, 
1779. 



378 

*HUBBARD, STEPHEN A. 
(No. 20. Admitted April 2, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; editor; born at Sunderland, Massachusetts. 
Died January 11, 1890. 

Grandson of CALEB HUBBARD. ^See Year Book, 
iSgi^pp. 126, ip2.'\ 

HUBBARD, WALTER. 

(No. yo2. Admitted Jan. 6, iSpj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Middletown, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of JEREMIAH HUBBARD. [See Hub- 
bard, Josiah Meigs.] 

HUBBARD, WALTER BULKLEY. 

(No. 2dp. Admitted March 2p, i8qo.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; cashier of the Middlesex County National 
Bank; born at Middletown. 

Great-grandson of JEREMIAH HUBBARD. [See 
Hubbard, Josiah Meigs.] 

HUBBELL, HARVEY. 

(No. lOOS. Admitted May 10, i8q^.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Grandson of WILLIAM PINTO (1760-1847), of 
New Haven, Connecticut, who was a volunteer in 
1779 and 1781 and assisted in the defense of New 
Haven at the time of the invasion. 

HULBERT, GEORGE HUNTINGTON. 

(No. 666. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Middletown. 

Great-grandson of the Reverend ENOCH HUNT- 
INGTON, of Middletown, Connecticut (1739-1809). Mr. 
Huntington entered warmly into politics during the 
Revolutionary period, taking sides with his brothers — 



379 

one of whom, Samuel, was a signer of the Declaration 
of Independence — against England. Several of his 
sermons and addresses of that day were printed, and 
have been preserved. Worthy of especial notice are, 
**A sermon delivered at Middletown, July 20, 1775, the 
day appointed by the Continental Congress to be ob- 
served by the inhabitants of all the English colonies 
on this continent as a day of public humiliation, fast- 
ing and prayer," and " The Happy Effects of Union 
and the Fatal Tendency of Divisions," preached be- 
fore the inhabitants of the town of Middletown, at 
their annual meeting, April 8, 1776. 




HULBERT, THOMAS HENRY. 

(No. 66p. Admitted April zp, 18^2) Of Chicago, Illi- 
nois; real estate; born at Lee, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of AMOS HULBERT, of Chatham, Con- 
necticut (1752-1835). In 1776, he was a Corporal in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Philip Burr 
Bradley, and in 1777, a Sergeant in the company of 
Captain Joseph Blake, under command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel John Penfield. 

HULL, JOHN ALFRED. 

(No. S94' Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Clinton, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of ASA LAY, of Saybrook, Con- 
necticut (1749 ), enlisted May 8, 1775, in the 9th 

company of the 6th Connecticut regiment, command- 
ed by Colonel Samuel Holden Parsons. After the ex- 
piration of his term of service in this regiment, he 
was appointed Adjutant in Colonel Ely's regiment. 



38o 

January i, 1777, lie was commissioned ist Lieutenant 
in the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by- 
Colonel William Douglas, and he was afterward made 
Captain in this regiment. On the reorganization of 
the Connecticut line in 1781, he was commissioned as 
Captain in the 4th regiment, commanded by Colonel 
Zebulon Butler, and he remained in the service until 
the close of the war. 

HUNGERFORD, (MRS.) CAROLINE CATLIN. 

(No. yQ2. Admitted April 18, 18^3.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Harwinton, Connecticut. 

Granddaughter of ABIJAH CATLIN. [See Cat/in, 
Abijah^ Jr.'] 

HUNGERFORD, CLARENCE CATLIN. 

(No. yoj. Admitted Oct. 18, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Harwinton, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH CATLIN. [See Catlin, 
Abij'ah, Jr.] 

HUNGERFORD, NEWMAN. 

(No. 704. Admitted Oct. 18, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; salesman; born at Monticello, Georgia. 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH CATLIN. [See Catlin, 
Abijahy Jr.] 

HUNT, FREDERICK SAMUEL. 

(No. ys4' Admitted Feb. 22, i8pj.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Rodman, New York. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH MARSHALL, born at 
Hopkinton, Rhode Island, 1759; died at Auburn, New 
York, 1844. He served in the war of the Revolution 
in 1775, and in the early part of 1777 from Rhode Is- 
land. In the latter part of 1777 and 1779 ^^ served 
from Connecticut. He was a pensioner. 



38i 

HUNTER, ORANGE DWIGHT. 

(No. 1 107. Admitted Feb. 22, iSpd.J Of Terry ville, 
Connecticut; foundry man ; born at Wendell, Massa- 
chusetts, 

Grandson of DAVID HUNTER (1756-1823), of New 
Braintree, Massachusetts, who was a fifer in the com- 
pany of Captain John Granger, in the regiment of 
Colonel Learned, from May i to August i, 1775. He 
also served as Corporal for three days in the company 
of Captain Thomas Whipple, under Colonel James 
Converse, on the alarm to Providence in July, 1777. 

♦HUNTINGTON, AUSTIN. (No. 667. Admitted March 
26, 1 8^2.) Of Norwich, Connecticut; importer; born 
at Chicago, Illinois. Died November 23, 1893. 

Great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTINGTON. 
\^See Year Book., 18^3-4, pp. ipi, 434.] 

HUNTINGTON, CHARLES WESLEY. 

(No. 604. Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; professor of music; born at New London, 
Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN HUNTINGTON {iU9 ), 

who marched from Tolland in the Lexington alarm 
in the company commanded by Captain Solomon 
Willes, in April, 1775. In May of the same year, un- 
der the same Captain, he was a member of General 
Joseph Spencer's regiment, which was posted at Rox- 
bury. Detachments of officers and men of this regi- 
ment were engaged in the battle of Bunker Hill, June 
17th, and in Arnold's Quebec expedition, September- 
December, 1775. 

HUNTINGTON, JOHN TAYLOR. 

(No. 68. Admitted April 18, i88p.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at New Milford, Connecti- 
cut. 
26 



382 

Great-grandson of Reverend ENOCH HUNTING- 
TON. \^See Hulbert, George Huntington.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of the Reverend NA- 
THANIEL TA YLOR, of New Milford, pastor of the 
Congregational church during the Revolutionary war. 
He was a zealous advocate of the revolution, and 
remitted one year's salary for its support, as parish 
records show in his own handwriting, April, 1779. 

*HUNTINGTON, JOSEPH LAWSON WEATHERLY. 
(No. J55. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Washington, 
District of Columbia; clerk in government depart- 
ment; born at Franklin, Connecticut. Died December 
— , 1893. 

Great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTINGTON. 
Also, great-grandson of ANDREW HUNTING- 
TON. \^See Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. ipi, 4JI.] 

HUNTINGTON, ROBERT WATKINSON. 

(No. 633. Admitted March 26, 1 8g2.) Of Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia; officer United States marine corps; born at 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of HENRY CHAMPION, Sr. 
\See Gilbert, Charles Edwin.] 

Also, great-grandson of HENRY CHAMPION, Jr., 
of Colchester, Connecticut (1751-1836). He entered 
the army as Ensign, and became successively, by pro- 
motion, 2d Lieutenant, Lieutenant, Adjutant, Captain, 
and Brigade-Major. He was a brave, efficient officer 
at the battle of Bunker Hill; and he led the ist bat- 
talion, Connecticut light infantry, in the storming and 
capture of Stony Point, receiving honorable mention 
by General Wayne in his message to Congress for 
personal bravery in that action. 

HUNTINGTON, ROBERT WATKINSON, Jr. 

(No. 13J. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; insurance clerk; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 



3^3 

Great-great-great-grandson of JON A THAN TRUM- 
BULL. \^See Bull, William Lanman.'] 

HUNTINGTON, WILLIAM HUNTER. 

(No. 288. Admitted March 28, i8po.) Of Newport, 
Rhode Island; pharmacist United States navy; born 
at South Abington, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of J ED ED L AH HUNTINGTON. 
l^See Chappell, Alfred Hebard.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTING- 
TON. l^See Bond, William Williams^ 

HURLBUTT, JOHN BELDEN. 
(No. ^60. Admitted Sept. 75, i8pi.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Redding, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL HURLBUTT, who 
was a Corporal in Captain Samuel Comstock's com- 
pany of the 9th regiment, Connecticut militia, in active 
service in New York in August and September, 1776. 
He was also a Lieutenant in Captain Nathan Gilbert's 
company, in Colonel John Mead's regiment of Con- 
necticut militia, at Fishkill in 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN GREGORY, Si 
member of Captain Ozias Marvin's company, in the 
9th regiment, Connecticut militia, at New York, in 
August and September, 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH OGDEN, a Ser- 
geant in the 5 th regiment, Connecticut line, formation 
of 1777-81, commanded by Colonel Philip Burr Brad- 
ley. This regiment was engaged in the battle of 
Germantown, 1777, and wintered at Valley Forge, 
1777-78. 

HYDE, BURRELL WOODWORTH. 

(No. 4^1. Admitted Eeb. 18, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Franklin, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of HEZEKIAH TRACY, ySee Hale, 
Almarin Tracy.^ 



384 

Also, great-grandson oi JACOB HAZEN (1753-18—), 
of Franklin, Connecticut, a member of Captain Brews- 
ter's company, Colonel Huntington's regiment, 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of ANDREW HYDE, a Revo- 
lutionary pensioner, 1832. 

HYDE, FRANK ELDRIDGE. 

(No. 7q8. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^3.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Tolland, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIJAH AVERY. \^See 
Eldridge^ James William?^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of Ensign CHARLES 
ELDRIDGE. \^See Eldridge, James William.'] 

HYDE, FREDERIC BULKLEY. 

(No. lo^i. Admitted May 10, i8q^.) Of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; student; born at New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of JAMES HYDE (1752-1809), of 
Norwich, Connecticut, who was an Ensign and Ser- 
geant in the 4th regiment, Connecticut line, from 1777 
to 1 78 1, went into camp at Peekskill in 1777, and in 
September was ordered to Washington's army in 
Pennsylvania, being assigned to the brigade of Gen- 
eral MacDougal; was engaged in the battle of Ger- 
mantown, October 4, 1777, and later assigned to Var- 
num's brigade and assisted at the defense of Fort 
Mifflin, on the Delaware; wintered at Valley Forge, 
1777-78, and in June following was at the battle of 
Monmouth, Colonel Durkee then commanding the 
brigade; encamped at White Plains and at Reading in 
the winter of 1778-79; in 1779 was on the Hudson 
and took part in the storming of Stony Point; win- 
tered at Morristown, 1779-80, and in 1780 and 1781 
at Connecticut Valley. On the formation of 1781-83 
he was a Lieutenant in the company of Captain Eells 
in the ist regiment, Connecticut line, under Colonel 
John Durkee. 



385 

Also, a descendant of ELEAZER BULKLEY. \^See 
Bulkley^ Benjamin Andrews^ 

HYDE, THEOPHILUS RODGERS, Jr. 

(No. 1108. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Stonington, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of PHINEAS HYDE (1749-1820), 
of Norwich, Connecticut, who served as Sergeant's 
mate on the frigate "Confederacy." He was a pen- 
sioner. 

HYDE, WILLIAM WALDO. 

(No. 232. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Tolland, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIJAH AVERY. \^See 
Eldridge^ James William^ 

Also, great -great- grandson of Ensign CHARLES 
ELDRIDGE. \^See Eldridge, James Wiiliam.l 

INGALLS, PHINEAS HENRY. 

(No. ^os. Admitted May 28^ i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Gorham, Cumberland 
County, Maine. 

Grandson of PHINEAS INGALLS, of Massachu- 
setts (1757-1843), who turned out April 19, 1775, and 
marched through Lexington to Cambridge. On the 
reorganization of the army for the siege of Boston, he 
enlisted for eight months in the company commanded 
by Captain Benjamin Varnum, in the regiment of Col- 
onel Frye, stationed at Cambridge. From July, 1776, 
he served four months in the company of Captain 
Samuel Johnson, under Colonel Edward Wigglesworth, 
on Lake Champlain. In March, 1777, he volunteered 
for three years as an artificer in a regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin. He was with 
the army at the battle of Brandywine, and at the 
battle of Germantown. 



386 

IVES, EDWARD RILEY. 

{No. pji. Admitted Jan. i6, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Plymouth, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson oi ELNATHAN IVES (1749-1841), 
of Wallingford, Connecticut, who marched from Wal- 
lingford for the relief of Boston in the Lexington 
alarm, April, 1775. 

IVES, FRANCIS JOSEPH. 

{No. g66. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4) Of St. Augustine, 
Florida; Captain medical department U. S. army; born 
at Boston, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of ASAHEL IVES (1764-1830), of 
Woodbury, Connecticut, who served as a private in 
the 13th regiment, Connecticut militia, commanded 
by Colonel Benjamin Hinman, and afterwards by 
Colonel Increase Moseley. From September 16 to 
December 12, 1780, he served in the 8th regiment, Con- 
necticut line, under Colonel John Chandler. 

IVES, HARRY CANDEE. 

(No. gj2. Admitted Jan. 16, i8g4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Plymouth, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELNATHAN IVES. ^See 
Ives^ Edward Riley ^ 

Also, great-great-grandson oi JOSEPH MAN S- 
EIELD (1737-182 1 ), of New Haven, Connecticut, who 
was a member of the loth company, under Captain 
Eli Leavenworth, of the 7th Connecticut regiment, 
commanded by Colonel Charles Webb, and served 
from July 10 to December 20, 1775. In 1776 he served 
as ist Lieutenant of the 5th company under Captain 
J. Prentiss of the 5th battalion, Wadsworth's brigade, 
commanded by Colonel Douglas. From January i, 
1777, to May 10, 1780, he was a Captain in the 5th 
regiment, Connecticut line. He was a pensioner. 



387 

IVES, (MRS.) JANE MARIA BLAKESLEE. 

(No. pjj. Admitted Jan. i6, 18^4.) Wife of Edward 
Riley Ives, of Bridgeport, Connecticut; born at Ply- 
mouth, Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of Captain JOSEPH MANS- 
FIELD. \^See IveSy Harry Candeei\ 

IVES, JOHN. 

(No. pog. Admitted April ly, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Meriden. 

Grandson of NATHANIEL YALE, of Meriden, Con- 
necticut (1753-1814), a private soldier, who enlisted 
June 24, 1776, in Captain Couch's company; he was at 
the defense of Fort Washington, but^escaped capture, 
having previously been sent to the west bank of the 
river to work upon some barracks; he was discharged 
January 19, 1777. 

IVES, LELAND HOWARD. 
(No. gio. Admitted Apr. 77, 18Q4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL YALE. ^See Ives, 
John.^ 

JACKSON, FREDERICK AUGUSTUS. 

(No. 10^2. Admitted Dec. 16, i8g^.) Of West Haven, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper and cashier; born at Strat- 
ford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL JACKSON (1763- 
1841), of Stratford, Connecticut, who enlisted in the 
spring of 1778, in the company of Captain Yates of 
Stratford, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Roger Enos. In the spring of 1779 he enlisted in the 
company of Captain David Olmsted of Ridgefield, in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Bezaleel Beebe, 
and served nine months. In February, 1782, he en- 
listed in the company of Captain Joseph Walker, in 



388 

the regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel B. Webb, 
and served to the close of the war. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

JAMES, HOWARD K. 

(No. Q67. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of San Francisco, 
California, lately Rockville, Connecticut; law student; 
born at East Windsor, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of CALEB LEAVITT (1730- 
1810), of Hingham, Massachusetts, who served as a 
Corporal in an independent company commanded by 
Captain James Lincoln from May, 1775, to January, 
1776, the company being stationed as a garrison force 
at Broad Cove, Hingham, during the siege of Boston. 
In January, 1776, he was promoted to 2d and ist Lieu- 
tenant in the same company. In 1778 he served three 
months in the company commanded by Captain Elias 
Whitten, under Colonel Lyman, at Dorchester Heights. 

Also, great-grandson of CALEB LEA VLTT, 2d, who 
served as a private from January to July, 1776, in the 
company of Captain Lincoln, in which his father was 
then Lieutenant. 

JENNINGS, JAMES HENRY. 

(JVo. nop. Admitted Feb. j, i8(p6.) Of Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia; topographer U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey; born at Coventry, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of AARON JENNLNGS (1762- 
1839), of Fairfield, Connecticut, who in the spring of 
1779, enlisted from Green's Farms for nine months, 
under Captain Joseph Bennett, and was stationed as 
a coast guard in Fairfield. He was on duty when the 
British landed and burned the town. He was also on 
duty in 1780-81-82, in Colonel Dimon's regiment. 

JENNINGS, JOHN JOSEPH. 

(No. 583. Adtnitted Oct. 14, i8pi.) Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Bridgeport, Connecticut. 



389 

Great grandson of AARON JENNINGS. {See Jen- 
nings, James Henry ^ 

JEWELL, CHARLES ALEXANDER. 

(No. 306. Admitted April 75, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Winchester, New 
Hampshire. 

Great-grandson of MOSES CHAMBERLAIN, of 
Winchester, New Hampshire, ist Lieutenant in the 
New Hampshire regiment commanded by Colonel 
Timothy Bedel, raised for the defense of the frontier 
on the Connecticut river, from April i, 1778, to April 
I, 1779- 

JEWELL, LYMAN BEECHER. 

(No. JOS. Admitted April i^, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; vice-president Jewell Belting company. 

Great-grandson of MOSES CHAMBERLAIN. \^See 
Jewell, Charles Alexander^ 

JEWELL, PLINY. 

(No. 307. Admitted April IS, 1 8^0.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president Jewell Belting company. 

Great-grandson of MOSES CHAMBERLAIN. ySee 
Jewell., Charles Alexander?^ 

^JOHNSON, AHOLIAB. 

(No. s6i. Admitted Sept. z^, i8gi.) Of Enfield, Connecti- 
cut; born at Stafford, Connecticut. Died March 3, 
1893. 

Son of AHOLIAB JOHNSON. 

Also, great-grandson of JOHN JOHNSON. ^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. 2p2, 41S.] 

JOHNSON, CHARLES COIT. 

(No. 113. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; president of the Norwich Gas company; born 
at Jewett City, Connecticut. 



390 

Great-grandson of OBADIAH JOHNSON, of Can- 
terbury, Connecticut, in 1775 Major of the 3d Con- 
necticut regiment, Israel Putnam Colonel. This 
regiment was stationed, during the siege of Boston, at 
Cambridge, and a detachment of officers and men was 
engaged at Bunker Hill. In 1776 he was Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the regiment commanded by Colonel An- 
drew Ward, which joined Washington's army at New 
York in August, and was stationed at first near Fort 
Lee, marched with the troops to White Plains, and 
subsequently into New Jersey. It took part in the 
battles of Trenton and Princeton, and encamped with 
Washington at Morristown. In 1777 he was appointed 
Colonel of the 21st regiment of Connecticut militia, 
and in 1778 commanded a Connecticut regiment in 
service in the state of Rhode Island. 

JOHNSON, JOSEPH WARREN. 

(No. ^62. Admitted Sept. z^, i8gi.) Of Enfield, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Somers, Connecticut. 

Grandson of AHOLIAB JOHNSON, Sr. (1762-1829), 
of Killingly, Connecticut, member of a company of 
cavalry in active service at New London after the in- 
vasion under Arnold. 

Also, great-grandson of JOHN JOHNSON (17— 
-1787), of Killingly, Connecticut, who served a three 
months' tour of duty at Fort Griswold during the 
Revolutionary war. 

JOHNSON, MARCUS MORTON. 

(No. 630. Admitted Feb. 13, 18^2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician and surgeon; born at Malone, New 
York. 

Great-grandson of JOSHUA CHAPMAN (1755- 
1837), who, in the month of April, 1775, entered the 
service from West Springfield, Massachusetts, in Cap- 
tain Enoch Chapin's company of the Massachusetts 
regiment commanded by Colonel William Danielson. 



391 

The family tradition runs that he participated in 
many engagements with the enemy, and was present 
at the surrender of Burgoyne. 

JONES, CLARENCE EDWARD. 

(No. 316. Admitted April 75, i8qo.) Of New Hartford, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at New Hartford. 

Great-grandson of BENONI JONES, of Bark- 
hamsted, Connecticut, a private in the company com- 
manded by Ensign John Norton, in the i8th regiment 
of Connecticut militia, at New York in 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH SHEPARD, Jr., 
who marched with the New Hartford company for 
the relief of Boston in the Lexington alarm. 

JONES, HENRY ROGER. 

(No. 21. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of New Hartford, 
Connecticut; of the United States army, retired; born 
at New Hartford. 

Grandson of ISRAEL JONES, of Barkhamsted, 
Connecticut (1753-1812), Sergeant in Captain John 
Watson's company, of Colonel Benjamin Hinman's 
regiment, in 1775; Ensign in the 7th regiment, Con- 
necticut line, in 1777; 2d Lieutenant in 1778, and in 
the same year, Captain in the i8th regiment, Con- 
necticut militia. He fought at Germantown, October 
4, 1777; wintered at Valley Forge, 1777-78, and was in 
the battle of Monmouth Court House, June, 1778. 
Also, great-grandson of PHINEAS MERRILL, of 

New Hartford, Connecticut (1755 ), who served in 

the 8th company of Colonel Charles Webb's regiment, 
from July to December, 1775, and on the staff of Com- 
missary-General Wadsworth as conductor of trains, 
with the rank of Captain, 1777-79. 

JONES, WALTER CLINTON. 

' (No. 612. Admitted Jan. 18, i8p2.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; investment broker; born at Summit, New 
Jersey. 



392 

Great-great-grandson of JAMES CLINTON (1736- 
1812), who was appointed Colonel of the 3d New York 
regiment June 30, 1775, and accompanied Montgomery 
to Quebec. August 9, 1776, he was made Brigadier- 
General, and was in command at Fort Clinton when 
it was attacked, October, 1777, by the British under 
Sir Henry Clinton. Although the attacking force was 
many times larger than his own, he made a gallant 
defense, and refused to surrender. The fort was car- 
ried by storm at the point of the bayonet. He was 
the last to leave the works, and severely wounded, but 
he succeeded in escaping to the mountains. He co- 
operated with General vSullivan in a successful expedi- 
tion against the Indians, in 1779. He was in command 
at Albany during a great part of the war, and was 
present at the siege of Yorktown, and at the evacu- 
ation of New York by the British. He was a member 
of the New York convention that ratified the Consti- 
tution of the United States. 

Also, great -great -great-grandson of PHILIP 
SCHUYLER (i 733-1804), who was in active service, 
and had attained the rank of Major, during the French 
and Indian war, and after the peace of 1763 had been 
Colonel of militia. New York sent him to the Conti- 
nental Congress in 1775, and in June of that year that 
body appointed him Major-General, and assigned him 
to the command of the northern department. He at 
once engaged in organizing an army for the invasion 
of Canada. The advance of the American forces was 
made in September, but ill health compelled him to 
turn over the immediate command of operations in the 
field to General Montgomery. In January, 1776, he 
personally commanded the troops which suppressed 
the tory rising in Tryon county. New York, under Sir 
John Johnson. He was also chairman of the board of 
commissioners for Indian affairs, and in this capacity 
his influence with the Indian tribes was of great ser- 
vice to the American cause. After the evacuation of 



393 

Canada by the American forces, in 1776, he was em- 
ployed in raising men and gathering supplies to resist 
the further advance of the British. In 1777, he was 
again in Congress and appointed Commander-in-Chief 
of the military of the state of Pennsylvania, but in 
June of that year he returned to the command of the 
northern department His health was better than it 
had been for two years, and he performed a prodigious 
amount of labor in preparation for the defense of his 
department against the powerful army coming down 
from the north under Burgoyne. Overwhelming force 
compelled the evacuation of Ticonderoga, and the 
Americans, inferior in numbers and inferior in disci- 
pline, were compelled to retreat toward Albany. Gen- 
eral Schuyler promptly and thoroughly stripped the 
country of food and forage. He sent a force to resist 
and defeat St. Leger, advancing through the valley of 
the Mohawk, and his strategy rendered the victory of 
Bennington possible. But the loss of Ticonderoga and 
the disheartening effect of the retreat of the army, 
raised a public clamor for his removal. On the 19th 
of August, 1777, when Burgoyne's army was ready to 
drop into his hands, he was relieved of command by 
General Gates. "His plans were well laid, and the 
crown of victory was clearly within his reach, when 
another stepped into his place, who, to secure the prize 
had only to stand still and wait the onward tide of 
events." — [fared SparksJ] His resignation from the 
army was accepted by Congress April 19, 1779, and in 
that year he was again a member of that body. From 
the beginning of the war he was the friend and trusted 
counselor of Washington. He steadily advocated the 
consolidation of the Union "as the first of political 
blessings, and labored in the very front of the enlight- 
ened men of that day in appeasing local jealousies and 
state pride, then the greatest obstacles to political 
reform." He represented the state of New York in 
the Senate in 1789-91, and was again chosen to that 
body in 1797. 



394 

JOSLYN, (MRS.) MINNIE BROWN. 

(No. 2'j6. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Wife of Charles 
M. Joslyn, of Hartford, Connecticut; born at Stafford, 
Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of OTHNIEL BROWN. ySee 
Brown, Freeman Monroe.^ 

JUDD, GEORGE EDWARDS. 

(No. 84g. Admitted Jan. i6, i8g4.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of ELEZER GREEN (1757-1833), 
who served in Captain Chapman's company, 9th regi- 
ment, Connecticut militia, from January 8 to March i, 

1778. 

JUDSON, STILES. 

(No. 20p. Admitted Feb. J/, i8go.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Stratford. 

Grandson of STILES JUDSON, of Stratford, Con- 
necticut (1752 ). He was in the Revolutionary 

army at New York when the city was taken by the 
British forces; and in 1779 commanded a company of 
militia which turned out to repel the invasion under 
Tryon. 

JUDSON, STILES, Jr. 

(No. s^4- Admitted Oct. 14, i8pi.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Stratford. 

Great-grandson of STILES JUDSON. \_See Judson, 
Stiles.'] 

KEELER, CHARLES BRADLEY. 

(N'o. 1020. Admitted May 10, i8p^.) Of New Canaan, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut. 



395 

Great-grandson of ISAAC KEELER (1756-1837), of 
Canaan Parish, Connecticut, who in 1775 was a mem- 
ber of the 4th company, Captain Joseph Hoit (Hoyt), 
of the 7th Connecticut regiment, commanded by Col- 
onel Charles Webb of Stamford, serving at Winter 
Hill under General Sullivan. On January i, 1777, he 
was commissioned Ensign in the 2d regiment, forma- 
tion of 1777-1780. On February 4, 1778, he was com- 
missioned 2d Lieutenant; on August i, 1779, ist Lieu- 
tenant, and Quartermaster in 1781, He was at Valley 
Forge in 1777-78, and afterwards at the battle of Mon- 
mouth. He was a pensioner, and a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. 

KEEP, HOWARD HENRY. 

(No. 850. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance clerk; born at Longmeadow, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL KEEP, of Long- 
meadow, Massachusetts (i 739-1823), a Sergeant in the 
Longmeadow Minutemen, who left for Boston, April 
21, 1775- 

KEEP, ROBERT PORTER. 

(No. 426. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; principal of the Norwich Free Academy; 
born at Farmington, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL KEEP. {See Keep, 
Howard Henry ^ 

KEIGWIN, HENRY WEBSTER. 

(No. yp^. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; teacher; born at Griswold, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NICHOLAS KEIGWIN, of Vol- 
untown, Connecticut (1736-7-1813), Lieutenant of the 
3d company of the alarm list of the 21st Connecticut 
regiment. 



39^ 

*KELLOGG, ALLYN STANLEY. 

(No. 130. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Newtonville, 
Massachusetts; born at Vernon, Connecticut. Died 
April 3, 1893. 

Great-great-grandson of JON A THAN HALE. \^See 
Year Book, i8gj-4, pp. 2g8, 41/.] 

KELLOGG, CHARLES POOLE. 
(No. mo. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the State Board of Charities; 
born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of JACOB POOLE {lUS- 
1776), of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, who was a Lieu- 
tenant in a Massachusetts regiment which he assisted 
in raising, and served under General Arnold in the 
expedition against Quebec. He died at St. Terrace, 
June 13, 1776, from smallpox contracted in service. A 
tombstone was erected to his memory in the church- 
yard at Shelburne, Massachusetts, on which is the 
following inscription: 

" By means of war my soul from earth has fled, 
My body lodged in mansions of the dead." 

Also, great-great-grandson of TLTUS HOSMER 
(1737-1780), of Middletown, Connecticut, who grad- 
uated from Yale college in 1757, and was a represen- 
tative in the General Assembly from Middletown, from 
October, 1773, until May, 1778. In 1777 he was speaker 
of the House, and exerted great influence in promot- 
ing the adoption of vigorous measures for prosecut- 
ing the war. He was also a member of the council of 
safety, and in 1778 was a member of the Continental 
Congress. In January, 1780, when the plan was ma- 
tured by Congress for establishing a court of appeals, 
principally for the revision of maritime and admiralty 
cases, he was elected one of the three judges. 



397 

KELLOGG, EDWARD WILBERFORCE. 
(No. 4'/8. Adfnitted Apr. 21, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Avon, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN BARTLETT (1754-1831), 
of Lebanon, Connecticut, a participant in the battle of 
Bunker Hill, and subsequently a private soldier in the 
2d company of the 8th Connecticut regiment. 

*KELLOGG, (MRS.) ELIZA NOBLE. 

(No. 'JOS. Admitted May 16, 18^2. Of Rock vi lie, Con- 
necticiit; born at Middletown, Connecticut. Died Sep- 
tember 21, 1892. 

Daughter of GIDEON NOBLE. \^See Year Book, 
1893-4, pp. 2p8,4ii.'\ 

KELLOGG, JOHN P. 
(No. 4p. Admitted Apr. 22, i88g.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL HOLD EN 
PARSONS, of New London, Connecticut (i 737-1 789) 
who responded to the Lexington alarm, and was com- 
missioned, May I, 1775, Colonel of the 6th regiment. 
He was one of the gentlemen who, on their individual 
notes, procured money from the treasury to support 
the expedition, under Captains Mott and Phelps, for 
the taking of Ticonderoga, 1775. In 1776 he was ap- 
pointed Colonel of the loth Continental regiment, and 
marched with the army from Boston to New York in 
April, 1776. August 9th he was made Brigadier-Gen- 
eral in the Continental army. Ordered to the Brook- 
lyn front August 24th, he engaged in the battle of the 
27th, and narrowly escaped capture, being field officer 
for the day. On the retreat from New York, Septem- 
ber 15th, his brigade was swept along in the panic to 
Harlem Heights. After White Plains, he remained 
with the troops east of the Hudson. In the move- 
ments of 1779 he served in the left wing of the army 
27 



398 

east of the Hudson under General Heath. His brigade 
assisted in repelling the enemy on the Connecticut 
coast in July. In command of a Connecticut division 
in November, 1779, he conducted it to winter quarters 
in Morristown, New Jersey. In 1780 he served both 
as brigade and division commander in the main army, 
and was a member of the court that tried Andre in 
September. He was made Major-General in the Con- 
tinental army October 23, 1780, and retired from the 
field on account of ill health, April, 1782. 

[^See Address by General Kellogg^ p. 136^ and Defense of 
General Parsons^ by Joseph G. Woodward^ p. 188?^ 



KELLOGG, (MRS.) LUCIA HOSMER ANDREWS. 
(No. mi. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8p6.) Wife of Stephen 
W. Kellogg of Waterbury, Connecticut; born at 

' Buffalo, New York. 

Great-granddaughter of GENERAL SAMUEL 
HOLDEN PARSONS. \^See Kellogg, John Z'.] 

KELLOGG, STEPHEN WRIGHT. 

(No. 56. Admitted Apr. 23, i88g.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; lawyer. 

Grandson: of STEPHEN WRLGHT, of Ludlow, 

Vermont (1764 ), a soldier in the Revolution at 

the age of sixteen, and subsequently a pensioner. 

Also, great-grandson of JACOB POOLE. {See 
Kellogg, Charles Poole.'] 

KELLOGG, WILLIAM WILLIAMS. 

(No. 1112. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Mystic, Con- 
necticut; mechanic; born at Stonington, Connecticut. 



399 

Great-grandson of DAVID KELLOGG (17 T776), 

of Stonington, Connecticut, who was a member of the 
company of Captain Jonathan Brewster in the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington at 
the siege of Boston, where he was taken with fever 
and died. 

KENYON, CHARLES HENRY. 

(No, 10^3. Admitted Sept. 16, 18^^.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; student; born at Norwich. 

Great-grandson of ELIJAH KENYON (y^<,()-iZo6)^ 
of Charleston, Rhode Island, who served as a private 
in the company of Captain Amos Green, in the Rhode 
Island regiment commanded by Colonel Joseph Noyes, 
and performed short tours of guard duty as required. 
His widow received a pension. 

KIMBERLY, ENOS SPERRY. 

(No. 4S2. Admitted Eeb. 18, i8pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; coal merchant; born at Westville, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of EZRA KIMBERLY (1764-1844), who 
enlisted when he was 18 years old. 

*KINGSLEY, WILLIAM THOMAS. 

(No. 706. Admitted Oct. 18, 1892.) Of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; born at New York city. Died June 3, 
1893. 

Great-grandson of SILAS HARTSHORN. 

Also, great-grandson of ALPHEUS KINGSLEY. 
ySee Year Book^ 18^3-4^ pp. 300, 422.'] 

*KINNEY, JOHN CODDINGTON. 

(No. 13. Admitted April 2, i88p.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; journalist; born at Nassau, New York. Died 
April 22, 1891. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL EI TZ- RAN- 
DOLPH. 



400 

Also, great-grandson of EZRA KINE. 
Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH BOARDMAN. 
\See Year Book^ iSgi, pp. 134, 2op.] 

KIRKHAM, JOHN STODDARD. 

(JVo. 2yj. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Newington, 
Connecticut; farmer; born at Newington. 

Grandson of JOHN KIRKHAM, of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut (1760 ), a fifer in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Samuel B. Webb, 1777-81. He re- 
mained with the regiment when reformed in 1781 as 
the 3d regiment of the Connecticut line, and became 
fife-major November 14, 1781. 

*KISSAM, DANIEL WHITEHEAD. 

(No. 1^6. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at New York city. Died 
August 22, 1895. 

Grandson of JONAS ADDOMS. ^See Year Book, 
18^3-4, p. 301, and obituary, Year Book, 18^^-6.] 

KNIGHT, WILLIAM WARD. 

(No. 755. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Chaplin, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSEPH WOODWARD, 
of Ashford, Connecticut (17 26-1814), serving with the 
army before Boston, probably as Captain, when that 
city was evacuated by the British forces, March, 1776. 




40I 

LACEY, ROWLAND BRADLEY. 

(No. ip. Admitted April 2, i88p.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; born at Easton, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ZACHARIAH LACEY (1754-1837), of 
Fairfield and Easton, Connecticut, a private soldier 
and non-commissioned officer for four years (1776-80). 
He was in the command of General Silliman when 
the American army evacuated New York, and came 
near being taken prisoner, and he was with the army 
at Harlem Heights and White Plains. When Tryon 
invaded Connecticut, 1779, he took part in the defense 
of the state, and was in the engagement at Ridgefield. 

LAMB, CHARLES HENRY. 

(No. g68. Admitted Feb. 11, i8g^.) Of Danbury, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Danbury. 

Great-great-grandson of DANIEL HICKOK (1748- 
1835), of Bethel, Connecticut, who raised a company in 
1776 to serve for one year. He was discharged in Sep- 
tember or October, 1776, having been taken with small- 
pox. He was also Captain of a militia company which 
turned out to repel Tryon's invasion in July, 1779. 

LAMBERT, EDWARD RICHARD. 
(No. JS7- Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; architect; born at Milford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JEREMIAH BULL, oi Milford, 
Connecticut (1757-1832), who served in 1775, i^ the 
loth company of the ist Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by General Wooster. He was also Corporal 
in Captain Samuel Peck's company, in Washington's 
army on Long Island, and in New York, 1776. He was 
promoted to ist Sergeant, and was at Trenton and at 
Yorktown. 

Also, great-grandson of DAVID LAMBERT {i^^i- 
1815), who enlisted in Captain Bryan's company in 
1 77 7> to go to Peekskill, New York. 



402 

LANDERS, CHARLES SMITH. 

(No. 4^9- Admitted April 21, 1891.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at New Britain. 

Great-grandson of ASAEL LANDERS {i^6G-i2>^2). 
He enlisted at Lenox, Massachusetts, in April, 1782, 
in the 5th Massachusetts regiment. He was after- 
wards transferred to the ist regiment. 

LANDERS, GEORGE MARCELLUS, Jr. 

(No. 8^1. Admitted Sept. 12, 1893.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at New Britain. 

Great-great-grandson of ASAEL LANDERS. S^See 
Landers^ Charles Smithy 

LANMAN, CHARLES ROCKWELL. 

(No. ^43. Admitted June 2p, i8gi.) Of Cambridge, 
Massachusetts; professor in Harvard University; 
born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Great -great -grandson of JONATHAN TRUM- 
BULL. \^See Bull, William Lanman.^ 

LANMAN, WILLIAM CAMP. 
(No. 161. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Norwich. 

Great -great -grandson of JONATHAN TRUM- 
BULL. YSee Bull, Williajn Lanman.'] 

LATHAM, DANIEL. 
(No. 1113. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New London. 

Great-great-great-grandson of MOSES WARREN. 
\^See Chapman, Dwight.^ 

LATHROP, GEORGE PARSONS. 
(No. 66s . Admitted Feb. 13, i8g2.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; author; born at Oahu, Hawaiian Islands. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL HOLDEN PARSONS 
ISee Kellogg, John F?^ 



403 

LATHROP, HENRY CLINTON. 
(No. 315. Admitted April 13, i8go.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; banker; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL GRAY, of Windham, 

Connecticut (175 1 ), appointed by Congress, 

August 6, 1777, a 2d Deputy Commissary-General of 
purchases for the eastern department, and continued 
until 1780. 



^^..^^c^^^^ 



Also, great-great-grandson of JEDEDIAH ELDER- 
KIN {\'ii%-\']():^, of Windham, Connecticut, who ren- 
dered extensive and valuable services during the war 
in a variety of capacities. He was promoted from 
Major to be Lieutenant-Colonel of the 5th regiment 
of militia, to succeed Colonel Dyer, in October, 1774, 
and in March, 1775, he was promoted to be Colonel of 
the same regiment. He was afterwards commissioned 
a Brigadier-General of militia. He was a member of 
the General Assembly from Windham in 1774, 1775, 
1776, 1779 and 1780, and a member of the Council of 
Safety from 1775 to 1779, during which period he 
served on special committees, and was appointed to 
perform special services a number of times. He 
served as a member of a board of engineers at New 
London in 1775 and 1776, He was also, during the 
war, in company with Nathaniel Wales, a manufac- 
turer and custodian of powder for the state, which he 
distributed from time to time, as directed by the 
Council of Safety. 

Also, great-great-grandson of NA THAN I EL WEBB 
(1737-1814), of Windham, Connecticut. Early in 1776 
he served as Adjutant in the regiment of Colonel John 
Douglas, which formed a part of the army before 
Boston at the time of its evacuation by the British 
forces. September 7th of the same year he was ap- 



404 

pointed Adjutant of the 20th Continental, Colonel 
Durkee's regiment. This regiment was engaged in 
the battle of Trenton, December 25, 1776. He was 
commissioned Captain in the 4th regiment, Connecti- 
cut line, January i, 1777. This regiment was engaged 
in the battle of Germantown, October 4, 1777. It win- 
tered at Valley Forge the following winter, and in 
June, 1778, participated in the battle of Monmouth. 
In the summer of 1779 he was assigned to Wayne's 
light infantry corps, after the capture of Stony Point. 
From this time he remained generally in the High- 
lands, until January i, 1781, when, upon the consoli- 
dation of regiments, he retired from the army. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WA TERM AN CLIFT, 
of Plainfield, Connecticut (i 738-1828), Captain of the 
6th company in the 6th Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Samuel Holden Parsons, raised on 
the first call for troops in April-May, 1775. The fol- 
lowing year he served as Major of the 4th battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade, commanded by Colonel Samuel 
Selden. This battalion participated in the battle of 
Long Island, in the retreat from New York when the 
city was abandoned, and was present with the army 
until December 25, 1776, when the term of the regi- 
ment expired, 

LEARNED, BELA PECK. 

(No. 341. Admitted June 5, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Norwich. 

Great-grandson of BELA PECK. \^See Rowland, 
Harriet Margaret Learned.'\ 

LEARNED, HORACE COIT. 

(No. 631. Admitted Feb. 13, i8g2.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; insurance; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of /6> 6" iT^^ COIT. [See Coit, 
Alfred.'] 



40S 

LEARNED, WALTER. 

(No. 632. Admitted Feb. 13, 18^2.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; assistant treasurer of the Saving's Bank 
of New London; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of JOSHUA COIT. [See Coi't, Alfred.] 



LEAVENS, FRANCIS JEDEDIAH. 

(JVo. 342. Admitted June 5, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Norwich. 

Grandson of JEDEDIAH LEA VENS, of Killingly, 

Connecticut (1755 ), a private soldier in Captain 

Joseph Cady's company of the nth regiment of Con- 
necticut militia, commanded by Colonel Ebenezer Wil- 
liams, which served in the campaign around New York 
in 1776. 

LEE, V/ILLIAM WALLACE. 

(No. 64. Admitted Aug. 21, i88q.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; machinist; born at Barkhamsted, Connecticut. 

Grandson of DAVID LEE (1763-1842), of Farming- 
ton, Connecticut, a private in the regiment of Colonel 
Zebulon Butler. He was in service in New Jersey, 
and along the Hudson in 1780. 

Also, great-grandson of ELIHU CRANE, of Kil- 
lingworth, Connecticut, a private soldier in Captain 
Nathaniel Edwards* company. General Waterbury's 
state brigade, 1781. 

Also, grandson of JOSEPH SOMERS, of Milford, 
Connecticut, a private in the company of militia com- 
manded by Caleb Mix, in Colonel Moseley's regiment, 
ordered to the Hudson after the battle of Monmouth, 
June 28, 1778. 

Also, great-grandson of ANDREW HAYS (17— 
-181 2), of Simsbury, Connecticut, a private in Captain 
Theodore Woodbridge's company in the 7th regiment, 
Connecticut line, formation of 1777-81. 



4o6 

LEE, WILSON HORATIO. 

(No. 5<?5. Admitted Oct. 14, i8qi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut ; publisher ; born at Hardwick, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of SIMEON FISH, of Men- 
don, Massachusetts, a Corporal in service in 1775. 

Also, great-grandson of JONATHAN LEE (1759- 
'^'^Z^i of Concord, Massachusetts, who enlisted Sep- 
tember 27, 1777, in the company of Captain John But- 
tricks, of Concord, in the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Reade, detached from the regiment of Colonel 
Brooks to reinforce General Gates at the northward, 
and served until November 7, 1777. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WO OBIS LEE (1719- 
1799), of Concord, Massachusetts, who served in the 
company of Captain Abijah Brown, at Nantasket, and 
again under Captain Hartwell at Boston, and was in a 
company present at the capture of Burgoyne. 

LEEDS, JOHN HARRIS. 

(No. 6yo. Admitted April ip, iSp2.J Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Darien, Connecti- 
cut. 

Grandson of JOHN WEED, of Stamford, Connecti- 
cut (1756-1847), who, in 1776, joined Captain Sylvanus 
Brown's company, in Colonel John Chandler's Con- 
necticut regiment. In the year 1779 he was a member 
of Captain Stevens' company of the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Lamb. He was for five years in 
service. 

LEVI, HENRY BEACH. 

(No. y^S' Admitted Feb. 22, i8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Meriden. 

Great-great-grandson of JOHN COUCH. [See Couch, 
George Wine hell. ^ 



407 

LEWIS, CHARLES W. 
(No, 4^j. Admitted Feb. i8, i8^i.) Of Farmington, Con- 
necticut; born at Farmington. 

Great-grandson of ELIJAH LEWIS, of Farming- 
ton, Connecticut (1751-1834), Quartermaster in Col- 
onel Fisher Gay's regiment, 2d battalion, Wadsworth's 
brigade. 

LEWIS, HENRY JAMES. 
(No. pii. Admitted March 5, i8g4.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; oyster planter; born at Meriden, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JARED LEWIS, of Wallingford, 
Connecticut (1761-1826), a private soldier, who served 
in Lieutenant-Colonel Canfield's regiment at West 
Point, 1781. 

Also, great-grandson of DEODATE BEAUMONT, 
who served as a private soldier, and was a pensioner. 

*LEWIS, ISAAC CHAUNCEY. 

(No. 8^2. Admitted Feb. 22, ^8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Meriden. Died 
December 7, 1893. 

Grandson of JARED LEWIS. 

Also, grandson of DEODATE BEAUMONT ^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. 306, 432.] 

LEWIS, JOHN BENJAMIN. 

(No. JO. Admitted April j, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Greenport, New York. 

Great-grandson of ELEAZER LEWIS, of Hopkin- 
ton, Rhode Island {1737 ), a soldier in the Conti- 
nental army during the Revolutionary period. 

LEWIS, RUFUS WARREN. 

(No. 1054. Admitted Dec. 16, 18^5.) Of Naugatuck,, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Naugatuck. 



Great-grandson of JOSIAH ATKINS (i'] 1781), 

of Waterbury, Connecticut, who was in the service in 
1777, probably from September to November. He re- 
enlisted in January, 1781, for three years, leaving 
home in April, and joining the army at Highlands, 
New York, being attached to the company of Captain 
Selah Benton in the 5th regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Isaac Sherman. He served in the south under 
Generals Wayne and Lafayette, until October, 1781, 
when he obtained permission, on account of sickness, 
to return to New York. He entered a hospital at 
Williamsburg, Virginia, October 12, and died on 
October 26, 1781, Abstracts from a diary kept by him 
during his service are printed in the History of 
Waterbury, published in 1896 by Price & Lee Co., 
commencing on page 472. 

LINCOLN, CHARLES LEVI. 

(No.j2'j. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; iron manufacturer; born at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN MILES. ^See Felt, 
Levi Lincoln?^ 

Also, grandson of STEPHEN LINCOLN. \^See Felt, 
Levi Lincoln.] 

LINCOLN, CHARLES PAYSON. 

(No. 321. Admitted April 75, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; iron manufacturer; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of BENJAMIN MILES. \^See 
Felt, Levi Lincoln?^ 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN LINCOLN. 
S^See Felt, Levi Lincoln^ 

LINCOLN, FREDERICK MILES. 

(No. 262. Admitted March 2g, i8qo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; broker; born at Hartford. 



409 

Great-great-grandson of BENJAMIN MILES. S^See 
Felt, Levi Lincoln?) 

Also, great-grandson of SHARON PEASE. \^See 
Felt, Levi Lincoln.^ 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN LINCOLN. 
\^See Felt, Levi Lincoln.'] 

*LINCOLN, GEORGE STANLEY. 

(No. 244. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Boston, Massachusetts. Died April 
2, 1894. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN MILES. [See Year 
Book, i8g3-4, pp. 308, 426.] 

LINCOLN, THEODORE MILES. 

(No. 240. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of BENJAMIN MILES. ^See 
Felt, Levi Lincoln.] 

Also, great-grandson of STEPHEN LLNCOLN. 
\^See Felt, Levi Lincoln.] 

LINES, EDWIN STEVENS. 

(No. 756. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^3.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; clergyman; born at Naugatuck, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of ENOS BUNNELL, of Cheshire, 
Connecticut, a private soldier in the 9th company of 
the ist Connecticut regiment, commanded by Colonel 
David Wooster, 1775. This regiment marched to the 
northern department about September 20th, and took 
part in the operations along Lakes George and Cham- 
plain, and assisted in the reduction of St. Johns in 
October. 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA STEVENS, of 
Glastonbury, a member of Captain Jonathan Hale's 



4IO 

company in the regiment of Colonel Erastus Wolcott, 
which formed a part of the army that occupied Boston 
after its evacuation by the British, in March, 1776; and 
from February 11, 1777, a member of Captain Clark's 
company, in a regiment of artificers, and in service 
five years. He is said to have participated in the 
battle of Brandy wine and the battle of Monmouth, and 
to have been present at the capture of Cornwallis. 

Also, great-grandson of WALTER BOOTH. \^See 
Bevins, Le Grand.'] 

LINES, HENRY WALES. 

(No. 332. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; building contractor; born at Naugatuck, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of ENOS BUNNELL. ^See Lines, 
Edwin Stevens^ 

Also, great-grandson of ELLSHA STEVENS. {^See 
Lines, Edwin Stevens?^ 

Also, great-grandson of WALTER BOOTH. \See 
Bevins, Le Grand.] 

LINES, JOHN MARSHALL. 

(No. 1 114. Admitted March 23, i8q6.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Woodbridge, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JAMES LLNES (1748- 
1816), of Woodbridge, Connecticut, who was a private 
in the 3rd company under Capt. Jabez Thompson, in 
the ist regiment, commanded by Colonel David 
Wooster, raised on the first call for troops, and served 
from May 18 to December 20, 1775, around New York, 
and in the northern department at Lake Champlain 
and Lake George, under General Schuyler. 

LINNELL, EDWARD HORATIO. 

(No. 454. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at East Douglass, Massachu- 
setts. 



411 

Great-great-grandson of RICHARD MONTAGUE, 
of Massachusetts (17 29-1 794), who raised a company 
which he commanded at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
He was with the army at Cambridge when Washing- 
ton took command. He received from him his commis- 
sion as Major, and was attached, it is said, to his staff. 

LINSLEY, CHARLES FOOTE. 

(No. 757. Admitted Feb. 22^ iSgs.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Branford, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN PALMER, of Bran- 
ford, Connecticut (175 2-1834). He was in the Revolu- 
tionary service in 1776, under Captain Brock way, in 
Colonel Thompson's command; in 1777, under Captain 
Smith, in Colonel Cook's command; in 1778-79-80, 
under Captain Enoch Staples. He participated in the 
capture of Burgoyne. He was a pensioner. 

LINSLEY, SOLOMON FOWLER. 

(No. 210. Admitted Feb. z/, iSpo.) Of North Haven, 
Connecticut; builder and contractor; born at Walling- 
ford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM DOUGLAS, of North- 
ford, Connecticut (1742-1777), Captain of the 6th com- 
pany of the ist Connecticut regiment, General Woos- 
ter's, 1775, which marched to New York in the latter 
part of June and encamped at Harlem. About Sep- 
tember 28th it marched to the northern department, 
and took part in the operations along Lakes George 
and Champlain, assisted in the reduction of St. Johns 
in October, and afterward was stationed in part at 
Montreal. Early in 1776 he was Major in Colonel 
Ward's regiment, ordered to New York, and June 20th 
he was commissioned Colonel of the 5th battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade. This battalion served on the 
right of the line of works during the battle of Long 
Island, August 27th, and was in the retreat to New 



412 

York, August 29-30. Colonel Douglas commanded a 
brigade at Kip's Bay on the East river at the time of 
the enemy's attack, September 15th. He also partici- 
pated with his regiment in the battle of White Plains, 
October 28th. January i, 1777, he was commissioned 
Colonel of the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, and he 
died from the effects of previous service, May 28, 1777. 

LIPPITT, CHARLES COBB. 

(No. 1140. Admitted April 21^ i8g6). Of New London, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of CHRISTOPHER LIPPITT 
(i 744-1 824), of Cranston, Rhode Island, who previous 
to the war was appointed a Captain of militia at Crans- 
ton. In May, 1775, he was appointed Colonel of the 
3rd regiment of observation. In January, 1776, he 
was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the 2nd regi- 
ment. Colonel Babcock, and in May, 1776, was ap- 
pointed Colonel of the same regiment. In August, 
1776, he was appointed Colonel of the 2nd Rhode Island 
Continental regiment, and served until January, 1777. 
He is said to have participated in the battles of White 
Plains, Trenton, and Princeton, and also served in 
Rhode Island. He was Brigadier-General ' of the 
Rhode Island militia from 1780 to 1784. 

LOCKWOOD, DAVID BENJAMIN. 
(No. 104. Admitted Sept. d, i88g.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; attorney at law; born at Weston, Connecticut. 

Grandson of REUBEN LOCKWOOD, who served 
in the war of the Revolution as teamster. 



413 

LOCKWOOD, EDGAR. 

(No. 75c?. Admitted Feb. 22, iSgj.) Of West Haven, 
Connecticut; engineer; born at Cairo, New York. 

Grandson of NATHANIEL LOCKWOOD, Sr., of 
Horse Neck, Connecticut (1757-1843). The details of 
his service are unknown. He had a deep scar across 
his head from a saber cut. He was a pensioner, and 
in his old age was known as Colonel Lockwood. 

LOCKWOOD, FREDERICK ST. JOHN. 

(No. ^26. Admitted June 75, iSgi.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Norwalk. 

Grandson of ELIPHALET LOCKWOOD, of Nor- 
walk, Connecticut (1741-1814), who, in 1775, was a 
member of the ist company in the 7th Connecticut 
regiment, commanded by Colonel Charles Webb. In 
1778 he was an Assistant-Commissary of issues of the 
Continental army, and in 1780, a Captain in the 9th 
regiment of Connecticut militia, and of a company of 
coast guards raised by order of the General Assembly. 

LOCKWOOD, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. 707. Admitted May 16, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; electrotyper; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of MOSES LOCKWOOD, of 
Wethersfield, Connecticut (1749 ), a private sol- 
dier in the 8th Connecticut regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Jedediah Huntington in 1775, and in the same 
regiment, reorganized as the 8th Connecticut, at New 
York in 1776. In December, 1776, he enlisted in Cap- 
tain Lee's company for three years. He was dis- 
charged July I, 1780, being at that time a Sergeant in 
the regiment of Colonel John Durkee. 

LOOMER, SILAS FULLER. 

(No. 613. Admitted Jan. 18, i8g2.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; insurance; born at Columbia, Connecticut. 

28 



4H 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH LINCOLN, of Massa- 
chusetts (1736-1812), who in 1775, was an Ensign in 
the company of Captain Josiah King, in the 9th Massa- 
chusetts regiment, commanded by Colonel David 
Brewer. He was commissioned 2d Lieutenant in Cap- 
tain Oliver Soaper's company, in the 13th Massa- 
chusetts regiment, commanded by Colonel Joseph 
Read, January i, 1776, and made ist Lieutenant in the 
same regiment August 10, 1776. 

LOOMIS, WILLIAM HORTON. 

(No. 1006. Admitted May 10, i8qs-) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; dentist; born at West Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of DAVID LYMAN (1737- 
1822), of Northampton, Massachusetts, who served as 
ist Lieutenant in the 4th company of the 2d Hamp- 
shire County regiment, and also in the 4th North- 
ampton company. He was also a Lieutenant on the 
muster and pay roll of the company of Captain Jona- 
than Wales, which marched on alarm to East Hoosac, 
thence to Pittsfield, where they took charge of and 
guarded Hessian prisoners to Springfield, by order of 
Brigadier-General Fellows. 

LORD, EVERETT EDWARD. 

(No. 346. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; contractor; born at Killingworth, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of MARTIN LORD, of Killingworth, 
Connecticut (1741-1821), who in October, 1774, was 
appointed by the General Assembly, Ensign of the 
12th company or trainband of the 7th regiment, Con- 
necticut militia. In April, 1775, ^^ was appointed 
Lieutenant of the same company, and afterwards dur- 
ing the war. Captain in the same regiment. 



415 

LOVE, WILLIAM DeLOSS, Jr. 

(No. ij. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ROBERT LOVE, oi Cov- 
entry, Rhode Island, a soldier in the regiment of 
Colonel John Topham. 

LUMMIS, FRANK CARLOS. 

(No. 42^/. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Chaplin, Connecti- 
cut; farmer; born at Montville, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NEHEMIAH HOLT, of Wind- 
ham, Connecticut (i 756-1824), a Sergeant in Captain 
Dyer's company, in Colonel Durkee's regiment, in 
1776. He was in the battle of Long Island, and the 
engagements of Harlem Heights, Trenton, and 
Princeton, and performed other services. 



(_^yf((iy^^sjL.y^i-'-u\,<yy\^ 



LYMAN, HENRY ALEXANDER. 

(No. p6p. Admitted Feb. 22, iSgs-) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at Goshen, Connecticut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of MOSES LYMAN 
( 1 743-1829), of Goshen, Connecticut, who went out 
with the troops from Goshen to join the northern 
army before the surrender of Burgoyne. He was in 
command of a body of troops stationed on the night 
of the 7th of October, 1777, to watch the movements 
of Burgoyne's army, and was the first to inform Gen- 
eral Gates on the morning of the 8th that they had 
deserted their camp. He is said to have conveyed to 
General Washington the first intelligence of the bat- 
tle of Saratoga and the surrender of Burgoyne. He 
also commander of the guard over Major Andre at 
and previous to the time of his execution. 



4i6 

LYON, ERNEST PORTER. 

(No. gi2. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of NEHEMIAH WEBB LYON 
(1759-1860), of Fairfield, Connecticut, a member of Cap- 
tain Najah Bennett's company in service at Greens 
Farms, Connecticut, March 15, 1781. He was pen- 
sioned. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of JAMES FRYE 
(1710-1776), who commanded a regiment of Massachu- 
setts troops at Bunker Hill. He died within a month 
after the battle. 

Also, great-great-grandson of FREDERICK FRYE 
(1748-1826), son of James Frye, who was with his 
father at Bunker Hill, and afterwards served under 
Washington. He was a member of the Society of the 
Cincinnati. 

LYON, IRVING PHILLIPS. 

(No. jsg. Admitted Feb. 22, i^pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; student at Yale University; born at Hart- 
ford. 

Great-great-grandson of NICHOLAS I) ARROW, 
of Middletown, Connecticut. He is believed to have 
participated in the defense of Danbury in 1777; and 
in 1 78 1 he was a member of Captain Z. Hungerford's 
company in service at New London. 

*LYON, IRVING WHITALL. 

(No. 853. Admitted June 5, i8pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Bedford, New York. Died 
March 4, 1896. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL LYON. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILLIAM PHIL- 
LIPS. 

Also, great-grandson of ZEBU ION PHILLIPS. 
\^See Year Book, 18^3-4, p. 313, and obituary, Year Book, 
1895-^.-] 



417 

• 

MAC NAUGHT, GEORGE KILPATRICK. 

(No. 8^4. Admitted Jan. 16, 18(^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; minister; born at Hobart, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSHUA WEBSTER, of 
Glastonbury, Connecticut (i 750-1830), who enlisted 
May, 1775, in Captain Oliver Hanchett's company, 2d 
Continental regiment, commanded by Colonel Joseph 
Spencer and Colonel Samuel Wyllys, and served seven 
months; he was at the siege of Boston, and enlisted 
again in 1776. In January, 1777, he enlisted for three 
years, under Captain John Barnard, in the same regi- 
ment, under Colonel Samuel Wyllys, and served until 
April, 1779, when he was discharged for wounds. He 
was made a pensioner in 1818. 

MANWARING, WOLCOTT BARBER. 

(No. 10^^. Admitted Oct. i^, i8g^.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ALEXANDER WOL- 
COTT, M. D. (1712-1795), of Windsor, Connecticut, 
who was appointed by the General Assembly, in Octo- 
ber, 1776, chairman of a committee to examine and 
certify to the qualifications of applicants for positions 
as surgeons and surgeons' mates in the Continental 
army and navy. He was a deputy from Windsor in 
1777 and 1778. 

Also, great-grandson of SIMON WOLCOTT, M. D. 
(i 746-1809), of New London, Connecticut, who was a 
surgeon in the 6th regiment, commanded by Colonel 
Parsons. 

MAPLES, BRAINERD WELLS. 

(No. J5p. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; editor; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN MAPLES, of New 
London and Norwich, Connecticut (1749 ), a pri- 
vate in the 5th company of the 6th Connecticut regi- 



4i8 

ment; enlisted May, 1775, discharged December, 1775; 
he also enlisted August, 1778, and was discharged Sep- 
tember, 1778. 

MAPLES, WILLIAM LYMAN. 

(No. gyo. Admitted Oct. 16, 18^4.) Of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia; carpenter U. S. Navy; born at Montville, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN MAPLES. \^See Ma- 
ples., Brainerd W.'] 

MARCY, THOMAS KNOWLTON. 

(No. 5P5. Admitted Dec. 14^ i8gi.) Of Windsor, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Willington, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of Lieutenant-Colonel THOMAS 
KNOWLTON, of Ashford, Connecticut (1740-1776). 
At the outbreak of the Revolutionary war, Thomas 
Knowlton, who when a mere boy had fought by the 
side of Putnam against the French and Indians, and 
had won commissions as Ensign and Lieutenant when 
barely twenty years old, was in command of a com- 
pany of Ashford Minutemen, which was among the 
first to march for Boston in the Lexington alarm. On 
the first call for troops by the General Assembly, he 
was commissioned May i, 1775, Captain of the 5th 
company of the 2d Connecticut — General Putnam's — 
regiment. His known abilities led him to be selected 
for the command of the detachment of Connecticut 
men which formed part of the force that took posses- 
sion of Breed's (Bunker) Hill, on the night of the i6th 
of June, 1775, and he was assigned to the defense of 
the stone and rail fence on the left of the redoubt, 
where the enemy was twice repulsed. When our 
troops were driven from the redoubt, the force at the 
fence protected their retreat, and then '' fell back in 
no precipitate flight, but with a fair front and a stead- 
iness worthy their brave resistance." For his gallantry 
in this action, he was made a Major by Congress. It 



419 

was he who led the party which surprised the British 
guard stationed at Charlestown, set fire to the guard- 
house and buildings in the vicinity, made several 
prisoners, and although thundered at by the cannon 
of the fort, retired without loss, and created a small 
panic among the British in Boston. Early in 1776 he 
was Major in Colonel Durkee's regiment — the 20th 
Continental; Lieutenant-Colonel in August, and de- 
tached to the command of " Knowlton's Rangers," a 
small body of select troops composed of officers and 
men chosen from different regiments for special ser- 
vices along the line. In command of this force, he 
was mortally wounded in a spirited engagement on 
New York island, September 16, 1776. He was en- 
dowed with uncommon military genius which im- 
pressed men differing as widely as the prudent and 
sagacious Washington, the brave and impetuous Put- 
nam, and the young but acute Aaron Burr, among his 
contemporaries. A modern military critic, General 
Carrington, says of him : " He seems to have been as 
nearly fire-proof and panic-proof as any man in the 
service." In general orders of September 17th, 
Washington referred to him as ''the gallant and brave 
Colonel Knowlton, who would have been an honor to 
any country." He was buried with military honors 
on the King's Bridge road, but the exact site of his 
burial place is unknown. A brother officer present at 
his funeral wrote: 

" Here Knowlton lies — the great, the good, the brave, 
Slain on the field, now triumphs in the grave; 
Thus falls the valiant in the martial strife, 
The coward lives; his punishment is life." 

MARKHAM, ERNEST ARTHUR. 

(No. 362, Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Durham, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Windsor, Vermont. 

Great-great-grandson of JEREMIAH MARKHAM, 
2d (1734-1827), of Middletown and Enfield, Connecti- 



420 

cut, who was a Sergeant in the company of Captain 
Blague, under Colonel Thaddeus Cook. During the 
battle of Bemis Heights, he acted as Captain of a com- 
pany, was shot under the eye, and left on the field as 
dead. Signs of life were afterwards observed, and 
by careful nursing he was restored to vigor, and lived 
to tell the tale to his grandchildren. 





^r^j?tca/i ^fa^/VHcny? 



Also, great-grandson of JEREMIAH MARKHAM, 
jd, who accompanied his father to General Gates' 
army. 

Also, great-grandson of DANIEL CLARK. [See 
Hall, Eugene Ashley.'\ 

MARKHAM, FRANCIS GEORGE. 

(No. 7^s- Admitted April i8, iSpj.) Of Pawtucket, 
Rhode Island; manufacturer; born at Chatham, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of NATHANIEL MARKHAM, of Chat- 
ham, Connecticut (1754-1829), who turned out from 
the town of Chatham in the Lexington alarm, and 
probably performed other services. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

MASON, CARLOS VIRGIL. 

(No. 642. Admitted Eeb. 22, i8g2.) Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; real estate and insurance; born at Farming- 
ton, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of OZIAS GOODWIN. [See 
Goodwin, Nelson Jones.'\ 

MATHEWSON, ALBERT M^CLELLAN. 

(No. 527. Admitted June 15, i8c}i.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Woodstock, Connecticut. 



42 1 

Great-great-great-grandson oi JONA THAN TRUM- 
BULL. S^See Bull, William Lanmajt.'] 

Also, great - great - grandson of WLLLIAM WIL- 
LLAMS, of Lebanon, Connecticut (1731-1811), member 
of the General Assembly of Connecticut for more 
than fifty years, many years speaker of the lower 
house, and for ninety sessions not absent more than five 
times, except during his service in Congress. When 
the Revolutionary struggle began he aided the patri- 
otic cause by essays on questions of the day, and 
numerous public addresses. The originals of the 
proclamation of Governor Trumbull, issued June 18 
1776, calling on the people to defend their rights and 
liberties, often mentioned as " Connecticut's Declara- 
tion of Independence," and the resolution of the Gen- 
eral Assembly passed in June, 1776, instructing the 
delegates from Connecticut to propose to the general 
congress a declaration of independence, are in his 
handwriting. He was a member of the Council of 
Safety first appointed, a member of the Continental 
Congress, and a SIGNER of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. He was also a member of the convention 
that ratified the Constitution of the United States in 
1788. In 1775 he was Colonel of the 12th regiment of 
Connecticut militia. [See frontispiece.'] 



Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL M'^CLEL- 
LAN, who was Captain of a company of cavalry in 
Woodstock from 1773 to 1775; a member of the Wood- 
stock committee of correspondence, and a member of 
a committee to receive and transmit donations for the 
relief of Boston after the passage of the Boston port 
bill. In the Lexington alarm he marched for Boston 
at the head of forty-five men. He was appointed 
Major of the nth regiment, Connecticut militia, Octo- 



422 

ber 15, 1775; Lieutenant-Colonel of the same regiment 
December 27, 1776; and Colonel, January 23, 1779. 
He served under General Spencer in Rhode Island in 
1777, and was at New London in September, 1781, 
after Arnold's raid, in command of two hundred and 
fifty men. When the public treasury was empty, he 
paid his regiment out of his own pocket. In June, 
1784, he was made Brigadier-General of the 5th Con- 
necticut brigade. 




MATHEWSON, ARTHUR. 

(No. 600. Admitted Dec. 14, i8(pi.) Of Brooklyn, New 
York; surgeon; born at Brooklyn, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL M^CLELLAN. [See 
Mathews on, Albert M^'Clellan?^ 

Also, great-great-grandson oi JONATHAN TRUM- 
BULL. ySee Bull, William Lanman?[ 

Also, great-grandson of WLLLLAM WLLLLAMS. 
S^See Mathewson, Albert M'Clellan.'] 

MATSON, WILLIAM LEWIS. 

(No. pj. Admitted May 25, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; vice-president of the Security Company; 
born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of Governor CALEB STRONG, of 
Northampton, Massachusetts (1745-1819), member of 
the General Court and of the Northampton committee 
of safety during the Revolutionary war. In 1779 he 
was a member of the state constitutional convention, 
and in 1787, of the convention for framing a national 
constitution. In 1789 he was elected one of the first 



423 

United States Senators from Massachusetts, and he 
was re-elected in 1793. From 1800 to 1807, and from 
181 2 to 1816, he was Governor of the commonwealth. 

MAXWELL, FRANCIS TAYLOR. 

(No. 182. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Rockville. 

Great-grandson of HUGH MAXWELL, of Charle- 
mont, Massachusetts (1733-1799), who, in 1762, held a 
Lieutenant's commission in a Massachusetts regiment, 
raised for active service in the French and Indian war. 
He was Lieutenant of a company from Charlemont, 
Massachusetts, at the battle of Bunker Hill, where he 
was wounded. He became Major in Colonel John 
Bailey's regiment, July 7, 1777, and at the close of the 
war, Lieutenant-Colonel. He participated in the bat- 
tles of Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Bemis 
Heights, and Stillwater; was at Valley Forge during 
the winter of 1777 and 1778, and in the battle of Mon- 
mouth the summer following. He was an original 
member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 



-^t^^ A^f^Xc,/^( 



^MAXWELL, GEORGE. 

(No. 134. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Charlemont, Massa- 
chusetts. Died April 2, 1891. 

Grandson of HUGH MAXWELL. ^See Year Book, 
i8gi,pp. 144, 204.] 

MAXWELL, ROBERT. 

(No. lyj. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; born at Rockville. 

Great-grandson of HUGH MAXWELL. [See Max- 
well, Francis Taylor^ 



424 

MAXWELL, WILLIAM. 

(No. i8s. Admitted Ifeb. 4, i8(po.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Rockville. 

Great-grandson of HUGH MAXWELL. {^See Max- 
well^ Francis Taylor.^ 

MAY, CALVIN SLOANE. 

(No. 363. Admitted Sept. 10, iSgo.) Of New York city; 
physician; born at Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of GLDEON HOTCHKLSS. 
^See Cow ell ^ George Hubert ?\^ 

MAY, JAMES OSCAR. 

(No. 206. Admitted Feb. z/, i8po.) Of Naugatuck, Con- 
necticut; druggist; born at Naugatuck. 

Great-great-grandson of GLDEON HOTCHKLSS. 

[See Cornell^ George Hubert.^ 

M^MANUS, ALONZO. 

(No. 4y. Admitted April 20, i88q.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; superintendent; born at Hanover, New 
York. 

Grandson of CHRLSTOPHER M^MANU'S, who 
enlisted at the age of eighteen, was made Sergeant, 
and served in New Jersey and at Yorktown. 

MCNEIL, CHARLES LEVERETT. 

(No. /08. Admitted May 16, i8p2.) Of Torrington, Con- 
necticut; cashier; born at Torrington. 

Great-grandson of WLLLLAM O'DELL (1758-1837), 
a participant in the battle of White Plains, who also 
served as a marine on the " Oliver Cromwell." 

MEECH, STEPHEN BILLINGS. 

(No. 326. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; cashier of the Thames National Bank; born 
at Norwich. 



425 

Great-grandson of SAN FORD BILLINGS, of Ston- 

ington, Connecticut (1736 ), a 2d Lieutenant in 

Captain Wheeler's company, in the 8th regiment of 
Connecticut militia, which served in the campaign 
around New York in 1776. He was also ist Lieutenant 
of a company in the 4th Connecticut battalion, com- 
manded by Colonel John Ely. In 1780 he was a Lieu- 
tenant in Colonel Levi Welles' regiment, raised for 
service along the western coast. He received a com- 
mission as Captain in 1783. 

MEEKER, EDWARD FRANKLIN. 

(No. 114^. Admitted Feb. 3, i8g6.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of BEN J AM LN MEEKER (1741- 
181 7), of Fairfield (now Westport), Connecticut, who, 
on the occasion of Tryon's raid for the destruction of 
military stores and supplies at Danbury, April 28, 
1777, was taken prisoner by soldiers guided to his 
place by a Tory, his house sacked and his cattle driven 
off and butchered. He and his brother Daniel, who 
was also taken prisoner, were conveyed to New York 
and imprisoned in the old Sugar House prison for 
eighteen months. After his release he supported the 
family of his brother Stephen, who was a soldier and 
died in the service in 1778. He also supported his 
sister, the wife of Nathan Bradley of Greenfield, who 
was a soldier enlisted for the war. 

MERRIAM, GEORGE COUCH. 
(No. y6o. Admitted Feb. 22^ iS^j.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of JOHN COUCH. \^See Couch, George 
Wine hell.'] 

MERRILL, AUGUSTUS. 

(No. 32^. Admitted Feb. ly, 1 8go.) Of Cheshire, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at New Hartford, Connecticut. 



426 

Grandson of PHINEAS MERRILL. [S^e Jones, 
Henry Roger. ^ 

MERRIMAN, WILLIAM BUCKINGHAM. 

(No. Sss- Admitted May 10, 18Q3.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; bank teller; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of CHARLES MERRIMAN. \^See 
Elton, James Samuel. '\ 

MERSICK, CHARLES SMITH. 
(No. jog. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; banker and merchant; born at New York 
city. 

Great-grandson of the Reverend Doctor NAPH- 
TALI DAGGETT (1727-1780). Doctor Daggett was 
president of Yale College from 1766 to 1777, and 
continued his relations with the college as professor 
of divinity until his death. When New Haven was 
attacked by the enemy under Governor Tryon in 1779, 
he went out on his old black mare with his long fowl- 
ing piece in his hand and took his station on a hill. 
Near its base ran a road over which the column of the 
enemy advanced and from under the cover of the 
bushes he used his fowling-piece to excellent effect. 
" A detachment was sent up the hillside to look into 
the matter, and the commanding officer coming sud- 
denly, to his great surprise, on a single individual in a 
black coat, blazing away in this style, cried out, ' What 
are you doing there, you old fool, firing on His Ma- 
jesty's troops?' 'Exercising the rights of war,' says 
the old gentleman. The very audacity of the reply 
and the mixture of drollery it contained seemed to 
amuse the officer. ' If I let you go this time, you 
rascal,' says he, * will you ever fire again on the troops 
of His Majesty ? ' ' Nothing more likely,' said the old 
gentleman, in his dry way. This was too much for 
flesh and blood to bear, and it is a wonder they did 
not put a bullet through him on the spot. However, 



427 

they dragged him down to the head of the column, 
and . . . drove him before them at mid-day under 
the burning sun, round through Westville, about five 
miles into the town, pricking him forward with their 
bayonets when his strength failed, and when he was 
ready to sink to the ground from utter exhaustion." 
— yElizur Goodrich.'] 

*MERWIN, AUGUSTUS WHITE. 

(No. 480. Admitted April 21, i8gi.) Of Wilton, Con- 
necticut; born at Norwalk, Connecticut. Died Decem- 
ber 14, 1894. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY TAYLOR. ^See Year 
Bookj i8pj-4^ p. 322^ and obituary^ Year Book^ i8p^-d.] 

MERWIN, EDWIN FLETCHER. 

(JVo. 8^6. Admitted Oct. 17, 1893.) Of New York city; 
merchant; born at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of J ERE BUR WELL, of Milford, 
Connecticut (1757-1834), who served in 1775-6 in Cap- 
tain Peter Perritt's company. Colonel Charles Webb's 
Connecticut regiment. In 1780-82 he served as sea- 
coast guard in a company commanded by Captain 
Peter Hepburn and Lieutenant James Davidson. He 
participated in the siege of Boston, battles of Long 
Island, Trenton, and Princeton, and the defense of 
Danbury. 

MERWIN, JOHN NEWTON. 

(No. P34. Admitted Eeb. 12, 18^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; shirt manufacturer; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson oi /ERE BUR WELL. ySee Merwin, 
Edwin El etc her.] 

MERWIN, SAMUEL EDWIN. 

(No. Z75. Admitted Eeb. 4, i8go.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Brookfield, Connecticut. 



428 

Great-grandson of HENRY N EARING. ^See Bald- 
win^ Mrs. Abigail Jane?[ 

MIDDLEBROOK, JAMES ROBERT. 

(No. 1056. Admitted Sept. 16, iSpS-J Of Suffield, Con- 
necticut; born at Trumbull, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELIJAH BEACH (1731 ), 

of Stratford, Connecticut, Lieutenant in the 2d com- 
pany of the 5th Connecticut regiment, 1775. This 
regiment went to New York in the latter part of June, 
and encamped at Harlem. About September 28, it 
marched to the northern department and took part in 
the operations in the vicinity of Lakes George and 
Champlain. In 1776, he was Captain of the 5th com- 
pany of the battalion commanded by Colonel Heman 
Swift, raised for service at Ticonderoga. 

MIDDLEBROOK, LOUIS FRANK. 

(No. gyi. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance clerk; born at Trumbull, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIJAH BEACH. \^See 
Middlebrook, James Robert.^ 

MIDDLEBROOK, WILLIAM NASH. 

(No. 8^'j. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of EPHRAIM MIDDLEBROOK, 

of Stratford, Connecticut (1736-1777), who served in 
New York in 1776. He was a Lieutenant in command 
of a company during the Danbury raid, April 27, 1777, 
in which he was killed. 

MILES, FREDERICK. 

(No. 60^. Admitted Dec. 14, j8pi.) Of Salisbury, Con- 
necticut; iron manufacturer; born at Goshen, Con- 
necticut. 



429 

Grandson of SAMUEL MILES (1757-1848), who, 
when not quite eighteen years old, turned out with the 
Wallingford company, commanded by Captain Cook, 
in the Lexington alarm. Later in the same year he 
was a member of the company of Captain Isaac Cook, 
Jr., in the ist Connecticut regiment, commanded by 
General David Wooster, raised on the first call for 
troops in April, 1775. This regiment went to New 
York in the latter part of June, and encamped at 
Harlem. In September it marched to the northern 
department, took part in the operations along Lakes 
George and Champlain, and assisted in the reduction 
of St. Johns, in October. A part of the regiment was 
afterwards stationed at Montreal. In 1776 he served 
as a marine on the galley ''Whiting," which was cap- 
tured in the North river in the fall of that year. The 
galley was commanded by Captain John McCleave, 
who was probably his brother-in-law. He also served 
under Captain Perry, and he was a member of Cap- 
tain Miles Johnson's company, in Colonel Noadiah 
Hooker's regiment, at Peekskill in the summer of 
1777. 

MILES, FREDERICK PLUMB. 

(No. 606. Admitted Dec. 14, i8qi.) Of Lakeville, Connecti- 
cut; iron manufacturer; born at Goshen, Connecticut. 
Great-grandson of SAMUEL MILES. ^See Miles, 
Frederick^ 

MILES, RICHARD WINTER. 

(No. 761. Admitted Feb. 22, iSgj.) Of Meriden, Connecti- 
cut; clerk; born at Cowansville, Province of Quebec. 

Great-grandson of CALEB PARKER, of Shrews- 
bury, Massachusetts (1760-1826). In 1776 he was a 
member of Captain Manassah Sawyer's company in 
Colonel Dike's regiment, in service in Rhode Island. 
He also served at three other times, and was finally 
discharged December 30, 1780. 

29 



430 

MILES, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS. 

(No. 664. Admitted Jan. 18, i8g2.) Of Poughkeepsie, 
New York; iron; born at Goshen, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL MILES. ^See Miles, 
Frederick^ 

MILLARD, (MRS.) GERTRUDE HILLS. 

(No. 404. Admitted Dec. 22, i8go.) Wife of Cornwall T. 
Millard, of Hartford, Connecticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-granddaughter of JONAS COOLIDGE. 
[See Hills., Jonas Coolidge.'] 

*MILLER, EUGENE SPENCER. 

(No. 428. Adfnitted Feb. 2, i8pi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; broker; born at Huntington, Massachusetts. 
Died June 3, 1893. 

Great-grandson of LEVI VINTON. [See Year Book, 
1^93-4, PP- 325,420.'] 

MITCHELL, EMLYN VALENTINE. 

(No. looy. Admitted May 10, 18^5.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Sangerville, Maine. 

Great-great-grandson of JEDIAH PHIPS (1724- 
1818), of Sherborn, Massachusetts, who was a member 
of the committee of correspondence of Sherborn in 
1774 and 1775, and of the committee of public safety 
in 1780. 

*MITCHELL, GEORGE HENRY. 

(No. 762. Admitted Feb. 22, 18Q3.) Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Bristol. Died March 
6, 1896. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM MITCHELL. [See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, p. 325, and obituary, Year Book, i8ps-d.] 

MIX, ELL 

(No. losj. Admitted Dec. 16, i8ps.) Of New Haven 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at New Haven. 



431 

Great-grandson of AMOS GILBERT (1729-1805), 
of New Haven, Connecticut, who was a member of the 
2d company of Governor's Foot Guard which marched 
under Captain Benedict Arnold in the Lexington 
alarm of April, 1775. He was also a member of the 
5th company, 2d regiment of militia, under Captain 
Caleb Mix. He was a direct descendant of Matthew 
Gilbert, one of the foremost men in New Haven 
colony, who in 1639 was the first magistrate, and was 
deputy governor in 166 1-2-3. He died 1680. 

MIX, FRANK WILLIAM. 

(No. 1008. Admitted May 10, i8gf^.) Of Stamford, Con- 
necticut; superintendent of factory; born at Ply- 
mouth, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ELISHA MIX (1761-1818), of West 
Hartford, Connecticut, who enlisted as a private for 
eight months from May 26, 1777, in the company of 
Captain Catlin, in the 5th regiment, Connecticut line. 
He re-enlisted for the war August 14, 1777, from 
Goshen, in the 7th regiment, Connecticut line. He 
was a pensioner. 

MONROE, CHARLES FABYAN. 

(No. 8^8. Admitted June ^^ i^gj.) Of Meriden, Connecti- 
cut; manufacturer; born at Providence, Rhode Island. 
Great-grandson of MICHAEL MO ETON, of New- 
port, Rhode Island (1757-1820), who during January, 
1778, was Lieutenant on the sloop-of-war *' Prov- 
idence," Captain Rathbone; he participated in the re- 
markable expedition to New Providence in 1778, when 
two forts were dismantled, a ship and a brig taken, 
two schooners, and thirty American prisoners released 
without shedding a drop of blood. 

MONTGOMERY, JOHN ROBERT. 

(No. ^65. Admitted Sept. 13, i8pi.) Of Windsor Locks, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Great Barring- 
ton, Massachusetts. 



432 

Great-grandson of HUGH MONTGOMERY {^^(^2- 
1842), of Salisbury, Connecticut, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier, detailed during the greater part of the war as a 
scout. 

MOORE, (MRS.) EUDORAH DINE STEPHENS. 
(No. ^63. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Wife of George C. 
Moore of Hartford, Connecticut; born at Towanda, 
Bradford County, Pennsylvania. 

Great-great-granddaughter of Captain SAMUEL 
RANSOM {i"] 2,1-^^-11^), who was commissioned, August 
26, 1776, Captain of the 2d independent company of 
Westmoreland County, Connecticut, now a part of 
Pennsylvania. This company joined Washington's 
army in New Jersey about January, 1777, and was 
engaged in the battles of Brandywine and German- 
town, and wintered at Valley Forge, 1777-78. He 
resigned his command in June, 1778, and hastened 
to Wyoming to defend his home against the British 
and Indians. He was killed in the Wyoming massa- 
cre, July 3, 1778. 

MOREHOUSE, CORNELIUS STARR. 

(No. 4SS. Admitted Feb. 18^ i8gi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; book printer; born at Newtown, Connecticut. 



Great-grandson of GERSHOM MOREHOUSE, 
Captain in Colonel Whitney's regiment, the 4th Con- 
necticut militia, and a participant in the battle of 
White Plains. 

Also, grandson of AARON MOREHOUSE (1759- 
1833), of Redding, Connecticut, who entered the army 
as fifer at the age of sixteen, and was in the battles 
at Flatbush, Long Island, Redhook, and other places. 

MORGAN, HENRY CHURCHILL. 

(No. p5. Admitted Sept. d, i88g,) Of Colchester, Con- 
necticut; retired officer of the United States army; 
born at Brooklyn, New York. 



433 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM AVERY MORGAN. 
\^See Bulkeley^ Morgan Gardner.'] 

MORGAN, JAMES HENRY. 

(No. ipj. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Brooklyn, New 
York; insurance; born at Brooklyn. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM AVERY MORGAN. 
\^See Bulkeley, Morgan Gardner.] 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH CHURCH- 
ILL. \^See JBulkeley, Erastus Brainerd.] 

Also, great-grandson of JON' A THAN GARDNER, 
a private in Captain Waterman's company in the 2otli 
Connecticut; on duty at New London, July 9, 1779. 

♦MORGAN, LEWIS LYMAN. 

(No. JS' Admitted April 16, i88q.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; publisher of the New Haven Register and 
the Boston Post; born at Windsor, Vermont. Died 
February 11, 1893. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER MORGAN. ^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. 327, 408.] 

MORGAN, WILLIAM DENISON. 
(No. 213. Admitted Feb. ly, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL PUTNAM. {See 
Hewitt, Elisha.] 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM AVERY MOR- 
GAN. [See Bulkeley, Morgan Gardner.] 

MORGAN, WILLIAM EDWIN. 
(No. loj. Admitted April 24, i88p.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; railroad freight agent; born at New 
Haven. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER MORGAN, a Ser- 
geant in a Massachusetts regiment. 



434 

MORRIS, HENRY LINCOLN. 

(No. gij. Admitted March 5, 18^4,) Of New York; 
secretary of the Order of Founders and Patriots of 
America; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of EDWARD MORRIS (1756- 
1801), of Massachusetts, who was in the army of Can- 
ada under General Thomas, and afterwards served in 
Captain James Shaw's company, Colonel Charles 
Pynchon's regiment, at the Bennington alarm, in 
September and October, 1777. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of JOHN BLISS, 
of Massachusetts (i 727-1809). On the 8th of April, 
1775, he was appointed by the Provincial Congress of 
Massachusetts a commissioner to Connecticut to co- 
operate with Massachusetts in measures for the gen- 
eral defense. He was appointed on a similar com- 
mission on the 28th of April, 1775. October 7, 1777, 
he was appointed Colonel of the ist Hampshire County 
regiment, and he served in Westchester County, New 
York. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH FELT. \See 
Felt, Levi Lincoln^ 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of B EN J A M IN 
MILES. [See Felt, Levi Lincoln.l 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of SHARON 
PEASE. YSee Felt, Levi Lincoln?\^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of JACOB HLLLS (1743- 
1819), of Enfield, Connecticut, who was a member of 
Captain Hezekiah Parsons' company. Colonel Sage's 
regiment, 3d battalion, Wadsworth's brigade, raised 
June, 1776. 

MORRIS, JOHN EMERY. 

(No. 44. Admitted April ip, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; assistant secretary of the Travelers' Insur- 
ance Company; born at Springfield, Massachusetts. 



435 

Great-grandson of EDWARD MORRIS, {See Mor- 
ris^ Henry Lincoln^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN BLISS. \See 
Morris^ Henry Lincoln?^ 

MORRIS, JONATHAN FLYNT. 
(No. 5. Admitted April 2, 188^.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Charter Oak National Bank; 
born at Belchertown, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of EDWARD MORRIS. {See Morris, 
Henry Lincoln^ 

Also, great-grandson of JOHN BLISS. \_See Morris., 
Henry Lincoln?^ 

MORRIS, RICHARD COOPER. 

(No. 860. Admitted Sept. 12, iSgj.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; United States marshal; born at New 
London. 

Great-grandson of JOHN ROGERS ( 1796), 

who enlisted, May 24, 1777, in Colonel Sheldon's Light 
Dragoons; served more than one year. 

MORSE, GEORGE NEWTON. 
(No. 2^8. Admitted March 2p, i8po.J Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of JOHN BOOTH, a Connecticut 
soldier during the Revolutionary war. 

MOSES, GEORGE NEWTON. 

(No. sS6. Admitted Oct. 20, i8pi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; secretary; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of MICHAEL MOSES, of Sims- 
bury, Connecticut (1737-1797), a private in the i8th 
regiment, Connecticut militia, commanded by Colonel 
Phelps. 

Also, great-grandson of ALPHEUS MUNSELL 
(1751-1807), of Windsor, Connecticut, a member of the 



436 

3d company, of the 2d Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Joseph Spencer, 1775. Detach- 
ments of officers and men of this regiment were en- 
gaged in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in Arnold's 
Quebec expedition. 

MULL, (MRS.) LAURA HALE. 

(No. j6o. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Philipsburg, 
Pennsylvania; born at Lewiston, Pennsylvania. 

Great-granddaughter of CHARLES SEYMOUR. 
\^See Hale^ Jidia Lucy.] 

MUNROE, FRANCIS HOWE. 

(JVo. yds. Admitted Eeb. 22, iSgj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Westminster, Maryland. 

Great-grandson of BEZALEEL HOWE, of Marl- 
borough, Massachusetts, and New York city (1750- 
1825), who participated in the battle of Bunker Hill 
as a member of a New Hampshire regiment, and was 
also in the battle on Long Island. He had the rank of 
Captain, and remained in the army nine years after 
the close of the war of the Revolution, thus giving 
sixteen years' service to his country. He was known 
as Major Howe. 

*MUNSON, LUZERNE ITHIEL. 

(No. yg4. Admitted April 18, 18Q3.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at Wallingford, Con- 
necticut. Died October 28, 1895. 

Grandson of ITHIEL MUNSON, of Wallingford, 
Connecticut (1760-1835), a member of Captain Elisha 
Ely's company, in the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, 
formation of 1777-81, in which he served eight months 
from April 24, 1777. \_See obituary, Year Book, iSp^-d.] 

MURRAY, CHARLES HENRY. 

(No. 481. Admitted April 21, 1 8(^1.) Of New York city; 
lawyer; born at San Francisco, California. 



437 

Great-grandson of DANIEL BILLINGS (1750- 
1802), of Pomfret, Connecticut, commissioned January 
I, 1776, Ensign in the loth Continental regiment, 
Colonel Samuel Holden Parsons. This regiment was 
engaged in the battle of Long Island, and in the fight- 
ing at New York when the city was abandoned by our 
forces. 

Also, great-great-grandson of Ensign CHARLES 
ELDRIDGE. S^See Eldridge, James William?^ 

Also, great-grandson of HEZEKIAH SEYMOUR, 
a private soldier. 

MUZZY, ADRIAN JAMES. 

(No. (p'j2. Admitted Oct. 16, i8q4?[ Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; merchant, born at Bristol. 

Great - great - grandson of JOSEPH EYING TON 
(1736-1798), of Bristol, Connecticut, who enlisted from 
Farmington on the first call for troops, May i, 1775, in 
the company of Captain Noadiah Hooker of the 2d 
regiment, commanded by General Spencer, which 
marched to Boston, took post at Roxbury and served 
through the siege. In 1776 he served under Colonel 
Wyllys, and was engaged in the operations around 
New York city and on Long Island, being present at 
the battle of Long Island. He was discharged April 
23, 1783. 

NARAMORE, FRANK JULIAN. 

(No. 861. Admitted June 5, i8pj.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Bridgeport. 

Great -great -grandson of WILLIAM WORDLN. 
\^See Hawley, Charles Wilson.'] 

Also, great-grandson of WILLLAM WORDIN, Jr. 
\^See Haw ley, Charles Wilson.] 

NELSON, ABIEL WARD. 

(No. 862. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of New London, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Lakeville, Massachusetts. 



438 

Great-grandson of JOB PEIRCE, of Middleborough, 
Massachusetts (1737-1819), who served two days in 
Lexington alarm, 1775, under Captain Abiel Pearce, 2d 
company of Middleborough, Massachusetts. He was 
commissioned 2d Lieutenant, February 21, 1776, in 
Captain Nathaniel Wood's company, Colonel Cary's 
Massachusetts regiment. Elected as Captain by the 
7th company, Plymouth County regiment, March 5, 
1776. He entered the service again as Captain in 
Colonel Sprout's regiment, December 9, 1776, and 
served ten days. Captain in Theophilus Cotton's 
regiment, December 11, 1777. 

NELSON, RICHARD HENRY. 

(No. 6^4. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL DELAVAN 
(1746 ), commissioned September 20, 1775, Cap- 
tain in the New York regiment commanded by Pierre 
Van Cortlandt. He was made Major of this regiment 
in 1778. 

NEWCOMB, GEORGE FRANKLIN. 

(No. 102. Admitted April 24^ i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; investment broker; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of BRADFORD NEWCOMB, a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

NEWELL, ROGER SAMUEL. 
(No. 764. Admitted Feb. 22, iSgj.) Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Bristol. 

Gre2it-gr2indsonoi SIMEON NEWELL. [See Chapin, 
Charles Edward.'] 

Also, great-grandson of ELI SUA BREWSTER, Jr., 

of Plymouth, Connecticut (17 15 ), Ensign in the 

17th Continental regiment, commanded by Colonel 
Jedediah Huntington, commissioned January i, 1777- 



439 

NEWELL, WILLIAM GILBERT. 
(No. P7J. Admitted Oct. j6, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; teacher of dancing; born at East Hartford, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN JOHNSON {i^^- 
1815), of Middletown, Connecticut, who served as Cap- 
tain in Colonel Bradley's battalion, Wadsworth's bri- 
gade, in the campaign around New York, He also 
served as Major from January i, 1777, in the 5th regi- 
ment,Connecticutline, under Colonel Philip Burr Brad- 
ley, and on May 25, 1778, was promoted to be Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel of the same regiment, vice Mead, resigned. 
He wintered at Valley Forge, 1777-78, and was pres- 
ent at the battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778. 

NEWTON, ARTHUR DUANE. 

(No. 4pp. Admitted May 28, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the Eddy Manufacturing Com- 
pany; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of LEVI CHIDSEY (1745- 

), member of Captain Bradley's company of 

matrosses, raised for the defense of New Haven at 
the time Tryon's invasion, 1779. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson oiSAMUEL NEW- 
TON, of Southboro, Massachusetts, who served in 
Captain Elijah Bellows' company, which marched for 
Boston in April, 1775. He also served in Captain 
Moses Harrington's company in Colonel Dike's regi- 
ment. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WIN SLOW NEW- 
TON, of Southboro, Massachusetts, who marched for 
Boston in Captain Elijah Bellows' company, in April, 
1775. In 1776 he was a member of Captain Manassah 
Sawyer's company in Colonel Dike's regiment. He 
also rendered military service at other times. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of JONATHAN 
RUGG, of Framingham, Massachusetts, a Sergeant in 



440 

Captain David Brewer's company, in Colonel Perry's 
regiment of militia, which marched to Rhode Island 
in 1780. 

Also, great-great-grandson of DANIEL RUGG, of 
Framingham, Massachusetts, who was a member of 
Captain Harrington's company, in Colonel Dike's regi- 
ment in 1776, and in 1780, a member of Captain David 
Brewer's company, in Colonel Perry's regiment, which 
marched to Rhode Island. 

NEWTON, CHARLES EDWARD. 

(No. 4g8. Admitted May 28, iSpi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the Jewell Belting Company; 
born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of LEVI CHIDSEY. \^See 
Newton^ Arthur Duane.'] 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of SAMUEL 
NEWTON. {See Newton, Arthur Duane.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of WINSLOW NEW- 
TON. [See Newton, Arthur Duane.] 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of JONATHAN 
RUGG. [See Newton, Arthur Duane ^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of DANIEL RUGG. 
[See Newton, Arthur Duane.] 

NEWTON, CHARLES WATSON. 

(No. 464. Admitted March 16, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; coal merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of REUBEN HARRIS, of Lisbon, 
Connecticut (1740-1829), who was with the army at Val- 
ley Forge, where his sufferings were such that he lost 
the sight of both eyes. 

NEWTON, GEORGE BAKER. 

(No. yio. Admitted Jan. 6, 18^3.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of REUBEN HARRIS. [See Newton, 
Charles Watson.] 



441 

NEWTON, HENRY GLEASON. 

(No. 1115. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of New Haven, 
Connectictit; lawyer; born at Durham, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ABNER NEWTON (1764-1852), of 
Durham, Connecticut, who served on several short ex- 
peditions under Captain Charles Norton, of Durham. 

NEWTON, ROGER WATSON. 

(No. 10^8. Admitted Dec. 16, 18^5.) Of Durham, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Durham. 

Son of ABNER NEWTON. \^See Newton, Henry 
Gleason.^ 

NICHOLS, FRANCIS DURANDO. 

(No. 786. Admitted April 18, i8pj.J Of Black Rock, Con- 
necticut; architectural editor of Scientific American; 
born at Black Rock. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM NICHOLS, of Bridge- 
port, Connecticut (1755-1837), who was in service under 
several enlistments for short terms during the Revolu- 
tionary war. He participated in the defense of Con- 
necticut against the invasion under Tryon, and saw 
General Wooster when he fell. 

*NICHOLS, STEPHEN. 

(No. 281. Admitted March 2g, i8po.J Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; born at Trumbull, Connecticut. Died 
April 8, 1893. 

Son of WILLIAM NICHOLS. [See Year Book, 1893-4, 

pp' 333, 417 ^, 

NILES, WILLIAM PORTER. 

(No. 76s. Admitted Feb. 22, i8pj.) Of Concord, New 
Hampshire; student in Trinity College; born at East 
Windsor, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of BENJAMIN OLMSTED, of 

East Hartford, Connecticut (1751 ), a member of 

the 2d company of the 4th Connecticut regiment, 1775. 



442 

NOBLE, CHARLES HENRY. 

(No. 863. Admitted June 5, 18Q3.) Of New Milford, 
Connecticut; accountant; born at New Milford. 

Great-grandson of CLEMENT BOTSFORD, of 
Newtown, Connecticut (i 751-1824), a Sergeant in the 
8th company, Captain Joseph Smith, 5th regiment, 
Colonel Waterbury; served from May 9, to October 27, 
1775. He was Ensign in the 7th company, Captain 
Jabez Botsford, Colonel Smith's battalion; served from 
June or July, to November, 1776. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ZADOCK NOBLE 
(1723-1786), who was a member of the New Milford 
committee of inspection and correspondence. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSLAIL LACEY (1746- 
181 2), of Stratford, Connecticut, who served in the 
Continental army as private. Ensign, 2d Lieutenant, 
Captain, and Regimental Quartermaster. 

NOBLE, GEORGE BELDEN. 

(No. g74. Admitted Feb. 11, 18Q5.) Of Easthampton, 
Massachusetts; manufacturer; born at New Milford, 
Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ZADOCK NOBLE. ^See 
Noble., Charles ITenry.'] 

Also, great-grandson of ABEL BURRLTT (1742- 
1828), of New Haven, Connecticut, who, in March, 1776, 
was appointed one of the New Haven committee of 
inspection to keep watch of persons suspected of aid- 
ing the enemy. In February, 1778, he was appointed by 
the General Assembly, Captain of the ist company or 
train-band in the 2d regiment of militia, and turned 
out to defend the town, at the time of the invasion 
by Tryon, July 5, 1779. 

Also, great-grandson of BENJAMLN HLCKOK 
(1750-1816), of Danbury, Connecticut, who, in May, 
1777 was appointed by the General Assembly, Lieu- 



443 

tenant of the 4th troop of the 3rd regiment of Light 
Horse; and in July, 1779, was appointed Captain of a 
company in the 3rd regiment of Light Horse. 

NOBLE, THOMAS KIMBALL. 

(No. 6s5. Admitted March 26, i8(p2.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Norway, Maine. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN NOBLE {1^22-1^^-]), 
a Revolutionary soldier of Gray, Maine. He was in a 
number of engagements, and was killed at Saratoga, 
October 7, 1777. 

NORCROSS, HENRY FANNING. 

(No. P75. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Monson, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of CHARLES EANNLNG (1749- 
1833), of Preston, Connecticut, who was a Sergeant in 
the 2d company under Captain (afterwards Colonel) 
John Tyler of the 6th regiment, under Colonel Par- 
sons, from May 8, to December 16, 1775, on duty at 
New London and around Boston. He also served 
from June to December, 1776, as Ensign of the 6th 
company, Captain Huntington, of the 4th battalion. 
Colonel Selden, of Wadsworth's brigade, raised to 
reinforce Washington in New York. He was com- 
missioned January i, 1777, a 2d Lieutenant in the 4th 
regiment, Connecticut line, under Colonel John Dur- 
kee, and on November 15, 1778, he was commissioned 
a ist Lieutenant, and on May i, 1779, he was appoint- 
ed paymaster, of the same regiment. The regiment 
went first to Peekskill in the spring of 1777, and after- 
wards joined Washington's army in Pennsylvania; 
engaged in the battle of German town, October 4, 1777, 
and in the defense of Fort Mifflin in November; 
wintered at Valley Forge, and was engaged at the 
battle of Monmouth in June following; encamped at 
White Plains, and wintered at Redding, Connecticut; 



444 

in 1779, was engaged in the movements on the Hud- 
son, and wintered in 1780-81 at Connecticut Village. 
In the formation of 1781-83 he was paymaster of the 
ist regiment Connecticut line, under Colonel John 
Durkee, and served till January i, 1783, when, in the 
formation of January-June, 1783, he served as Lieu- 
tenant in the ist regiment, Connecticut line, under 
Colonel Zebulon Butler. He was a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. 

NORKETT, FRANKLIN SISSON. 

(No. 1116. Admitted March 2j, iSp6.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; dentist; born at New London. 

Great-grandson of JOSHUA LESTER (1763-1846), 
of Lyme, Connecticut, who enlisted in June, 1777, in a 
company commanded by Captain John Johnson and 
afterwards by Captain Andrew Griswold, and served 
at different times as called upon through the war. 
The company was not attached to any regiment, but 
was employed in guarding the coast, between the Con- 
necticut and Niantic rivers, the duty being sometimes 
performed on land and sometimes on water, there 
being frequent skirmishes on the Sound. He was 
granted a pension for two years' actual service. 

NORTH, JOHN CURTISS. 

(No. 1021. Admitted June ly, ^^95-) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; insurance; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of OLIVER DICKINSON (1757- 
1847), of Litchfield, Connecticut, who volunteered in 
May, 1776, for twelve months' service under Captain 
Nathaniel Tuttle, in Colonel Charles Webb's regiment. 
At the battle of White Plains he was one of those who 
guarded the ammunition wagons. He turned out to 
repel the British advance on Danbury in April, 1777, 
in the summer of that year served two weeks as one 
of a guard to a train of teams transporting arms and 



445 

ammunition from Litchfield to Fishkill, and again in 
the fall served six weeks at Crompond and Stony 
Ridge. In 1781 he served six weeks as coast guard 
under Captain Catlin. He was a pensioner. 

NORTHROP, BIRDSEY GRANT. 

(No. yii. Admitted Jan. d, i8g3.) Of Clinton, Con- 
necticut; lecturer; born at Kent, Connecticut. 

Grandson of AMOS NORTHROP, of New Milford, 
Connecticut (i 742-1 779), ist Lieutenant in a regiment 
commanded by Colonel Samuel Whiting, raised for 
service on the Westchester line during the winter of 
1776-77. Later, according to family traditions, he 
acted as Commissary, and died of consumption, hast- 
ened by exertions in the service. 

NORTHROP, DAVID WARD. 

(No. 633. Admitted Feb. 13, i8g2.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; attorney-at-law; born at Sherman, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of EDWARD ROGERS, of Corn- 
wall, Connecticut (i 734-1813), who raised and com- 
manded the 3d company in the regiment of Colonel 
Fisher Gay, which served at the Brooklyn front dur- 
ing the battle of Long Island, and was with the main 
army at White Plains. In 1777 he was Captain of a 
company in the Connecticut state regiment command- 
ed by Colonel Roger Enos, and in April of that year 
he was engaged with his company in the defense of 
Danbury against the raid under Tryon. 

NORTHROP, HENRY EVANS. 
(No. 864. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Brooklyn, New 
York; professor of German; born at Framingham, 
Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of AMOS NORTHROP. [See Nor- 
throp, Birdsey Grant.'] 
30 



440 

NORTON, THOMAS LOT. 

(No. 865. Admitted May 10, iSpj.J Of Lakeville, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Salisbury, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN WHITTLESEY. S^See 
Aver ill, John Chester ^^ 

NOYES, FRANKLIN BABCOCK. 

(No. 66. Admitted April IS, i88g.) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; loan agent; born at Westerly, Rhode Island. 

Grandson of THOMAS NOYES, Lieutenant in the 
nth company of the 2d regiment, of the brigade 
raised by the state of Rhode Island and Providence 
Plantations in 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH NOYES, Colonel 
of the I St regiment of militia. Kings County, Rhode 
Island, 1776. 

*OLCOTT, ISAIAH WATERMAN. 

(No. 866. Admitted April 18, 18Q3.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; teacher; born at Islip, New York. Died 
June I, 1894. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC OLCOTT. {^See Year Book, 
18^3-4, p. 336, and obituary. Year Book, i8p3-6.] 

OLCOTT, WILLIAM MARVIN. 

(No. 614. Admitted Jan. 18, i8g2.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; born at Utica, New York. 

Great-grandson of JOEL DO O LIT TIE (1764 ), 

of Middletown, Connecticut, a Revolutionary soldier 
who served under Captain Richard Douglass, in the 
5th regiment, Connecticut line, formation of 1781-83, 
commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Isaac Sherman. 

OLMSTED, ALBERT HENRY. 

(No. 223. Admitted Feb. 17, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Hartford. 

Grandson of BENJAMIN OLMSTED. [See Niles, 
William Porter^ 



447 

OLMSTED, FREDERICK LAW. 

(No. 482. Admitted April 21^ i8gi.) Of Brookline, 
Massachusetts; landscape architect; born at Hartford, 
Connecticut. 

Grandson of BENJAMIN OLMSTED. \^See Niks, 
William Porter.'] 

ORTON, JOHN JACKSON. 

(No. 1022. Admitted June ly, i8q^.) Of Lakeville, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Monterey, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of GILES JACKSON (1733-1810), 
of Weston, Massachusetts, who was deputy at the 
Congress that met at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, in 

1774, and a member of the Provincial Congress of 
Massachusetts which met at Salem, Watertown and 
Cambridge in 1774. He was Major of the ist Berk- 
shire County regiment of Massachusetts militia in 

1775, elected Colonel of that regiment by the House 
of Representatives, and his appointment concurred in 
by the Council October 11, 1777. He served at Bunker 
Hill, White Plains, Peekskill, Monmouth, and Sara- 
toga. 

OSBORN, ALLAN MERWIN. 

(No. 102 J. Admitted June //, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; clerk; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS GILBERT {j^^^- 
1847), of Stratford, Connecticut, a Corporal in Captain 
John Stevens' company, attached to Colonel Burrall's 
regiment. He participated in Arnold's expedition 
against Quebec. 

OSBORN, JOHN ARTHUR. 

(No. 2p8. Adfnitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at New Canaan, Con- 
necticut. 



448 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN PARSONS, of 
Redding, Connecticut, who enlisted April lo, 1777, for 
the war. He was taken prisoner July 2, 1777, was 
returned August, 1778, and discharged April 4, 1781. 

OSBORN, NORRIS GALPIN. 

(No. 302. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; editor; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS GILBERT. ^See 
Osborn, Allan Merwin.) 

OSBORNE, ARTHUR DIMON. 

(No. 86'j. Admitted Jan. 16, iSg4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; president of Second National Bank; born 
at Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JEREMIAH OSBORNE, of Ridge- 
field, Connecticut (1753-1825), who enlisted, June 22, 
1776, in Captain Dickinson's company. Colonel Samuel 
Elmore's regiment, and re-enlisted January 6, 1777, 
under Lieutenant Furnival of New York. On Jan- 
uary 7, 1777, his name appears on the rolls of Colonel 
Lamb's artillery as gunner; he continued in service 
until 1781. 

Also, great-grandson of DAVID DIMON (1742- 
1777), Captain of a company from Fairfield in the Lex- 
ington alarm; Captain of 4th company, 5th regiment, 
1775; was Brigade-Major and then Lieutenant-Colonel 
of 6th regiment, Connecticut line; took part in battle 
of Ridgefield; died in service. 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA HINMAN, who 
commanded the vessels of war "Cabot" and "-Alfred," 
also the privateer " Marquis de Lafayette." 

OSGOOD, FREDERICK EARNED. 

(No. ^28. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; druggist; born at Norwich. 



449 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM LARNED (1752- 
1828), appointed July 20, 1778, Commissary of forage 
in Rhode Island. In this capacity he served until 
August 10, 1780. 

PACKARD, CALEB LEACH. 

(No. 405. Admitted Dec. 22^ i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; chief of police; born at Hartford. 

Grandson of SHARON PEASE. ^See Felt, Levi Lin- 
coln?^ 

PAGE, ELMER ELLSWORTH. 

(No. gyd. Admitted Feb. 11, i8gs.) Of Saco, Maine; 
agent; born at Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of NATHAN WOODMAN 
(1726-1812), of HoUis, Maine, who enlisted May 3, 1775, 
in a Maine company commanded by Captain Jeremiah 
Hill. He also served as Corporal from January i, 
i777> to January 2, 1780, in the company of Captain 
Daniel Lines, upon the quota of Topfield. 

PALMER, EDWIN. 
(No. 364. Admitted Sept. 10^ i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; retired merchant; born at Preston, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of JOSHUA PENDLETON (1744-1824), 
in 1775 Ensign of the ist company of Westerly, Rhode 
Island; in the same year Lieutenant, and from 1778 to 
1780 Captain of the same company, which w^as em- 
ployed in guarding the coast at Watch Hill and other 
places. 

PALMER, RALPH AVERILL. 

(No. 868. Admitted Jan. 18, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bank cashier; born at Branford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL AVERILL, of Kent, 
Connecticut (1763-1842), who enlisted, April 25, 1778, 



450 

in Captain Ebenezer Hill's company, 7th regiment, 
Connecticut line; appointed fifer August 16, 1778; dis- 
charged April 21, 1 781, and received a pension for his 
services. 

PARKER, BURTON. 

(No. 802. Admitted April 18, 1893.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of TITUS PECK, of Wood- 
bridge, Connecticut (1742-1776), appointed Ensign of 
the 3d company of the 5th battalion, Wadsworth's bri- 
gade, raised in June, 1776, to reinforce Washington's 
army in New York. He died in October of that year 
of camp distemper. His gravestone gives him the 
rank of Lieutenant. 

Also, great-great-grandson of MATTHEW PAR- 
KER, of Saybrook and Sharon, Connecticut (1712- 
1800), a member of a company of householders of the 
town of Sharon, 1776. 

PARKER, CHARLES. 

(No. 7PJ. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Cheshire, Connecti- 
cut. 

Son of STEPHEN PARKER, of Cheshire, Con- 
necticut (1759-1846). He enlisted in May, 1777, in the 
company of Captain James Peck of Wallingford, in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Enos, and served 
till December. In September he was ordered to the 
North river, and there attached to General Parsons' 
regiment. He again enlisted in July, 1779, in the 
company of Captain Amos Hotchkiss, and served 
about three months, including the alarms at New 
Haven, Fairfield, and Danbury. He again enlisted in 
June, 1780, and served six months in the 7th regiment, 
Connecticut line, under Colonel Heman Swift, being 
with the regiment at Nelson's Point, opposite West 



451 

Point, at Peekskill, King's Ferry, Tappan, where he 
witnessed Andre's execution, and afterwards at the 
Highlands, where winter huts were built. He was a 
pensioner. 

PARKER, CHARLES JULIUS. 

(No. 86g. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; shirt manufacturer; born at New Britain. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL PARKER, of Walling- 
ford, Connecticut (1740-1814), who served as a private 
soldier, and was present at the surrender of Burgoyne. 

PARKER, EDWIN POND. 

(No. 766. Admitted Feb. 22, 1893.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Castine, Maine. 

Great-grandson of TITUS PECK. ^See Parker, 
Burton.^ 

Also, great-grandson of MATTHEW PARKER. 
l^See Parker, Burton.^ 

PARKER, HARRIS. 

(No. ypp. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; salesman; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of TITUS PECK. [See Parker, 
Burton. 

Also, great - great - grandson of MATTHEW 
PARKER. [See Parker, Burtoft.] 

PARKER, JOHN DWIGHT. 

(No. JJ5. Admitted May 10, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; assistant secretary of the Connecticut Mutual 
Life Insurance Company; born at Pittsfield, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of LINUS PARKER, of Lenox, 
Massachusetts (1758 ). He was a member of Cap- 
tain Aaron Rowley's company, in Colonel Symonds' 



452 

regiment, from April 26 to May 19, 1777; was a sharp- 
shooter at the battle of Bennington, and served at 
other times and places during the Revolutionary war. 

PARKER, JOHN FORD. 

(No. no. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Norwich. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY PARKER, who com- 
manded the state man-of-war "Oliver Cromwell," a 
frigate built at Say brook in 1776, by authority of the 
Governor and Council. The vessel made several suc- 
cessful cruises, and, under the command of Captain 
Parker, captured the "Admiral Keppel" of eighteen 
guns, April 13, 1778. 

PARKER, ROBERT PRESCOTT. 
(No. 803. Admitted April 18, i8gj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; salesman; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of TITUS PECK. ^See Parker, 
Burton.'] 

Also, great - great - grandson of MATTHEW 
PARKER. [See Parker, Burton.'] 

PARKER, TIMOTHY. 

(No. III. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Wauregan, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hopeville, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY PARKER. [See 
Parker, John Eord.] 

PARMELE, GEORGE LUTHER. 

(No. ig6. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; dental and oral surgeon; born at Meriden, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL PARMELE, of Guil- 
ford, Connecticut (1737 ), a private soldier in Cap- 
tain Dunning's company, in the 13th regiment of 
militia, at New York, 1776. 



4S3 

Also, great-grandson of EBENEZER GRAVES, 
Sergeant of a company that marched from Guilford, in 
the Lexington alarm, 1775. 

PAYNE, GEORGE WASHINGTON. 

(No. lOSQ. Admitted Oct. 15, i8g^.) Of Unionville, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Farmington, Connecticut. 

Son of JOHN PAYNE, of Southhold, Shelter 
Island, New York (1761-1837), who served as a cabin 
boy on a privateer fitted out at Sag Harbor, Long 
Island, under letters of marque issued by the govern- 
ment when the British troops occupied Long Island 
in that vicinity. 

PEARL, EDWARD. 

(No. 'J12. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of South Willing- 
ton, Connecticut; clerk; born at Albany, New York. 

Grandson of EREDERICK PEARL, of Willington, 
Connecticut (i 762-1847), a private soldier in Captain 
Jonathan Parker's company, in the 2d regiment, Con- 
necticut line, formation of 1777-81, commanded by 
Colonel Charles Webb, from January 22, 1777, to Janu- 
ary 22, 1780. This regiment wintered at Valley Forge, 
1777-78, and was present at the battle of Monmouth. 
He was also Sergeant in Captain Israel Converse's 
company in the militia regiment commanded by Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Levi Wells in October, 1780. 

PEARNE, WESLEY ULYSSES. 

(No. 124. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; attorney-at-law; born at New York city. 

Great-great-grandson of EDWARD SHIP MAN, of 

Say brook, Connecticut, in 1775, a Captain in the 7th 
Connecticut. When this regiment was reorganized as 
the 19th Continental, he continued in the service. This 
regiment was engaged in the battles of White Plains, 
Trenton, and in part, at Princeton. He turned out in 



454 

July, 1779, at the head of his company in the 7th regi- 
ment, Connecticut militia, to repel the enemy at New 
Haven, and in the same year he was made Major of 
that regiment. In 178T he commanded a battalion 
raised for the defense of the coast, which, in July,, 
joined Washington at Phillipsburg. 

PEARSON, EDWARD JOSEPH. 

(No. 48g. Admitted May 4, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JOHN SAUNDERS, of Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts (1757-1844), who was with the army 
before Boston at the time of the evacuation of the city 
by the British forces, and with the army under 
General Gates when Burgoyne surrendered. 

PECK, CHARLES. 

(No. J2p. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at New Britain. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL PECK, of Milford, 
Connecticut (1736-1822), Captain of the 3d company 
in the 5th battalion, commanded by Colonel William 
Douglas, raised to reinforce Washington's army in 
New York, in 1776. It served on the right of the line 
of works during the battle of Long Island, August 27, 
was engaged in the retreat to New York, August 29- 
30, at Kip's Bay on the East river, at the time of the 
enemy's attack, September 15, and at White Plains 
October 28, 1776. 

PECK, JOEL WARD SIMMONS. 

(No. 1060. Admitted Sept. 16, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; broker; born at North Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 

Grandson of WARD PECK (1762-1842), of New 
Haven, Connecticut, who enlisted February 25, 1777, 
in the company of Captain Jonas Prentice, in the 6th 



455 

reg-iment, Connecticut line, in which he served under 
Colonels Douglas, Meigs and Swift to 1781. From 
January i, to December 31, 1781, he served in the com- 
pany of Captain Samuel Augustus Barker in the Con- 
necticut Light Infantry, the company being one of 
those assigned for service under the Marquis de La- 
fayette at the southward. He continued in the army 
until discharged, June 8, 1783, when he received a 
badge of merit for six years' faithful service and was 
granted a pension. Among other battles he was at 
Stony Point, Jamestown and Yorktown. 

PECK, MILES LEWIS. 

(No. s66. Admitted Sept. zy, i8gi.) Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Bristol. 

Great-grandson of LAMENT PECK, of Farmington, 
Connecticut (1751-1823), who was a member of Cap- 
tain Noadiah Hooker's company, in the 2d Connecti- 
cut regiment, in 1775. Detachments of officers and 
men of this regiment were engaged in the battle of 
Bunker Hill, June 17, and in Arnold's Quebec expe- 
dition. 

PECK, SANFORD J. 

(No, 42g. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Brooklyn, New 
York; insurance broker; born at Brooklyn. 

Great-grandson of PHINEAS PECK (1743 ), 

who was a Captain in the army of General Gates, and 
was present at the surrender of Burgoyne. 

Also, great-grandson of BARNEY DE LAFAY- 
ETTE MARQUISSEE, a Major in the Revolutionary 
army. 

PELTIER, FREDERIC DESNOYERS. 

(No. '/88. Admitted April 18, 18^3.) Of New York 
city; wholesale merchant; born at Clifton Springs, 
New York. 



45^ 

Great-grandson of JAMES PARMELE, of Killing- 
worth, Connecticut (1757-1842). He served three 
years or more in the Revolutionary army and partici- 
pated the fighting about New York in 1776, and later 
in New Jersey. He was present at the battle of Mon- 
mouth. 

PELTON, HENRY HUBBARD. 
(No. 714. Admitted Jan. 6, iSgj.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; student; born at Middletown. 

Great-great-grandson of ABNER PELTON, of 
Middletown, Connecticut (1755-1846), a private soldier, 
who participated in the battle of Long Island, and 
was with the army under Washington at the evacua- 
tion of New York city. 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA HUBBARD. \^See 
Hubbard^ Josiah Afeigs.'\ 

PELTON, JAMES H. 

(No. 402. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Portland. 

Great-grandson of ABNER PELTON. \^See Pelton, 
LLenry LLubbard.~\ 

PERKINS, CHARLES SMITH. 

(No. 8ji. Admitted Feb. 22, 18Q3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bank teller; born at New Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of WALTER BOOTH. ySee Bevins, 
Le Grand.] 

PERKINS, WARREN SHUBAL. 

(No. 430. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; clergyman; born at Waterford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson oi JOHN PERKLNS (175 1 ), 

of Groton, Connecticut, a private in Captain Water- 
man's company, in the 20th regiment of militia. 



457 

PERRY, HENRY HOYT. 

(No, 4^2. Admitted May 4^ i8gi.) Of SoTithport, Con- 
necticut; bank teller; born at Southport. 

Great-great-grandson of PETER P ENFIELD, S^See 
Hoyt, Henry Thacher.^ 

PERRY, JOHN HOYT. 

(No. 4pj. Admitted May 4, iSpi.) Of Southport, Con- 
necticut; Judge of the Court of Common Pleas; born 
at Southport. 

Great-great-grandson of PETER PENFIELD. ^See 
Hoyt, Henry Thacher.'\ 

PERRY, WINTHROP HOYT. 

(No. 4pi. Ad^nitted May 4, i8gi.) Of Southport, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Southport. 

Great-great-grandson of PETER PENFIELD. \^See 
Hoyt^ Henry Thacher.'] 

PETTIBONE, WILLIAM FRANKLIN. 
(No. my. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Hartford. 

Great -great -grandson of Colonel JONATHAN 
PETTIBONE. \^See Campbell, Mrs. Mary Cornelia 
Pettibone.'] 

*PHELPS, ALFRED WILLIAM. 

(No. Y4. Admitted April 23, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at Hebron, Connecticut. Died 
August 9, 1896. 

Son of ERASTUS PHELPS, a private in the Revo- 
lutionary war. \^See obituary, Year Book, i8pj-d.] 

PHELPS, ANTOINETTE RANDOLPH. 

(No. 5p<5. Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Simsbury, Connecticut. 



458 

Great-granddaughter of NOAH PHELPS, of Sims- 

iDury, Connecticut (1740 ). Shortly after the fight 

at Lexington in April, 1775, a plan was formed at 
Hartford for the capture of Ticonderoga and Crown 
Point, that "we might have the advantage of the can- 
non that were there to relieve the people of Boston." 
Sundry gentlemen connected with the General Assem- 
bly, then in session, on their individual notes procured 
money from the treasury for this expedition, and 
Noah Phelps, at that time a Captain of militia, was 
one of a " committee of war " commissioned to carry 
the project into execution. By authority of this com- 
mittee the command of the force engaged was given 
to Colonel Ethan Allen. The day before the capture 
was accomplished. Captain Noah Phelps disguised 
himself, entered the fort in the character of a country- 
man desiring to be shaved, and obtained full informa- 
tion concerning the situation within the walls. He 
participated in the capture the next morning. May 10, 
1775. In 1776 he commanded a company in Colonel 
Andrew Ward's regiment, which joined Washington's 
army in New York in August. It was stationed at 
first near Fort Lee, marched to White Plains and into 
New Jersey, took part in the battles of Trenton and 
Princeton, and encamped at Morristown the following 
winter. He was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
i8th regiment, Connecticut militia, in 1778, and Col- 
onel of the same regiment in 1779. 

PHELPS, CHARLES GUSTAVUS. 

(No. 775. Admitted Oct. 18, i8g2.) Of Wallingford, 
Connecticut; stenographer; born at Wallingford. 

Great-great-grandson of ISAAC COOK, Jr., of Wal- 
lingford, Connecticut (1739-1810). In 1775 he was 
Captain of the 7th company in the regiment com- 
manded by General David Wooster, which in the lat- 
ter part of June went to Harlem, and in September 



459 

marched to the northern department, took part in the 
operations along Lakes George and Champlain, as- 
sisted in the reduction of St. Johns and was after- 
wards stationed, in part, in Montreal. He was ap- 
pointed Major of the loth regiment, Connecticut 
militia, in 1780, and was made Lieutenant-Colonel in 
June, 1783. 

PHELPS, DRYDEN WILLIAM. 

(No. jp2. Admitted October 21, i8qo.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; clergyman; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of JUDAH PHELPS (1750-1818), 
who enlisted in the Simsbury company of the 2d 
Connecticut regiment, commanded by Colonel Joseph 
Spencer, as a private soldier. May 6, 1775. This regi- 
ment was at Boston, and a detachment from it served 
at Bunker Hill. 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM LYON (1748- 
1830), a member of the 2d company of Governor's 
Foot Guards of New Haven, which marched for Cam- 
bridge on the Lexington alarm. After the war, he 
was Captain of this company, and, later, a Colonel of 
militia. 



ili/lZui^W 




omy 



PHELPS, JEFFERY ORSON, Jr. 

(No. 323. Admitted April 24, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Iowa Mortgage company; 
born at Simsbury, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of NOAH PHELPS. \^See 
Phelps^ Antoinette Randolph^ 



460 

PHELPS, ROSWELL HARVEY. 

(No. SI- Admitted April 22^ i88g.) Of East Granby, 
Connecticut; born in (now) East Granby. 

Great-grandson of ROSWELL PHELPS, a private 
soldier in the Revolutionary war, and after the close of 
the war a Captain of militia. 

Also, great-grandson of RLCHARD GA Y. [See Gay, 
Frank Butler.'] 

*PHELPS, SYLVANUS DRYDEN. 

(JVo. jp2. Admitted Oct. 21, i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; clergyman; born at Suffield, Connecti- 
cut. Died November 23, 1895. 

Grandson of JUDAH PHELPS. [See Year Book, 
i8pj-4, p. 348, and obituary^ Year Book^ i8ps-d.^ 

PICKETT, RUFUS STARR. 

fJVo. 4JI. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; attorney-at-law; born at Ridgefield, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of ABRAHAM PARSONS (1763-1852), of 
Redding, Connecticut, a private in Captain Charles 
Smith's company of General Waterbury's Connecti- 
cut brigade, 1781. He was in the engagements at 
White Plains and at Horse Neck. 

PIERPONT, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. 211. Admitted April 24, i88p.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at London, Ontario. 

Grandson of EVELYN PLERPONT, 2d Lieutenant 
in company of matrosses raised for the defense of 
New Haven. At the time of Tryon's invasion this 
company was stationed partly in the town and partly 
in East Haven and West Haven. 



461 

PIERSON, DECIUS LATIMER. 
(No. 1 1 18. Admitted March 23, i8p6.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Meriden, Connecticut. 

Great-great-great-grandson of JONATHAN PET- 
TI BONE. ySee Campbell, Mrs. Mary Cornelia Fettibone.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of JONATHAN FET- 
TIBONE, 2d (1747-1821), of Simsbury, Connecticut, 
who was an Ensign in the ist company of Continental 
troops raised in Simsbury, commanded by Captain 
Abel Pettibone, which marched to the relief of Boston 
in May, 1775, being the 2d company of the 2d regi- 
ment, under command of General Spencer, detach- 
ments of which served at Bunker Hill and in Arnold's 
expedition to Quebec. His service was from May i, 
1775, to December 10, 1775, In 1776 he served as 2d 
Lieutenant in the 2 2d Continental regiment, formerly 
the 2d regiment, Connecticut line, and was promoted 
to I St Lieutenant during the year. This regiment, 
under command of Colonel Wyllys, was in the battle 
of Long Island and at White Plains. He was also 
appointed Lieutenant of the ist company or train- 
band of the 1 8th regiment of militia in May, 1778, 
and in August, 1779, he was appointed Captain in Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Mead's regiment. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILIIAM WILCOX 
(1727-1775), of Simsbury, Connecticut, who was a 
Lieutenant in the company of Captain Amos Wilcox, 
which marched from Simsbury in the Lexington alarm. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WAIT LA TTEMORE 
(or Latimer) (1741-1804), of Simsbury, Connecticut, 
who was a private in the company commanded by Ser- 
geant Goodwin in the i8th Connecticut militia regi- 
ment, which marched to New York in the summer of 
1776 to reinforce General Washington. 

PITKIN, (MRS.) SARA HOWARD LOOMIS. 

(iV'o. 202. Admitted Sept. d, i88g.) Wife of Albert Hast- 
ings Pitkin, of Hartford, Connecticut. 

31 



462 

Great-great-granddaughter of JONATHAN 
LOOMIS, of Lebanon, Connecticut, a private soldier 
in the company of Captain James Clark, in the 3d Con- 
necticut regiment — General Putnam's — in 1775, who 
participated in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

Also,great-granddaughter oi ABRAHAM THA YER, 
who served from Massachusetts in the Revolutionary 
army from April 19, 1775, until the close of the war. 

Also, great-granddaughter of SAMUEL ARNOLD, 
a soldier of the Revolution from Weymouth, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Also, great-granddaughter of MARTLN DENS- 
LOW, a soldier from Windsor, Connecticut, in the 
Lexington alarm, and in the same year a Corporal in 
the 4th company of the 8th regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Huntington. He was a Sergeant, April i, 
1777, in the 5th regiment, Connecticut line, formation 
of 1777-1781; Sergeant-Major, May 15, 1779; Ensign, 
August 16, 1779. He was a Lieutenant when he 
retired from the service, July 22, 1782. The 5th Con- 
necticut went into camp at Peekskill in the spring of 
1777, and in September was ordered to Pennsylvania. 
It was engaged in the battle of Germantown, and 
wintered at Valley Forge; in June, 1778, it participated 
in the battle of Monmouth; it served in Heath's wing, 
on the east side of the Hudson in 1779; wintered at 
Morristown in 1 779-1780, and in the following sum- 
mer served with the main army on both sides of the 
Hudson. 

^PLANT, SAMUEL ORRIN. 

(No. 717, Admitted March 16, i8gi.) Of Branf ord, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Branford. Died July i, 1892. 
Grandson of ABRAM PLANT. \See Year Book, iSgj 
-4, PP' 349^406.) 

PLATT, JAMES PERRY. 

(No. 767. Admitted Feb. 22, iSgj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Towanda, Pennsylvania. 



4^3 

Great-grandson of JOHN PLATT (1752-1833), of 
Newtown, Connecticut, a private in the 8th company 
of the 5th Connecticut regiment. Colonel Waterbury's, 
in 1775, in service at New York and in the northern 
department. 

PLATT, JOHN HENRY. 

(No. p//. Adinitted Feb. 11, iSg^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Prospect, Connecticut. 
Great-grandson of BENJAMIN PLATT (1756- 
1808), of Milford, Connecticut, who served in the com- 
pany of Captain Charles Smith, in General Water- 
bury's brigade, which took part in the defense of Dan- 
bury, where he was severely wounded. 

PLATT, ORVILLE HITCHCOCK. 

(No. 456. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; United States Senator; born at Washington, 
Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOHN PLA TT. ^See Piatt, James Perry. \ 

PLIMPTON, FREDERICK. 

(No. 1061. Admitted Sept. 16, 18^5.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of corporation; born at Thompson, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of OLIVER PLIMPTON (1753- 
1832), of Sturbridge, Massachusetts, who enlisted from 
Worcester, Massachusetts, and served as a Corporal 
from March 10, 1777, to March 10, 1780, in the com- 
pany of Captain Adam Martin, in the regiment of the 
Massachusetts Continental line, commanded by Colonel 
Timothy Bigelow. His widow was granted a pension 
for his services. 

PLIMPTON, JAMES MANNING. 

(No. 1062. Admitted Sept. 16, 1893.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Thompson, Con- 
necticut. 



464 

Great-grandson of OLIVER PLIMPTON. {^See 
Plimpton^ Frederick?^ 

PLIMPTON, LINUS BACON. 

(No. 1063. Admitted Sept. 16, i8gs-) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of corporation; born at South- 
bridge, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of OLIVER PLIMPTON. {^See Plimpton, 
Frederick.'] 

POMEROY, CHARLES BACKUS. 

(No. p/f?. Admitted Feb. 11, iSp^.) Of Willimantic, Con- 
necticut; sheriff of Windham County; born at Som- 
ers, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JABEZ COLLINS (1744-1839), of 
Somers, Connecticut, who served as clerk in the com- 
pany of Captain Emory Pease, of Somers, Connecti- 
cut, which marched to Boston in April, 1775, on the 
LexingtOD alarm. He also, in 1776, served five months 
as Sergeant in the companies of Captains Abiel Pease 
and Peter Kibbe, and was in the engagement at Har- 
lem Heights. He was a pensioner. 

POND, DeWITT CLINTON. 
(No. 171. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; bookseller; born at Poultney, Vermont. 

Grandson of ABEL POND (1753 ), a minute- 
man, who marched from Lenox, Massachusetts, in Cap- 
tain Charles Debbell's company, April 22, 1775. ^^ 
served, also, as a private soldier in Captain Ezra Whit- 
tlesey's company of Berkshire County militia from 
September 7 to September 30, 1777; and under the 
same Captain, as Corporal in the alarm of October, 1780. 
He was present at the capture of Fort Ticonderogaby 
the Connecticut expedition under command of Ethan 
Allen. 



4^5 

POND, JONATHAN WALTER. 
(No. 615. Admitted Jan. 18, 18^2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at Plymouth, Connecticut. 

Grandson of LUKE ADAMS (i 756-1831), of Water- 
bury, Connecticut, who enlisted in 1776, in the com- 
pany of Captain John Lewis, Jr., in the 5th battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade, commanded by Colonel William 
Douglas, and during this term of service participated 
in the battle of White Plains. He was also a private 
soldier and Corporal in the 6th regiment, Connecticut 
line, formation of 1777-1781, commanded by Colonel 
Return Jonathan Meigs, for three years from May 14, 
1777. 

POND, PHILIP, 2D. 

(No. 367. Admitted Sept. 75, i8pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of JOEL WHITE, of Bolton, 
Connecticut (i 705-1 789), chairman of committee of 
correspondence, inspection and safety during the Rev- 
olutionary war. In the early part of the war he loaned 
£3,000 to the State of Connecticut and the United 
States. He was for some twenty-six sessions a mem- 
ber of the Connecticut General Assembly. 

POND, WALTER. 

(No. s^8. Admitted Sept. zj-, i8pi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; attorney-at-law; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of JOEL WHITE. [See Fond, 
Philip, 2d.] 

PORTER, JOHN ADDISON. 
(No. 144. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; editor; born at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson oi DAVID FOP TEP, of Uehvon, 

Connecticut (1761 ), a private soldier in the 6th 

company of the 8th Connecticut regiment, 1775. 



466 

*PORTER, NOAH. 

(No. 432. Admitted Feb. 2, i8qi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; ex-president of Yale College; born at Farm- 
ington, Connecticut. Died March 4, 1892. 

Grandson of GILES MEIGS. ^See Year Book, i8g2, 

pp. 20p, 2dl.] 

POWERS, HARRY STEWART. 

(No. 641. Admitted Feb. 22^18^2.) Of South Windsor, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at Danbury, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of ABIEL WOLCOTT, of East 
Windsor, Connecticut (i 761-1840), who served as fifer 
in the 2d regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by 
Colonel Zebulon Butler, from July 15 to December 9, 
1780. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILLIAM WOL- 
COTT, of East Windsor, Connecticut (1711-1799), 
chairman of the county committee of observation 
(1775-1776), and member of the Connecticut General 
Assembly, 1775-1778. 

Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL TUDOR 
(1737-1822), Lieutenant of a company from the town of 
East Windsor, Connecticut, which marched for Bos- 
ton in the Lexington alarm. 

POWERS, TUDOR WOLCOTT. 

(No. 4go. Admitted May 4, i8pi.) Of South Windsor^ 
Connecticut; stenographer; born at Mittineague, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Great-grandson oi ABIEL WOLCOTT. [See Poivers, 
Harry Stewart.'] 

Also, great - great - grandson of WILLIAM WOL- 
COTT. \_See Bowers, Harry Stewart.] 

Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL TUDOR. 
[See Bowers, Harry Stewart.] 



467 

PRATT, THOMAS STRONG. 

(No. 483. Admitted April 21, i8gi.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; journalist; born at Adams, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of BENJAMIN PRATT, of Reading, 
Massachusetts (i 758-1 842), who served in Rhode 
Island, and was present at the battle of White Plains. 



PRENTIS, EDWARD. 

(No. pjg. Admitted Feb. 11, i8ps-) Of New London, 
Connecticut; dentist; born at New London. 

Great-great-grandson of GUY RICHARDS (1722- 
1782), of New London, Connecticut, who served on the 
New London committee of correspondence under ap- 
pointment of January 22, 1776, and on the committee 
of safety under appointment of March 31, 1777. 

Also, great - great - grandson of EZEKIEL MUL- 
FORD (1727-1819), of East Hampton, Long Island, 
who was Captain of the 12th company of the Suffolk 
County regiment commanded by Colonel Smith, which 
was engaged in the battle of Long Island. He was 
complimented by General Washington for his courage 
in leading a dangerous ambuscade and for the manner 
in which he led his company in action. 

Also, great-great-grandson of EIISHA Z^^ (1740- 

), of Lyme, Connecticut, who served for thirty 

days in the Lexington alarm as Sergeant in the com- 
pany commanded by Captain Jewett. He also served 
from May i to December 19, 1775, as Lieutenant of the 
8th company of the 6th Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Parsons. He re-enlisted in 1776 
and served as ist Lieutenant in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Parsons, being engaged at the 
battle of Long Island in August of that year. He was 
also commissioned, January i, 1777, as Captain in the 
4th regiment, Connecticut line, and served until May 
22, 1778, when he resigned. 



468 

PRESCOTT, (MRS.) CELIA ELLEN KEENEY. 
(No. 603. Admitted Sept. is, i8gi.) Wife of William 
Henry Prescott, of Rockville, Connecticut; born at 
Ellington, Connecticut. 

Great-great-granddaughter of RICHARD PITKIN, 
of Hartford, Connecticut (1739-1799), who served as 
Lieutenant in a company which marched from Hart- 
ford in the Lexington alarm. He was also a Lieuten- 
ant of the 6th company in Colonel Erastus Wolcott's 
regiment, which was at Boston from January to 
March, 1776, and formed a part of the army that 
occupied the city after its evacuation by the British 
forces. 

Also, great-great-great-granddaughter of JOSEPH 
PITKIN^ who manufactured powder for the Revolu- 
tionary army. 

PRESCOTT, LIDA PORTER. 

(No. s6g. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; born at Rockville. 

Great-great-granddaughter of JAMES PRESCOTT, 
of Hampton Falls, New Hampshire (i 733-1813), who 
was a Lieutenant in Captain Moses Leavitt's company, 
in Colonel Abraham Drake's New Hampshire regi- 
ment, raised to reinforce the northern army near 
Saratoga. This regiment served from September 8th 
to December, 1777, and was in service at the time of 
Burgoyne's surrender. 

Also, great-great-great-granddaughter of RICHARD 
PITKIN. \^See Prescott, Celia Ellen Keeney.] 

PRESCOTT, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. s/o. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Of Rockville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Loudon, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Great-grandson of JAMES PRESCOTT. \^See Pres- 
cott, lida Porter.^ 



4^9 

PRESTON, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No. 1024. Admitted July 75, iSgS-) O^ New Haven, 
Connecticut; registrar of births, marriages and deaths; 
born at Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of NOAH BOUTON (1743- 
1812), of South East, New York, who was a private sol- 
dier in the 3d Dutchess County, New York, regiment, 
commanded by Colonel John Field, once in the com- 
pany commanded by Captain Joseph Dykeman, and 
once in the company commanded by Captain David 
Hecock. He was afterwards ist Lieutenant in the 2d 
Westchester regiment, commanded by Colonel Thomas, 
and in the Pound Ridge company commanded by 
Captain Joseph Lockwood, both of these regiments 
being in active service. 

PROUDMAN, ARTHUR WILLIS. 

(No. 80s. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; mechanic; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of AMOS HUNTING, of Dedham 
and Shutesbury, Massachusetts (1763-1846), who served 
from July 15, 1780, to January 3, 1781. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

PULSIFER, NATHAN TROWBRIDGE. 

(No. 147. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Manchester, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Newton, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL PULSIFER, of 
Gloucester, a private in the Massachusetts militia. 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL TROWBRIDGE, 
of Newton, Massachusetts, a Lieutenant in the Massa- 
chusetts militia. 

PUNDERSON, SAMUEL FULLER. 

(No. 433. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at New Haven. 



470 

Great-great-grandson of HEMAN SWIFT, of Corn- 
wall, Connecticut (1733-1814). He was commissioned 
January i, 1777, Colonel of the 7tli regiment, Connecti- 
cut line, which he commanded from 1777 to 1781. The 
regiment went into the field in the spring of 1777, and 
was stationed at Peekskill. After the defeat of the 
main army at Brandy wine in September, 1777, it was 
sent with others to reinforce General Washington. It 
participated in the battle of Germantown as a part of 
Greene's division on the left flank, where it encoun- 
tered the enemy's light infantry. It wintered at Val- 
ley Forge, 1777-8, and in the following summer it was 
present at the battle of Monmouth. From. 1781-83 he 
was Colonel of the 2d regiment, Connecticut line, and 
from January to December, 1783, Colonel of the 2d 
regiment, Connecticut line, third formation. He had 
command of a brigade in Washington's army at 
Phillipsburgh in 1781. By act of Congress, September 
30, 1783, he was made Brevet Brigadier-General. He 
was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 

PUTNAM, ALBERT DAY. 

(No. 366. Admitted Sept. 10, i8po.) Of Danielson, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Brooklyn, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ISRAEL PUTNAM. [See 
Hewitt, Elisha.'] 

QUINLEY, CHARLES GORDON. 

(No. j6y. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Newark, New 
Jersey; stock-broker; born at New Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of ABIJAH HUBBARD (1755- 
), of Middletown, Connecticut. He was among 



the first to march on the Lexington alarm, and fought 
at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775; at Brandywine, Septem- 
ber II, 1777; Germantown, October 4, 1777; Monmouth, 
June 28, 1778; and Fort St. George, November 21, 1780. 



471 

He was made a Corporal in 1778, Sergeant, November 
I, 1780, and later was offered a commission as Ensign, 
which he declined. 

QUINLEY, GURDON WHITMORE. 

(No. jjj. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; machinist; born at Middletown, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of ABIJAH HUBBARD. \See Quinley, 
Charles Gordon?^ 

QUINTARD, CHARLES AUGUSTUS. 

(No. 32Q. Admitted June i^, i8gi.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; secretary; born at Norwalk. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY WHITNEY, of Nor- 
walk, Connecticut (i 744-1 825), musician in Captain 
Gregory's company of the 9th Connecticut, serving 
under General Wooster, 1776-77. 

Also, great-great-grandson of EBENEZER ALLEN, 
a private soldier in Captain Mills' company, in the 2d 
regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel 
Charles Webb. This regiment wintered at Valley 
Forge, 1777-78, and was present at the battle of Mon- 
mouth. 

Also, great-grandson of WOLCOTT PATCHEN, 
who enlisted for the war, February 5, 1777, in the 5th 
regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel 
Philip Burr Bradley. This regiment was engaged in 
the battle of Germantown, October 4, 1777, and passed 
the following winter at Valley Forge. In 1778 it was 
present at the battle of Monmouth. In the formation 
of 1781-83 this regiment became part of the 2d regi- 
ment, Connecticut line, which was commanded by 
Colonel Heman Swift. Wolcott Patchen was a mem- 
ber of a company commanded by Captain Elijah Chap- 
man, detached from the regiment to serve under 
Lafayette for the purpose of checking Arnold's 



472- 

invasion of Virginia. At the siege of Yorktown 
Lafayette's division held the post of honor, on the 
right of the investing line. 

QUINTARD, FREDERICK HOMER. 

(No. 330. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of South Nor walk, 
Connecticut; secretary; born at Norwalk, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY WHITNEY. ^See 
Qutntard, Charles Augustus.^ 

QUINTARD, HENRY HARRISON. 
(No. 22. Admitted April 2, i88q.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Norwalk, Connecticut. 

Son of JAMES QUINTARD, of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut, a soldier of the Revolution. 

RAYMOND, GILBERT SMITH. 

(No. (p8o. Admitted June 11, 18^4.) Of Preston, Con- 
necticut; law student; born at Preston. 

Great-grandson of JOHN RA YMOND, a Lieuten- 
ant in the 5th company of the 6th Connecticut regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel Parsons, in 1775. 

REDFIELD, EDWARD WALKER. 

{No. 6^6. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Essex, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of savings bank; born at Essex. 

Grandson of ROSWEII REDEIEID (1763-1838), 
of Killingworth, Connecticut, a private soldier, who 
entered service in 1778, and was finally discharged in 
1781. 

REDFIELD, HENRY SHERMAN. 

(No. 6^7. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; note broker; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of ROSWEIL REDFIELD. \^See 
Red field, Edward Walker^ 



473 

REDFIELD, WILLIAM THOMPSON. 

(No. ^14. Admitted April 77, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of ELISHA ELDERKIN, of Kil- 
lingworth, Connecticut (i 753-1822), a Sergeant in Cap- 
tain Jonas Prentice's 5th company, 5tli battalion, 
Wadsworth's brigade, 1776. 

REMBERT, JOHN RAPHAEL. 

(No. ^55. Admitted April 24, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Wallingford, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN MANSFIELD, a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. 

*REYNOLDS, JOSEPH G. 

(No. 4^7. Admitted Feb. 18, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; carriage-maker; born at Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Died March 21, 1892. 

Grandson of JOHN REYNOLDS. ^See Year Book, 
1S93-4, P' 357-] 

REYNOLDS, WILLIAM THOMAS. 

(No. 46^. Admitted March 16, i8pi.) Of North Haven, 
Connecticut; minister; born at West Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of Lieutenant JAMES REY- 
NOLDS. {See Foote, Ellsworth Irving.'] 

RHOADES, DAVID PECK. 

(No. iiip. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; born at Milford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL PECK. {See Feck, 
Charles?^ 



474 

RICE, FREDERICK BENJAMIN. 

(No. 872. Admitted Feb. 12, 1894.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; real estate dealer; born at Hudson, Ohio. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL BRONSON, of Pros- 
pect, Connecticut (i 742-1813), a Captain in Lieutenant- 
Colonel Baldwin's regiment, Connecticut militia. 

RICH, JOHN S. 

(No. p8i. Admitted Oct. 10, 18^4.) Of Rochester, New 
York; farmer; born at Manchester, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of WHITE GRISWOLD. \^See Abell, 
Mrs. Mary Kingsbury^ 

-RICHARDSON, WILLIAM MONTAGUE. 

(No. 1120. Admitted Feb. j, i8pd.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; accountant; born at Brookfield, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of EZEKIEL RICHARDSON (1746- 
1830), of Wrentham, Massachusetts, who served for 
eight months from April 27, 1775, as a private in the 
company of Captain John Boyd, under Colonels Heath 
and Greaton, and afterwards as Sergeant in the com- 
pany of Captain Lewis Whiting, under Colonel Eph- 
raimWheelock, encamped at Ticonderoga in 1776. He 
was also Sergeant in the company of Captain Amos 
Ellis, under Colonel Benjamin Howe, from July 26, 
to August 6, 1778, in service in Rhode Island. 

RIPLEY, CHARLES STEDMAN. 

(No. 577. Admitted Sept. 75, i8pi.) Of Chicago, Illi- 
nois; Lieutenant in the United States Navy; born at 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Great-great-great-grandson of JABEZ HUNTING- 
TON. \^See Bond, William Williams.'] 

RIPLEY, JAY FRANCIS. 

(No. 2y2. Admitted March 2p, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at West Springfield, Pennsyl- 
vania. 



475 

Great-grandson of JOHN RIPLEY, of Windham 

and Hartford, Connecticnt (1738 ), Captain of the 

loth company in the 8th Connecticut regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington, 1775. This 
regiment was stationed on the Sound until September 
14, when it was ordered to the Boston camps and took 
post at Roxbury, where it remained until the expira- 
tion of its term of service, December, 1775. ^^ 177^ 
he was commissioned Major of the battalion com- 
manded by Colonel Chester, raised to reinforce Wash- 
ington in New York. This battalion was engaged in 
the battle of Long Island, in the retreat from New 
York, and the fighting at White Plains. In 1777 he 
served in Rhode Island, under Brigadier-General John 
Douglas, as Brigade-Major. 

RIPLEY, LEWIS WILLIAM. 

(No. 260. Admitted March ^p, i8qo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at South Windsor, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN RIPLEY. \^See Ripley, 
Jay Francis^ 

RISLEY, ELI HARVEY, Jr. 

(No. g82. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of South Man- 
chester, Connecticut; photographer; born at Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 

Great-grandson of N EH EM I AH RISLEY (1762- 
1813), of Manchester, Connecticut, who entered ser- 
vice at Hartford, May 21, 1781, in the company of Cap- 
tain Samuel Granger, of General David Waterbury's 
brigade. 

*RISLEY, OLIVER HUMPHREY KING. 

(No. 5J2. Admitted June 75, i8pi.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; banker; born at Vernon, Connecticut. 
Died April 12, 1895, 



476 



ee 



Great-grandson of N EH EM I AH RISLEY, [6^, 
Year Book, 1893-4, p. J5c5'.] 



ROACH, ALBERT OWEN. 

(No. 1141. Admitted April 21, 1896.) Of Mystic, Con- 
necticut; machinist; born at Ledyard, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS ROACH (17 1855), 

of Ledyard, Connecticut, who enlisted July 15, 1780, 
in the company of Captain John Shumway, in the ist 
regiment, Connecticut line, commanded by Colonel 
Wilson, and served for six months on the Hudson. 
He was a pensioner. 

ROBBINS, EDWARD DENMORE. 
(No. 201. Admitted Feb. 4, i8pi.) Of Wethersfield, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Wethersfield. 

Great-great-grandson of RICHARD ROBBINS, of 
Wethersfield, Connecticut (1738 ), a private sol- 
dier in Colonel Samuel B. Webb's regiment, July 23 to 
August 12, 1780. 

ROBBINS, PHILEMON WADSWORTH. 

(No. yy. Admitted April 30, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of FREDERICK ROBBINS, of 
Wethersfield, Connecticut ( 1756-182 1), a private sol- 
dier in the 9th company of the 2d Connecticut regi- 
ment. General Spencer's, in 1775. He fought in the 
trenches at Bunker Hill. 

ROBBINS, THOMAS WILLIAMS. 

(No. 873. Admitted Sept. 12, 1893.) Of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut; farmer; born at Wethersfield. 

Grandson of ELISHA WILIIAMS, of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut (1759-1847), who enlisted May 5, 1775, in 



477 

Captain Wyllys' company, 2d Connecticut regiment, 
under command of General Joseph Spencer. He re- 
ceived a pension in 1832, 

ROBERTS, GEORGE. 
(No, S97' Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of GEORGE ROBERTS, of East 
Hartford, Connecticut (1752-1824), a member of the 
company of Captain Jonathan Wells, in the Connecti- 
cut regiment commanded by Colonel Erastus Wolcott, 
January to March, 1776. This regiment was before 
Boston when that city was evacuated by the British 
forces. 

ROBERTS, HENRY. 

(No. 5pc?. Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Brooklyn, New York. 
Great-grandson of GEORGE ROBERTS. [See Rob- 
erts, George.] 

ROBINSON, HENRY CORNELIUS. 

(No. i8g. Admitted Feb. 4, i8po.J Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY ROBINSON. [See 
Cooley, Francis Rexford.] 

ROBINSON, HENRY SEYMOUR. 

(No. 116. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY ROBINSON, 
[See Cooley, Francis Rexford.] 

ROBINSON, JOHN TRUMBULL. 

(No. 718. Admitted Sept. 13, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY ROBINSON. 
[See Cooky, Francis Rexford.] 
32 



478 

ROBINSON, LUCIUS FRANKLIN. 

(No. iij. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY ROBINSON. 
\^See Cooley, Francis Rexford.\ 

ROCKWELL, CHARLES LEE. 

(No. yip. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; cashier of the First National Bank; born at 
Ridgefield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JAMES ROCKWELL, of Ridge- 
field, Connecticut (1750-1808), Lieutenant of the 2d 
company of the alarm list in the i6th Connecticut 
regiment in 1780. 

ROCKWELL, GEORGE. 

(No. ^41. Admitted Jan. 26, i8gj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; auditor of corporation; born 'at Ridgefield, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JAMES ROCKWELL. [See Rock- 
well, Charles Lee.'] 

ROCKWELL, WARREN AYRES. 

(No. 720. Admitted Sept. 13, i8g2.) Of Harriman, Ten- 
nessee; bookkeeper; born at Gundelsheim, Wurtem- 
burg. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL DENNY, of 
Leicester, Massachusetts (1731-1817). In 1775 he was 
Lieutenant-Colonel of a regiment of Minute-men 
which marched from Boston in the Lexington alarm. 
In the following year he was elected Colonel of the ist 
regiment of the county of Worcester, Massachusetts, 
and in September detailed to command a regiment of 
militia ordered to join the northern army. In June, 
1778, a detachment of his regiment was ordered to 
Fishkill for nine months. He was a member of the 
committee of correspondence and public safety in 1775 
and 1778. 



479 

ROCKWELL, WILLIAM FRANCIS. 
(No. 742. Admitted Jan. 26, 1SQ3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Ridgefield, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of JAMES ROCKWELL. [See Rock- 
well^ Charles Lee.^ 

ROCKWOOD, (MRS.) ABBY ANN ABBOT. 

(No. ipS- Admitted Feb. 5, iSgo.) Of Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Granddaughter of JOSEPH HALE (1750 ), a 

Corporal in the company that marched from Coventry, 
Connecticut, in the Lexington alarm. In 1776 he was 
an Ensign in Colonel Ward's regiment, which joined 
Washington's army at New York in August, and was 
stationed at first near Fort Lee. Marching with the 
troops to White Plains and subsequently into New Jer- 
sey, it took part in the battles of Trenton and Prince- 
ton, and encamped with Washington at Morristown. 
In 1777 he was Lieutenant in a Connecticut militia 
regiment, commanded by Colonel John Ely; and in 
1781 he was Lieutenant in a provisional regiment, 
" ordered by the General Assembly to be raised and 
put in readiness to march at the shortest notice, in 
case his excellency. General Washington, shall call for 
them." He was a brother of Nathan Hale, the martyr 
spy. 

ROGERS, ERNEST ELIAS. 

(No. 74J. Admitted Jan. 26, iSgj.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at Waterford, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of DANLEL DODGE, of Salem, 
Connecticut (1757-1807), who turned out from Colches- 
ter in the Lexington alarm in 1775, ^^^d later, in the 
same year joined the 8th Connecticut regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington, which 
served on the Sound until it was ordered to the Boston 



480 

camps. He is believed also to have been a member of 
Colonel Huntington's regiment, reorganized in Jan- 
uary, 1777, as the ist regiment, Connecticut line. This 
regiment participated in the battle of Germantown, 
wintered at Valley Forge, and was present at the 
battle of Monmouth. 

ROGERS, FREDERICK. 

(No. pSj. Admitted Dec. 10, 1894.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Grandson oi PEREZ CETESEBROUGJI {1^62-1^1), 
of Stonington, Connecticut, who enlisted about the 
first of May, 1780, and served for one year as a private 
at the fort in Stonington, Connecticut, in the company 
commanded by Lieutenant Acors Sheffield. He was 
also a sailor on a privateer supposed to have sailed 
from New London. He was twice taken prisoner and 
confined in the Jersey prison ship. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

ROGERS, HORACE. 

(No. jpj. Admitted Oct. 21, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; born at Norwich. 

Grandson oi PEREZ CHESEBROUGH. ^See Rogers, 
Frederick?^ 

Also, great-grandson of Captain ELI SUA EDGER- 
TON, of Norwich, a soldier in the Revolutionary 
army. 

ROOT, (MRS.) ELLA GOODMAN MOSELEY. 

(No. 874. Admitted Sep. 12, 18^3.) Wife of Dr. Joseph 
E. Root of Hartford, Connecticut; born at Hartford. 



481 

Great-granddaughter of AMOS ANDREWS 
WEBSTER, of Berlin, Connecticut(i752-i827), a pri- 
vate soldier under Captain John Chester in Lexington 
alarm, 1775, enlisting from the town of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut. 

ROOT, FRANCIS PITKIN. 

(No. 434. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Barre, Massachu- 
setts; salesman; born at Greenwich, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH ROOT, of Somers, 
Connecticut (1753-1825), a private in the 5th company 
of the 2d Connecticut regiment, 1775. This regiment 
was posted at Roxbury, Massachusetts, and detach- 
ments of officers and men were engaged in the battle 
of Bunker Hill and Arnold's expedition to Quebec. In 
1778 he was a Corporal in Captain Grant's company of 
Colonel Johnson's regiment of militia, stationed at 
Providence, Rhode Island. 

ROOT, GEORGE WELLS. 

(No. 28p. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Augusta, New York. 

Great-grandson of JESSE ROOT, of Coventry and 
Hartford, Connecticut (1737-1822), one of the gentle- 
men, who, in 1775, on their individual notes procured 
money from the treasury to provide for the expedition 
against Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Early in 1777 
he was Lieutenant-Colonel of a battalion of volunteers, 
then in service, raised at his request and by his efforts, 
and July 9th of the same year he was appointed by 
General Putnam ''Deputy Adjutant-General for this 
department" — the east side of the Hudson. He was 
chairman of the committee on prisoners of war, and 
useful in various other civil capacities during the 
Revolution. He represented Coventry in the General 
Assembly at one session in each of the years 1778-79- 
80, and he was a member of Congress in 1779-80-81-82. 



48.2 

He was appointed Judge of Superior Court in 1789, and 
Chief Judge in 1798, holding the office until his retire- 
ment in 1807 at the age of seventy. 

ROOT, JAMES LANKTON. 

(No. 5JJ. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; clerk; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL LANKTON, of Farm- 
ington, Connecticut (i 729-181 2), Ensign of the 3d com- 
pany in the 15th regiment, Connecticut militia, in 
1777, and later in the same year Lieutenant in the 
same company and regiment. In 1779 he commanded 
a company which turned out to repel the invasion 
under Tryon. 

ROOT, JOSEPH EDWARD. 

(No. 414. Admitted Dec. 22, i8qo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician and surgeon; born at Greenwich, 
Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH ROOT. ^See Root, 
Francis Pitkin^ 

ROOT, JUDSON HALL. 

(No. 242. Admitted Feb. 77, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JESSE ROOT. [See Roof, George 
Wells.] 

ROWLAND, HENRY LINCOLN. 

(No. 1121. Admitted Feb. 3, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIPHALET THORP 

(i 740-1 795), of Fairfield, Connecticut, who was ap- 
pointed by the General Assembly in November, 1776, a 
Captain in the ist battalion, under Colonel Whiting, 



483 

which served in Westchester county, and part of 
which went to Rhode Island in December, 1776. He 
also served at Peekskill under Lieutenant-Colonel 
Jonathan Dimon in October, 1777. 

ROWLAND, HERBERT SAMUEL. 

(No. 1 122. Admitted Feb. 3, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Weston, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIPHALET THORP. 
\^See Rowland, Henry Lincoln^ 

ROYCE, ALFRED LEE. 

(No. 3g4. Admitted Oct. 21, iSpo.) Chaplain m the 
United States Navy, U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, 
Maryland; born at Bristol, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ISAAC ATWATER (1758 ), of 

Meriden, Connecticut, a private soldier from Con- 
necticut, present at the battle of Long Island. 



(S/jX^C g;7^^^c/^^2!^ 



RUDD, WILLIAM BEARDSLEE. 

(No. loop. Admitted May 10, iSp^.) Of Lakeville, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Fredonia, New York. 

Great-gra^ndson of ROSWELL HAWKINS (1733- 
1828), of Amenia, New York, who was appointed, Octo- 
ber 17, 1775, Lieutenant-Colonel of the 6th regiment 
of Dutchess County, New York, militia, commanded 
by Colonel Sutherland. He was noticed for bravery 
at Fort Independence in 1777, and was present with 
his regiment at Saratoga in the same year. 

RUSSELL, CHARLES HOOKER. 

(No. 266. Admitted March 2p, i8po.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; provisions; born at New Haven, Connecti- 
cut. 



484 

Great -great-grandson of EDWARD RUSSELL, of 

Branford, Connecticut (1733 ), Captain of the 2d 

company in the 5th Connecticut battalion, commanded 
by Colonel William Douglas. This battalion was posted 
on the right of the line of works during the battle of 
Long Island, August 27, 1776, and was a part of the 
army which retreated to New York, August 29-30, It 
was at Kip's Bay, on the East river, at the time of the 
enemy's attack, September 15, and participated in the 
battle of White Plains, October 28, 1776. In 1777 he 
was an officer in the 2d regiment of Connecticut militia, 
of which he became Colonel in May, 1778. This regi- 
ment was in active service under General Spencer in 
Rhode Island. 

RUSSELL, GORDON. 

(No. S44- Admitted June 2p, i8gi.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at New Britain, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of EZEKIEL HUNTLEY (1752- 
1839), a member of the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Jedediah Huntington, the 8th Connecticut, 
1775, which was ordered to the Boston camps, and took 
post at Roxbury, in General Spencer's brigade. The 
following year he served in the loth Continental, 
commanded by Colonel Samuel Holden Parsons. This 
regiment was engaged in the battle of Long Island, 
and participated in the operations of the army on New 
York island and at White Plains. 



RYDER, HENRY CLAY. 

(No.'jSg. Admitted April 18, 1 8g 3.) Of Danbury, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Savings Bank of Danbury; 
born at South East, New York. 

Great-grandson of JOHN RYDER, of Tuckahoe, 
New York (1732-1812), who enlisted for three years in 



485 

1778 in the 4th company of the 2d New York regiment, 
commanded by Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt, and also 
rendered other services. 

SAGE, JOHN HALL. 

(No. 21'j. Admitted Feb. ly, i8qo.) Of Portland, Con- 
necticut; cashier of the First National Bank; born at 
Portland. 

Great-grandson of ZEBULON PENFIELD, of Chat- 
ham, Connecticut (1765-1860), who entered the army 
at the age of sixteen and served as coast guard. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILLIAM DIXON, 
of Chatham, Connecticut, a private soldier who served 
under Washington on Long Island, and in New York, 
1776. 

SANDS, FRANK ELBERT. 

(No. 1064. Admitted Dec. 16, i^pS-) Of Meriden, Connecti- 
cut; publisher; born at New Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JEREMIAH WAKEMAN 
(1756-1800), of New Fairfield, Connecticut, who was a 
member of the company of Captain Hickox, in the 3d 
Connecticut regiment of Light Horse, commanded by 
Major Starr, and served from August 20, 1780, to Jan- 
uary I, 1781. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson oi DAVID WAKE- 
MAN (1730 ), of New Fairfield, Connecticut, a 

private in the company of Captain Nehemiah Beards- 
ley, in the 5th Continental regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Waterbury, in service from May 9 to October 
8, 1775. The regiment served around New York, and 
in the northern department. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of JOHN HEN- 
DRICKS (1730-1797), of New Fairfield, Connecticut, a 
member of the company of Captain Nehemiah Beards- 
ley, in the 5th Continental regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Waterbury, from June to October, 1775, in ser- 
vice at New York and in the northern department. 



486 

SAVAGE, GEORGE EDWIN. 

(No. 768. Admitted Feb. 22, iSpj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; salesman; born at Berlin, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SETH SAVAGE (1755-1842), 
who is believed to have been a Corporal in 1777, in the 
regiment commanded by Colonel Henry Sherburne of 
Rhode Island. He was a pensioner. 

SAVAGE, HORACE SOUTHMAYD. 

(No. ^75. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of SETH SAVAGE. ^See Savage, 
George Edwin?[ 

SAWYER, CHARLES HILLIARD. 

(No. 801. Admitted April 18, i8pj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; attorney; born at Sangerfield, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSEPH FLOWER. {See 
Edgerton, Frank C] 

SCHENCK, MARTIN BRYANT. 

(No. y6p. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Fulton, New York. 

Great-grandson of JOHN SCHENCK, of New Jer- 
sey (i 740-1 794), a Captain in the 2d and 3d regiments 
of New Jersey, who served throughout the war. He 
was at Monmouth and in other battles. 

SCOTT, GEORGE AI. 

(No. 1142. Admitted April 21, i8pd.J Of Pequabuck, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at Plymouth, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-gresit-great-grsindson of JEJiEMIAH MAFK- 
HAM, 2d. \^See Markham, Ernest Arthur^ 

SCOTT, HENRY WALTER. 

(No. 1123. Admitted Feb. j, i8q6^ Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Manchester, Connecticut. 



487 

GTea.t-grea.t-gvandson o£ MOS£S SCOTT{i'j42-i^i7)y 
of Rowley, Massachusetts, who served for three days, 
from April 19, 1775, as a private in the company of 
Captain Edward Payson, which marched from Rowley 
in the Lexington alarm. He was also 2d Lieutenant 
in the company of Captain John Dodge, in the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Timothy Pickering, in 
service in December, 1776. 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of MOSES WAR- 
REN. \^See Chapman, Dwight.'] 

SCOTT, MERRITT BRADFORD. 

(JVo. loio. Admitted May 10, iSg^.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; cashier insurance company; born at East 
Windsor, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of MOSES SCOTT. \^See Scott, Henry 
Walter?^ 

SEELEY, WILLIAM ELMER. 

(No. pj6. Admitted May 10, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SETH SEELEY (1739-1817), of 
Fairfield, Connecticut, who was an Ensign in the com- 
pany of Captain Abijah Sterling, under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Dimon, on a short tour of duty on the Hudson 
River at Peekskill in October, 1777. 

SEGUR, GIDEON CROSS. 

(No. 102^. Admitted June ly, iSqs.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH BENNETT (1745- 
1836), of Tiverton, Rhode Island, who enlisted at 
Tiverton May 2, 1775, and served for ten months in 
the company commanded by Captain William Cook, in 
the regiment commanded by Colonel Thomas Church. 
He was a pensioner. 



488 

SELDEN, HENRY MARTIN. 

(No. 2g4. Admitted March 2p^ iSgo.) Of Haddam Neck, 
Connecticut; postmaster; born at Haddam Neck. 

Grandson of ELIAS SELDEN, of Haddam, Con- 
necticut (1758 ), a private soldier serving with 

the Connecticut troops at White Plains, New York, 
where he was discharged for disability. He was 
afterwards Captain of militia. 

SEYMOUR, DUDLEY STUART. 

(No. 616. Admitted Jan. 18, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; contractor; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of Lieutenant EBENEZER 
POND. \See Boyd, Edward EbenezerJ] 

SEYMOUR, GEORGE DUDLEY. 

(No. 285. Admitted March 2q, i8po.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at Bristol, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NOAH SEYMOUR, who entered 
the Revolutionary army in 1778, and served as an Or- 
derly-Sergeant in Captain Amasa Mills' company. Col- 
onel Enos' regiment, on the Hudson, for nine months. 
He afterwards enlisted in Captain Elijah Seymour's 
company of Dragoons. 

Also, great-great-grandson of CHARLES 
CHURCHLLL, a Lieutenant in Captain Welles' com- 
pany, in the Connecticut regiment commanded by 
Colonel Wolcott, 1776, etc. In 1777 he was Captain in 
the 6th regiment of Connecticut militia. 

Also, great-great-grandson of EPHRALM PAT- 
TERSON, Ensign and subsequently Lieutenant in Col- 
onel David Hobart's regiment, Stark's brigade, which 
was engaged in the battle of Bennington, August, 
1777. In the following year he was a Lieutenant in 
Captain Ezekiel Ladd's company, in Colonel Timothy 
Bedel's New Hampshire regiment. He was in service 
at that time for one year. 



489 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN PATTER- 
SON^ of Piermont, New Hampshire, agent for the 
purchase of powder from the colony of Connecticut 
for the defense of the town. 

SEYMOUR, HORACE SPENCER. 

(No. 617. Admitted January 18^ i8g2.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of Lieutenant EBENEZER 
POND. \^See Boyd, Edward Ebenezer.'] 

SEYMOUR, (MRS.) LAURA HOLLISTER POND. 
(No. 722. Admitted Sept. ij, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Columbia, South Carolina. 

Great-granddaughter of EBENEZER POND. ^See 
Boyd, Edward Ebenezer.^ 

SEYMOUR, (MRS.) SUSAN HAYES SMITH. 

(No. 723. Admitted May 16, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-granddaughter of EBENEZER POND. 
\^See Boyd, Edward Ebenezer^ 

SHEFFIELD, THOMAS DENISON. 

(No. gi6. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Westerly, 
Rhode Island; insurance agent; born at Stonington, 
Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of GILES RUSSELL, of 
Rocky Hill, Connecticut (i 7 29-1 7 79), who was appointed 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the 3d battalion, (Colonel Sage), 
Wadsworth's brigade, 1776; time of service expired 
December 25, 1776; again appointed Lieutenant-Colonel 
of the 4th regiment, Connecticut line, formation of 
1777-1781. He was promoted March 5, 1778, to be 
Colonel of the 8th regiment, Connecticut line, and died 
while engaged in the service at Danbury, Connecti- 
cut, October 28, 1779; he participated in the battles 
of White Plains and Germantown. 



490 

SHELDON, CHARLES ANSON. 

(No. gi'j. Admitted April ly, i8g4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; cashier of Second National Bank; born 
at Portland, Maine. 

Great-grandson of PAUL DUDLEY SARGENT, 
of Salem, Massachusetts (i 745-1827), an organizer of 
Minute-men in 1772; Colonel of i6th Massachusetts 
regiment, 1775, ^.nd a participant in the battle of Bun- 
ker Hill, Long Island, Harlem Heights, White Plains, 
and Trenton. 

SHELTON, CHARLES EGERTON. 

(No. loii. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-grandson of WLLLIAM THOMPSON, 
of Stratford, Connecticut (1742-1777), killed at Ridge- 
field, Connecticut, in 1777, during the Danbury raid. 

SHELTON, WILLIAM ROUMAGE. 

(No. gi8. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; clerk of the Superior Court; born at 
Bridgeport. 

Great-great-grandson of Lieutenant W I LLL A M 
THOMPSON. {^See Shelton, Charles Egerton.] 

*SHEPARD, CARROLL SYLVANUS. 

(No. 8s. Admitted May, i88g.) Of West Haven, Con- 
necticut; born at West Haven. Died October 30, 1893. 

Great-grandson of BLINN TYLER. 
Also, great-great-grandson of ABRAHAM TYLER. 
Also, great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY SHEP- 
ARD. l^See Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. jdp, 424.'] 

SHEPARD, JAMES. 

(No. 4SS- Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New Britain, Con- 
necticut; solicitor of patents; born at Southington, 
Connecticut. 



491 

Grandson of SAMUEL ALCOX (17 1819), a pri- 
vate in Captain Beecher's company of the 15th regi- 
ment of Connecticut militia. 

Also, grandson of SAMUEL SHEPARD (1754-1803), 
of Southington, Connecticut, who served for three 
months in the summer of 1778, in the company of 
Captain Asa Bray, in the regiment commanded by 
Colonel Roger Enos. 

SHIPMAN, ARTHUR LEFFINGWELL. 

(No. 4Sp. Admitted Feb. 18, 1891.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of HENRY CHAMPION, Jr. 
ySee Huntington, Robert Watkinson.^ 

Also, great -great -great -grandson of HENRY 
CHAMPION, Sr. [See Gilbert, Charles Ed%vin?[ 

SHIPMAN, NATHANIEL. 

(No. 222. Admitted Feb. ly, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; Judge of the United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals; born at Norwich, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of HENRY CHAMPION, Sr. 
[See Gilbert, Charles Edwin.'\ 

Also, great-grandson of HENRY CHAMPION, Jr. 
[See Huntington, Robert Watkinson.^ 

SILL, EDWARD EVERETT. 

(No. 1143. Admitted April 21, i8p6.] Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; insurance; born at Livonia, New York. 

Great-grandson of ANDREW SILL, Jr. (1745-1835), 
of Lyme, Connecticut, who enlisted in 1776 and served 
four months as Ensign in the company of Captain 
Thompson, under Colonel Wolcott. He again enlisted 
in June, 1778, and served two years as artificer in the 
company of Captain Post, under Colonel Knox. He 
was a pensioner. 



492 

*SILL, GEORGE ELIOT. 

(No. 234. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; attorney-at-law; born at Hartford. Died 
March 9, 1896. 

Great-grandson of ELIAKIM MARSHALL. 
Also, great-great-grandson of EARL CLAPP. S^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, p. j'/o, and obituary, Year Book, iSp^-d.] 

SILLIMAN, LEWIS BURR. 

(JVo. 1012. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Sullivan, New York. 

Grandson of JAMES PENFIELD (1758-1840), of 
Fairfield, Connecticut, who was a member of the com- 
pany of Captain Bartram in the regiment commanded 
by Colonel Samuel Whiting, detached to join Silli- 
man's brigade, and served in October, 1777, in a short 
campaign at Ridgefield and Horse Neck. He was a 
pensioner. 

SIMMONS, ABEL HENRY. 

(No. P84. Admitted Feb. 11, i8ps.) Of Mystic, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Ashford, Connecticut. 

Grandson of JOSEPH BURN HAM. \^See Glazier, 
Charles Mather^ 

SKIFF, FREDERICK WOODWARD. 

(No. 1063. Admitted Dec. 16, i8g^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; clerk Insurance Commissioner's office; 
born at Kent, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of iV^r^^A^6'X/i^7^, 2^ (175 1-1833), 
of Kent, Connecticut, who was a member of the com- 
pany of Captain Abraham Fuller, of Kent, in the 13th 
regiment, Connecticut militia, commanded by Colonel 
Benjamin Hinman, in service at New York in 1776, 
and in the Danbury raid. 



493 

SKINNER, WILLIAM CONVERSE. 

(No. 248. Admitted Feb. 77, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; wool merchant; born at Malone, New York. 

Great-grandson of CALVIN SKINNER^ a Corporal 
in Lieutenant Paine Converse's company in the nth 
regiment of Connecticut militia, at New York in 1776. 

SLADE, LUCIUS MYRON 

(No. 131. Admitted Dec. 12, i88p.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Hartland, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ABNER SLADE, a private soldier in 
Captain Simon's company, in Colonel Wolcott's regi- 
ment, in 1776. 

Also, great-grandson of JAMES SLADE, Corporal 
in Captain Simon's company, in Colonel Wolcott's 
regiment in 1776. 

SLATE, DWIGHT. 
(No. g2. Admitted May 22, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer of machinery; born at Gill, 
Massachusetts. 

Grandson of PHILIP BALLARD, a Sergeant from 
Montague, Massachusetts, in Captain Grover's com- 
pany of Colonel Williams' regiment. 

SLOPER, ANDREW JACKSON. 

(No. ^85. Admitted Feb. 11, i8ps.J Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; bank cashier; born at Southington, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DANLEL SLOPER (1727-1789), 
of Southington, Connecticut, who served in Major 
Sheldon's regiment of Light Horse, October 26 to 
December 24, 1776, accompanying the Continental 
army on its retreat through New Jersey, and also 
turned out in the Danbury alarm. 

33 



494 

SLOSSON, FRANK SPOONER. 

(No. 1 124. Admitted March 2j, i8g6,) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; manager mercantile agency; born at 
Kent, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of THADDEUS CRANE 
(i 728-1803), of North Salem, New York, who was ap- 
pointed Captain of the North Salem company in the 
2d regiment of Westchester county, September 13, 
1775, and on October 19 the same 3^ear was commis- 
sioned 2d Major of the same regiment. He served in 
the engagement at Danbury, Connecticut, April 27, 
1777, and was wounded. In October, 1779, he was com- 
missioned Lieutenant-Colonel of the 4th Westchester 
County regiment. 

SMITH, AARON. 

(No. 6yi. Adfnitted April ig, 18^2.) Of Warehouse 
Point, Connecticut; merchant; born at East Windsor, 
Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH LORD. \^See Filer, 
Anson Priest?^ 

Also, great-grandson of JEREMIAH LORD. S^See 
Filer, Anson Priest^ 

SMITH, EDWARD SPENCER. 

(No. 112^. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of WARD PECK. \^See Peck, Joel 
Ward Simmons. ^^ 

SMITH, FRANK CLIFTON. 

(No. S06. Admitted May 28, i8gi.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at Middletown. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH BACON, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut (1761-1791). He enlisted April 14, 
1777, in the company of Captain Charles Whiting, in 
the Continental regiment commanded by Colonel Sam- 



495 

uel B. Webb. In 1778 the regiment was ordered to 
Rhode Island, and there participated in the battle of 
Quaker Hill. 

SMITH, GEORGE BRAINARD. 

(No. gig. Admitted April 77, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; accountant; born at Dayton, Ohio. 

Great-grandson of MATTHEW SMITH, of East 
Haddam, Connecticut (i 740-1824), who served as a 
private soldier in Captain John Willey's company, 
from East Haddam, in the Lexington alarm, April, 

1775. 

SMITH, JAMES ALLWOOD. 

(No. g86. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Glastonbury, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson oi JOSEPH MORGAN (1736 ), 

of West Springfield, Massachusetts, who was Captain 
of a company in the 3d regiment of Massachusetts 
militia, commanded by Colonel John Mosely, which 
marched from West Springfield to join the northern 
army in 1776. 

SMITH, (MRS.) JANE TREAT HILLS. 

(No. 2^1. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; wife of Charles H. Smith; born at Hart- 
ford. 

Great-granddaughter of JONAS COOLIDGE. \_See 
Hills., Jonas Coolidge.^ 

SMITH, JEROME COLLINS. 

(No. ^87. Admitted Feb. 22, i8gS-) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Middletown. 

Great-great-grandson of JOSEPH HILLARD (1737- 
1820), of Killingworth, Connecticut, who served as 
Sergeant in the company commanded by Captain 



49^ 

Samuel Gale of Killingworth, which marched in the 
Lexington alarm. He was also, on July 6, 1775, com- 
missioned Ensign in the 3d company, under Captain 
Jonathan Latimer, in the 7th regiment, commanded 
by Colonel Charles Webb, was promoted to Lieutenant 
September i, and served till December 10, 1775, the 
service consisting of guarding various points along 
the Sound until September 14, when the regiment was 
ordered to the Boston camps. In July, 1776, he was 
appointed Ensign of the ist company, Captain Aaron 
Stevens, of Colonel Mott's battalion, which was raised 
to reinforce the Continental troops in the northern 
department, where they served under General Gates 
until November, 1776. 



SMITH, JOSEPH RICHARD. 

(No. 1126. Admitted Feb. 23, i8g6.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of WARD PECK. ^See Peck, Joel 
Ward Simmons.^ 

SMITH, KNIGHTON. 
(No. 1026. Admitted June ly, iSpS-) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; tailor; born at Brooklyn, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of DAVID STRONG (1758- 
1838), of Northampton, Massachusetts, who served as a 
private on different occasions during 1777 in the com- 
pany of Captain Oliver Lyman in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Ezra May when he marched to 
East Hoosac on alarm, and was in the expedition to 
Stillwater and Saratoga. He also appears as Corporal 
on the pay-roll of Captain Ebenezer Strong's company 
in the 2d Hampshire County regiment, for service in 
Northampton, June 15-17, 1782, by order of Elisha 
Porter, Sheriff. He also served at other times and in 
other companies. 



497 

SMITH, RALPH HERBERT. 

(No. g20. Admitted April ly, 18^4.) Of Waterbury, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of WARD PECK. \^See Peck, Joel 
Ward Simmons?^ 

SMITH, (MRS.) SARAH JEANNETTE BOYD. 

(No. ^24. Admitted May 16, 18^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at New Haven. 

Great-granddaughter of EBENEZER POND. ^See 
Boyd, Edward Ebenezer^ 

SNOW, CHARLES PAUL. 

(No. 1066. Admitted Oct. i^, iSg^-) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of SOLOMON PINTO, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, who served as Ensign from 
October 17, 1780, until June, 1783, in the company of 
Captain Caleb Baldwin, in the 7th regiment, Connecti- 
cut line, commanded by Colonel Heman Swift. He 
was a pensioner, and a member of the Society of the 
Cincinnati. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ABRAHAM PINTO, 
of New Haven, Connecticut, who served in the company 
of Captain Eli Leavenworth, and was wounded at the 
British invasion of New Haven, July 5, 1779. 

*SPENCER, ALFRED LAWRENCE. 

(No. 725. Admitted Sept. 13, 18^2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; born at New Haven. Died July 5, 1895. 

Great-grandson of ELIHU SPENCER. 

Also, great-great-grandson of the Reverend Doctor 
NAPHTALI DAGGETT. ^See Year Book, 1893-4, p. 
3'j2, and obituary, Year Book, i8ps-^-] 



498 

SPENCER, ELMER ELLSWORTH. 

(No. 8'j6, Admitted May lo, 18^3,) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; assistant postmaster; born at Westbrook, 
Connecticut, 

Great-grandson of JOEL DOANE, of Saybrook, 
Connecticut (1763-185 2), a private soldier from Con- 
necticut in the war of the Revolution. 

SPENCER, ERNEST ELWOOD. 

(No. 877. Admitted May 10, 18^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; postoffice money-order clerk; born at West- 
brook, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOEL DOANE. \^See Spencer, 
Elmer Ellsworth^ 

SPENCER, FRANCIS ELIHU. 

(No. 726. Admitted Jan. 6, i8p3.J Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Waterbury, Connecticut. 

Grandson of ELIHU SPENCER, of Waterbury, 
Connecticut (1762-1840). In July, 1781, a member of 
Captain Nathaniel Edwards' company in General 
David Waterbury's state brigade. This brigade 
joined Washington in July, 1781, while he was en- 
camped at Phillipsburg, and for some time after was 
under General Heath's orders on the Westchester line. 

SPENCER, FREDERICK ALBERT. 

(No. 14. Admitted April 2, i88p.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; real estate; born at Waterbury. 

Grandson of ANSEL SPENCER (17 1850), a pri- 
vate soldier in a Connecticut regiment. He was a 
pensioner. 

SPENCER, GEORGE FRANCIS. 

(No. 81. Admitted April 23, i88p.) Of Deep River, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at Hampton, Connecti- 
cut. 



499 

Great-grandson of JAMES SPALDING, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. 

Also, g-reat-grandson of JEDUTHAN SPENCER, 
a private soldier in Captain John Kingsley's company 
in the Lexington alarm. 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH BADCOCK, Jr., 
a private soldier in Captain Warner's company in the 
Lexington alarm. 

SPERRY, MARK LEAVENWORTH. 

(No. dsp. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Waterbnry, 
Connecticut; secretary of the Scovill Manufactiiring 
Company; born at Waterbury. 

Great-grandson of JESSE LEAVENWORTH (1741- 
1824), a Lieutenant in the Governor's Foot Guards of 
New Haven, which turned out in the Lexington alarm. 
In 1777 he was in service as Captain at Fort Ticonder- 
oga. 

SPERRY, NEHEMIAH DAVID. 

(No. g88. Admitted October 16, 18^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; member of Congress; born at Wood- 
bridge, Connecticut. 

Grandson of SIMEON SPERRY (1738-1825), of 
Woodbridge, Connecticut, who turned out on the 
occasion of the British invasion of New Haven in July, 
1779, and served with the companies of Captain Hill- 
house and Captain Daggett. 

SQUIRES, ELISHA BANCROFT. 

(N0.J28. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; provisions; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL BANCROFT {1737- 
, who marched from the town of East Windsor for 



the relief of Boston in the Lexington alarm, April, 
1775. In the same year he was commissioned Lieuten- 
ant in the 5th company, of the 8th Connecticut regi- 



Soo 

ment, commanded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington, 
and remained in service until the expiration of the 
term of the regiment, in December, 1775. He also 
served in the early part of the following year as a 
Lieutenant in the Connecticut regiment commanded 
by Colonel Erastus Wolcott, which formed a part of 
the army before Boston when the town was evacuated 
by the British forces. 

STAGG, HENRY PRICE. 
(No. 137. Admitted Dec. 12, iSSg.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; town clerk; born at Stratford. 

Great-grandson of JO SI AH PECK, a private soldier 
in the Revolutionary war. 

Also, great-grandson of AGUR CURTIS (1757- 
1838), of Stratford, Connecticut, who enlisted in April, 

1776, and served one month as private in the company 
commanded by Captain George Benjamin. At some 
period later in 1776 he again enlisted, and served for 
seven weeks as private in the company of Captain 
Wheeler, under Colonel Samuel Whiting. In April, 

1777, he served for one week as private in the same 
company. In November, 1777, he served for two 
weeks as private in the company of Captain Stiles 
Judson, under Colonel Whiting, and in January, 1779, 
he served for nine weeks under Captain Judson in the 
same regiment. He was a pensioner. 

STANLEY, ALIX W. 

(No. 1067. Admitted Dec. 16, iSg^.) Of New York city; 
mechanical engineer; born at Brooklyn, New York. 

Great-great-grandson of GAD STANLEY (1735- 
1815), of New Britain, Connecticut, who was a Captain 
of militia at the outbreak of the war, and was ap- 
pointed a member of the committee of the town of 
Farmington to raise subscriptions for the people of 
Boston on that port being closed. He commanded 



50I 

the ist company of the 2nd battalion of Wadsworth's 
brigade, under Colonel Gay, at the battle of Long 
Island, and in October, 1776, was appointed Major of 
the 15th regiment, Connecticut militia, serving under 
Colonel Hooker at Peekskill. In May, 1779, he was 
appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the same regiment. 
He was a member of the General Assembly from 
Farmington from 1778 to 1782, and from Berlin from 
1785 to 1804. 

♦STANLEY, WILLIAM MARTIN. 

(No. 213. Admitted Feb. 17, i8go.) Of East Hartford, 
Connecticut; born at East Hartford. Died May 2, 
1892. 

Grandson of THEODORE STANLEY. S^See Year 
Book, i8p2,pp. 226, 26^.] 

STANTON, JOHN OILMAN. 
(No. j68. Admitted Sept. 10, 18^0.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; physician and surgeon; born at New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

Great-grandson of JOHN STANTON, of Berwick, 

Maine, and Dover, New Hampshire, (1757 ), who 

was in the action at Bunker Hill. He was always 
called Captain Stanton when spoken of in the family. 

STARR, CHARLES FELLOWS. 

(No. p2i. Admitted April I y, 1 8p4.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; insurance agent; born at Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM STARR, of Groton, 
Connecticut (1745-1816), a Lieutenant under Colonel 
Ledyard at Fort Griswold, and was severely wounded 
by a musket ball at the time of the massacre. 

STARR, FRANK FARNSWORTH. 

(No. ly. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; genealogist; born at Middletown. 



5^2. 

Great-grandson of NATHAN STARR, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut (1755-1821), a private in the com- 
pany of Captain Joseph Churchill, in the regiment of 
Colonel Comfort Sage; appointed Armorer of said 
regiment, June 20, 1776. He served on Long Island 
and in New York city. 

Also, great-grandson of GEORGE BUSH, of Port- 
land, Connecticut (1756-1843), a drummer in the com- 
pany of Captain Abraham Tyler, in the 8th Connecti- 
cut regiment, 1775, who served at Lebanon, Stoning- 
ton, and New London, Connecticut, and at Roxbury, 
Massachusetts. He was also drummer in the company 
of Captain Joseph Churchill, in Colonel Comfort Sa,ge's 
regiment, 1776; was in New York city when that city 
was occupied by the British, and was in the battles of 
Harlem Heights and White Plains; he also served 
elsewhere. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSEPH CHURCH- 
ILL. [See Bulkley^Erastus Brainerd.'] 

STARR, JONATHAN. 

(No. ii2y. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Terry ville, 
Connecticut; bookkeeper; born at Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of AMOS RANSOM. [See Gilder- 
sleeve, Alfred.'] 

STARR, WILLIAM EDWARD. 

(No. 618. Admitted Jan. 18, i8p2.) Of New Milford, 
Connecticut; merchant; born at New Milford. 

Great-great-grandson of JO SI AH STARR (1740- 
1813), of New Milford, Connecticut, who, on the first 
call for troops, April-May, 1775, was commissioned 
Captain in the 4th Connecticut, Colonel Benjamin 
Hinman. This regiment reached Ticonderoga in 
June, and took part in the operations in the northern 
department until the expiration of its term of service. 



S03 

December, 1775. Captain Starr participated in the 
capture of St. Johns. In 1776 he was Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Heman Swift, which also served in the northern 
department. He continued in service in 1777, as 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the 7th regiment, Connecticut 
line, formation of 1777 to 1781, and was promoted to 
be Colonel of the ist regiment, Connecticut line, in 
May of that year. This regiment was engaged on the 
left flank at the battle of Germantown, wintered at 
Valley Forge, was present at the battle of Monmouth, 
and served on the east side of the Hudson and in 
repelling Tryon's invasion. He was a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. 

STEARNS, HENRY PUTNAM. 

(No. 300, Admitted March 2g^ 1 8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Sutton, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of INCREASE STEARNS, Jr., of Holden, 
Massachusetts, a soldier during the war of the Revo- 
lution, in a Massachusetts regiment commanded by 
Colonel Timothy Bigelow. According to his own 
statement, he " preferred hard and perilous duty, 
often exposed my life in the service of my country in 
many skirmishes and battles with the enemy." 

*STEDMAN, JOHN WOODHULL. 

(No. g6. Admitted Sept. 7, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the State Savings Bank; 'born 
at Enfield, Connecticut. Died February 10, 1896. 

Grandson of JAMES STEBBINS. ^See Year Book, 
i8pj-4, p. jy6, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 

STEELE, EDWARD DANIEL. 

(No. 878. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Lima, New York. 



S04 

Great-grandson of LUKE STEELE, of Farming- 
ton, Connecticut (1739-1789), a member of a company 
of Bethlehem volunteers, July, 1776. 

STEELE, THOMAS SEDGWICK. 

(No. pSp. Adjnitted Oct. 16, 1894.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; artist; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of TIMOTHY SEBGWLCK (1^62,- 
^^2>2>), of Hartford, Connecticut, who served for two 
months in the summer of 1779 in the company of Cap- 
tain Abraham Sedgwick. He again enlisted July i, 
1780, and served until Dec. 14, 1780, in the company of 
Captain Peleg Heath, in the 3d regiment, Connecticut 
line, commanded by Colonel Samuel Wyllys. He was 
a pensioner. 

STEINER, BERNARD CHRISTIAN. 

(No. ^88. Admitted Oct. 14, i8gi.) Of Baltimore, Mary- 
land; teacher; born at Guilford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of EBENEZER HEBERT, 
of Connecticut and Wyoming (1743-1802), Lieutenant 
of a company of rangers organized at the time of the 
Lexington alarm. He participated in the battle of 
Bunker Hill. The following year he removed to Wy- 
oming, and was among the defenders of Wyoming 
who escaped when the settlement was attacked by the 
enemy in 1778. In 1779 he served under Sullivan in 
his campaign against the Indians. 

Also, great-great-grandson of RICHARD SMITH, 
of Brookfield, Connecticut (1736-1819), Captain of the 
loth company, in the i6th regiment of Connecticut 
militia, commanded by Joseph Piatt Cooke, in active 
service at New York in 1776. He was also in active 
service in 1779, at the time of Tryon's invasion. 

Also, great-great-grandson of TIMOTHY SEW- 
ARD, of Guilford, Connecticut (1756-1849), a musician 
in the Revolutionary war. 



S05 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of SAMUEL LEE, 
of Guilford, Connecticut (1742-1819), Lieutenant com- 
manding a company stationed as guard for that town 
in 1780. He received a Captain's commission in 1783. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN STELNER, of 
Frederick county, Maryland, a member of the com- 
mittee of observation for the Middle District of Fred- 
erick county in 1775-76, and Captain in the militia. 

STETSON, JAMES EBENEZER. 

(No. 727. Admitted Sept. 13, i8g2.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; physician; born at Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Great-grandson of ROBERT SHARP, of Pomfret, 
Connecticut, Ensign of the 8th company in the nth 
regiment of Connecticut militia, which marched to 
Westchester in the fall of 1776. 

STEVENS, FREDERICK HOLLISTER. 

(No, Syg. Admitted Oct. //, iSgs.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; secretary and treasurer of The Standard 
Association; born at Meriden, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of DA VLB POST, of Hebron, Con- 
necticut (1752-1840), who marched from Hebron in 
Captain Worthy Waters' company in the Lexington 
alarm, 1775. 

STEVENS, FREDERICK SYLVESTER. 

(No. ygo. Admitted April 18, i8gj.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at Danbury, Connecticut. 
Great-grandson of EZRA STEVENS. [See Hamil- 
ton, Paul L>am'd.~\ 

STEVENS, JAMES REYNOLDS. 

(No. 436. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Orange, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JAMES REYNOLDS. [See Foote, 
Ellsworth Irving.^ 



5o6 

STEVENS, (MRS.) JENNIE MAY DASKAM. 

(No. 5pp. Admitted Dec. 14, i8gi.) Wife of James L. 
Stevens, of Norwalk, Connecticut; born at Norwalk. 

Great-granddaughter of PETER ROGERS (1754- 
1849), of New London, Connecticut, a Revolutionary 
soldier, who was with the army at Valley Forge, and 
participated in the battle of Monmouth. 

STEVENSON, HENRY COGSWELL. 

(No. ppo. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; journalist; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-great-grandson of WILLIAM THOMP- 
SON. \^See Shelton, Charles Egerton.l 

STILLMAN, HENRY ALLYN. 

(No. 231. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Wethersfield, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN FRANCIS. [See Board- 
man, Thomas Jefferson^ 

STIVERS, JAMES HOWLAND. 

(No. 882. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Stonington. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL STIVERS, who enlisted 
July, 1779, at Oxford, Sussex county. New Jersey, and 
served six months in the New Jersey state troops, in 
Captain George Ribble's company. He also served 
other short terms, amounting in all ,to about three 
months' actual service. 

ST. JOHN, GEORGE BUCKINGHAM. 

(No. 638. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Norwalk Fire Insurance 
Company; born at Norwalk. 

Great-grandson of ELIPHALET LOCKWOOD. [See 
Lockwood, Frederick St. John.'] 



507- 

ST. JOHN, HOWELL WILLIAMS. 

(No. 330. Admitted May 10, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; actuary of the ^tna Life Insurance Com- 
pany; born at Newport, Rhode Island. 

Grandson of ENOCH ST. JOHN, of New Canaan, 
Connecticut (1765 ). He entered the military ser- 
vice when about sixteen years old, and was on sentry 
duty at the time of the burning of Fairfield, and later 
a participant in a successful attack on an armed ves- 
sel in the waters of Long Island Sound. 

STONE, CHARLES GREENE. 
(No. ppi. Admitted Dec. 10, i8g4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; audit clerk Travelers' Insurance Company; 
born at Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JOB MATTISON (17— 
-1809), of Coventry, Rhode Island, who enlisted in May, 

1775, and served for eight months as a private in the 
company of Captain Edward Johnson, in the Rhode 
Island regiment commanded by Colonel Varnum. He 
again enlisted in January, 1776, and served for twelve 
months as private, in the company of Captain Haw- 
kins, in the regiment commanded by Colonel Varnum. 
He was at the siege of Boston, and at the capture of 
Fort Washington, November 16, 1776, he was made a 
prisoner, and paroled after a few months. His widow 
received a pension. 

STORRS, GEORGE LYON. 

(No. I02Y. Admitted June ly, iSg^.) Of Willimantic, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper; born at Coventry, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC ARNOLD (1764-1841), of 
Mansfield, Connecticut, who enlisted in September, 

1776, and served for three months as drummer in the 
company of Captain Lemuel Clark, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel Experience Storrs; he again 
enlisted in July, 1778, and served for two months as 



5o8 

drummer in the company of Captain John Arnold. 
He again enlisted in October, 1778, and served for one 
month as drummer in the company of Captain Eleazer 
Huntington. He again enlisted in July, 1779, and 
served for eight months as drummer in the company 
of Captain James Dana, in the regiment commanded 
by Colonel Wells. He again enlisted in March, 1781, 
and served for twelve months as drummer in the com- 
pany of Captain James Dana, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Waterbury. He was a pensioner. 

STORRS, SAMUEL PORTER. 

(No. 1028. Admitted June 17, iSg^.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at Coventry, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ISAAC ARNOLD, \^See Storrs, 
George Lyon.^ 

STRICKLAND, GEORGE ELIHU. 

(No. 728. Admitted Sept. 13, i8p2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Portland, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL KILBOURN, of Chat- 
ham, Connecticut (i 750-1834.) He turned out from the 
town of Chatham in the Lexington alarm. He was 
subsequently a Lieutenant in the militia. 

^STRONG, HORACE HUBBARD. 

(No. 77. Admitted April 22, i88g.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; wholesale provisions; born at Durham, 
Connecticut. Died July 27, 1893. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS STRONG. \^See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. 381, 422.'] 

SUGDEN, WILLIAM EDWARD. 

(No. 1128. Admitted Feb. j, i8p6.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Middletown, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL WALES (1719- 
1790), of Braintree, Massachusetts, who was a member 



S09 

of the company of Captain Silas Wild, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel 'Benjamin Lincoln, which 
assembled April 19, 1775, and served nine days in the 
Lexington alarm. He also served in the independent 
company of Braintree from January i, to May 27, 1776, 
tinder Captain Ebenezer Thayer. He also served as a 
Corporal, from March 25, to April 7, 1778, in the com- 
pany of Captain Eliphalet Sawen, under Colonel Wil- 
liam Mackintosh at Roxbury. 

Also, grandson of NATHANIEL WALES, Jr, (1757- 
1825), of Braintree, Massachusetts, who served for 
three days as a private in the comaany of Captain 
John Vinton, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Benjamin Lincoln, which marched from Braintree, 
April 19, 1775, in the Lexington alarm. He also 
enlisted May 3, 1775, and served for eight months and 
eighteen days in the same company. He also served 
for two days from June 13, 1776, in the company of 
Captain Moses French, in the regiment commanded 
by Colonel Jonathan Bass, assembled at Braintree 
upon orders to march to Hough's Neck, and again 
June 24, 1776, upon orders to Nantucket. 

SUTLIFFE, BENNETT HURD. 

(No. 1 1 44. Admitted April 21, 18^6.) Of Plymouth, 
Connecticut; farmer; born at Plymouth. 

Great-grandson of JOHN SUTLIFFE, 3d (1743- 
1816), of Plymouth, Connecticut, who enlisted July 4, 
1776, in the company of Minutemen of Captain Jotham 
Curtis from Northbury, in the town of Waterbury. 
This company turned out to repel the invasion at New 
Haven, July 5, 1779. He was also a private in the 
company of Captain Samuel Camp, in the militia 
regiment commanded by Colonel Noadiah Hooker, 
which marched to Peekskill April 29, 1777, where the 
regiment continued for one month and twenty-two 
days, under General Erastus Wolcott. 

34 



SWAIN, JOHN DEWALL. 

(No. g22. Admitted March 5, 18^4.) Of Worcester, 
Massachusetts; private secretary; born at Norfolk, 
Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of ASAHEL HUMPHREY. 

YSee Dew ell, James Dudley^ 

SWARTWOUT, JOHN HENRY. 

(No. 58. Admitted April 24, i88g.) Of Stamford, Con- 
necticut; secretary; born at Stamford. 

Great-grandson of ABRAM SWARTWOUT, a Cap- 
tain in the 3d battalion, raised by the State of New 
York, 1776, commanded by Colonel Peter Gansevoort. 
He was among the stout-hearted defenders of Fort 
vSchuyler when it was besieged by St. Leger in August, 
1777, and the blue field of the flag, after the pattern 
prescribed by Congress a few weeks before, raised 
over one of the bastions, was made from his overcoat. 

Also, great-grandson of SAMUEL SATTERLEE, 
of Stonington, Connecticut, a Captain of Minutemen. 

SWIFT, EDWARD STRONG. 

(No. ii2g. Admitted Feb. j, i8g6.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-great-grandson of CALEB HOTCH- 
XLSS (1711-1779), of New Haven, Connecticut, who 
served as Captain of a company under General 
Spencer in Rhode Island in 1776-77-78, and who was 
killed at New Haven while resisting the invasion 
of Tryon, July 5, 1779. 

SWIFT, TALLMADGE. 

(No. 54. Admitted April 2j, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Warren, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of HEM AN SWLFT. [See Funder- 
son, Samuel Fuller^ 



SWORDS, JOSEPH FORSYTH. 

(No. i02g. Admitted July 5, i8qs^ Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of FRANCIS DAWSON SWORDS 
(173T-1800), of New Fairfield, Connecticut, who en- 
listed at Stamford, July 6, 1775, in the company of 
Captain Joseph Hoyt, in the 7th regiment, commanded 
by Colonel Charles Webb, raised in response to the 
call of the General Assembly at its July session. This 
company served at New York city and at several 
points along Long Island Sound until September i, 
1775, when, on requisition made by General Washing- 
ton, the regiment was sent to Winter Hill, near 
Boston, was assigned to General Sullivan's brigade, 
and remained there until mustered out by expiration 
of the term of service, December 10, 1775. 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM BATTERSON 
(i 743-1815), of Fairfield, Connecticut, who enlisted at 
Fairfield, May 6, 1775, as private in the 7th company, 
Captain Ichabod Doolittle, of the 5th regiment. Col- 
onel David Waterbury, and served until December 13, 
1775. He was also a private in the company of Cap- 
tain Joseph Allen Wright, in the 2d Connecticut regi- 
ment, under Colonel Heman Swift, from January 12, 
until December 31, 1781. The tradition of the family 
is that he was in continual service under different 
assignments and consolidation of regiments for six 
years. His father, George Batterson, also served in 
the same companies with him in 1775 and 1781. 

TAINTOR, JAMES ULYSSES. 

(No. 187. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; secretary of the Orient Insurance Company; 
born at Pomfret, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of RALPH SMITH, a member of 
the company of Minute-men that turned out from 
Chatham in the Lexington alarm; in 1776, a private 



soldier in Captain Jonathan Johnson's company, of 
Colonel Bradley's regiment. This regiment was 
stationed the greater part of the summer and fall of 
1776 in New Jersey. In October it moved up the river, 
and in November most of the regiment was sent 
across to assist in defending Fort Washington. 

TALCOTT, CHARLES HOOKER. 

(No. s8g. Admitted Oct. 14, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of THOMAS HART 
HOOKER^ of Farmington, Connecticut (1745-1775), a 
member of the 2d company of the 2d Connecticut 
regiment, commanded by General Spencer, in 1775. 
Detachments of officers and men of this regiment 
were engaged in the battle of Bunker Hill, and 
in Arnold's Quebec expedition. The family tradition 
runs that before leaving home Hooker freed his 
slaves, saying that he could not " fight for liberty and 
leave slaves at home." He died in service at Roxbury, 
November 26, 1775. 

TALCOTT, MARY KINGSBURY. 

{No. 120. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-granddaughter of ELIZUR TALCOTT, 
Colonel of the 6th regiment of Connecticut militia, 
which participated in the campaign around New 
York, August to September, 1776. 

Also, great-granddaughter of CHARLES SEY- 
MOUR. [See Hale, Julia Lucy.] 

Also, great-great-granddaughter of E F H R A L M 
KLNGSBURY, a member of a company that marched 
from Coventry for the relief of Boston in the Lexing- 
ton alarm. 

Also, great-granddaughter of GEORGE TALCOTT, 
a member of a company that went from Glastonbury 
for the relief of Boston in the Lexington alarm. 



513 

Also, great-granddaughter of ANDREW KINGS- 
BURY, of Hartford (i 759-1837), who enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Colonel Chester's regiment in Jtine, 1776, and 
was in the battle of Long Island, in the rear guard 
of Washington's army in the retreat from Long 
Island, and in the action at White Plains; discharged 
December 25, 1776. He enlisted again, April, 1777, in 
Colonel John Chandler's regiment, was transferred to 
the Surgeon-General's department, December 15, 1778, 
and remained there until March 13, 1781, when he 
became clerk in the office of Ralph Pomeroy, Deputy 
Quartermaster-General at Hartford, where he remained 
until September, 1783. He was afterward treasurer 
of the State of Connecticut, for twenty-five years. 

TAYLOR, ALBERT FONES. 

(No. Q2J. Admitted April z/, 18^4^) Of Stonington, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Stonington. 

Great-great-grandson of ELIJAH LEWIS of West- 
erly, Rhode Island (1741 ), a Lieutenant in Col- 
onel J. M. Varnum's Rhode Island regiment, 1775; 
appointed Captain in the ist Continental battalion, 1777 

*TAYLOR, HENRY WYLLYS. 

(No. ip4. Admitted Feb. 4,i8go.) Of Hartford, Connecti- 
cut; secretary of the Humane Society of Connecticut; 
born at Mendon, New York. Died August 21, 1894. 

Great-grandson of MOSES ALLEN. ^See Year Book, 
i8pj-4, p. j8j, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 

TAYLOR, JAMES PALMER. 

(No. 2/1. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; cashier of the Charter Oak National Bank; 
born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of ELD AD TA YLOR, of West- 
field, Massachusetts (1708 ), a member of the 

General Court of Massachusetts. 



5H 

Also, great-grandson of MATTHEW SMITH. S^See 
Smithy George Brainard.^ 

TAYLOR, SAMUEL. 

(No. 301. Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of the Reverend AARON KINNE. 
\^See Cur tin, Roland Gideon.^ 

TAYLOR, THOMAS PORTER. 

(No. 216. Admitted Feb. 77, i8go.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Great-great-grandson of ANDREW PORTER, of 
Philadelphia (1743 ), who was commissioned Cap- 
tain of marines on board the frigate "Effingham," 
June 19, 1776. Afterward, at his own request, he was 
transferred to the artillery. He was made Major in 
1782, and at the disbanding of the army he was Col- 
onel of the 4th Pennsylvania regiment of artillery. 
After the close of the war he became Major-General 
of Pennsylvania militia. 

THAYER, GEORGE BURTON. 

(No. y2(p. Admitted Sept. 13, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; superintendent organized charities; born at 
Vernon, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of JEREMIAH IRONS, of 
Gloucester, Rhode Island (i 748-1840), who enlisted at 
Gloucester in the month of October, 1776, and was 
discharged finally, some time in the year 1781, having 
served at different periods: two months as private, six 
months and twenty days as Sergeant, two months as 
Ensign, and two months as Lieutenant. Nearly all 
the above service was rendered in Captain Stephen 
Winsor's company, in Colonel Brown's regiment of 
Rhode Island militia. He was a pensioner. 



515 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of JOHN SA YLES 

(1723 ), of Smithfield, Rhode Island, who, in 1775, 

was appointed on a committee to prepare an act for 
the purpose of raising a regiment of soldiers, and was 
chosen Colonel of the regiment in 1776. In 1777, the 
Rhode Island legislature ordered a bill of £^2i^ paid 
him " for small arms, etc., for the use of the militia of 
Smithfield during the late expedition against Rhode 
Island." He was appointed in 1780 to receive recruits 
for the town of Smithfield; and was chosen assist- 
ant from that town several times during the war. 

THOMAS, (MRS.) ANNA HILL. 

(No. 5^5. Admitted June 75, i8gi.) Of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts; wife of Joseph B. Thomas; born at Albany, 
New York. 

Great-granddaughter of EBENEZER HILL. \^See 
Hill, Ebenezer.'] 

THOMAS, EDGAR. 

(No. 884. Admitted Eeb. 12, 18^4.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at New Haven. 

Great-great-grandson of JACOB POWLES (1757- 
1837), who entered the service at Closter, New Jersey, 
1776, under Colonel Dayton; discharged 1781; served 
under Captains Warring, Goetschias, Blanch, Rominie, 
and Christie. 

THOMPSON, ISAAC WALTER. 

(No. 413. Admitted Dec. 22, i8go.) Of New London, 
Connecticut; town clerk and registrar; born at New 
London. 

Great-grandson of Lieutenant WILLIAM THOMP- 
SON. \_See Shelton, Charles Egerton.'\ 

THOMPSON, JAMES WILCOX. 

(N0.1013. Admitted May 10, i8ps-) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Stamford, Connecticut. 



5i6 

Great-g:reat-grandson of DAVID THOMPSON, Jr. 
(i 749-181 7), of Stratford, Connecticut, who was ap- 
pointed by the General Assembly in October, 1777, 
Lieutenant of the 5 th company of the 4th regiment 
of Connecticut militia, and in October, 1783, was ap- 
pointed Captain of the same company. 

THOMPSON, RHODA AUGUSTA. 

(No. yjo. Admitted Jan. d, i8gj.) Of Woodbury, Con- 
necticut; born at Woodstock, New York. 

Daughter of THADDEUS THOMPSON, of Beth- 
any and Woodbridge, Connecticut (i 762-1829). He first 
served as a drummer boy, and later as bombardier in 
Colonel Lamb's regiment of artillery. 

THOMPSON, SHERWOOD STRATTON. 

(No. 460. Admitted Feb. 18, t8^i.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at New Haven, 

Great-grandson of J ED U THAN THOMPSON, 

of West Haven, Connecticut ( 1779), who enlisted 

February 9, 1779, in Captain Bradley's company of 
matrosses, and was killed July 5, 1779, at Tryon's 
invasion of New Haven. 

THOMSON, ARTHUR CECIL. 

(No. yji. Ad??iitted Sept. ij, i8p2.) Of Brookline, Mas- 
sachusetts; born at New Haven, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELIJAH LEWIS. \^See Lewis, 
Charles JV.] 

THRESHER, SENECA SANFORD. 

(No. 466. Admitted March 16, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Swansea, Massachusetts. 

Grandson of AARON THRESHER, of Rehoboth, 
Massachusetts, a private in Colonel Thomas Carpen- 
ter's regiment of Massachusetts militia, which was at 
least twice in active service. 



5^7 

Also, grandson of THOMAS HANDY, oi vSwansea, 

Massachusetts (1753 ), who enlisted in April, 1781, 

under Captain Thomas Turner, in the regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Henry Jackson. He was a pen- 
sioner. 

TODD, MILO APOLLOS. 

(No.iijo. Admitted Feb. 22, 1 8g6.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; life insurance; born at North Branford, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of THELUS TODD ( 1 763-1846), of Wal- 
lingford, Connecticut, who was drafted into service in 
the summer of 1781, and served at New London and 
at Fort Griswold under Colonel Ledyard. After six 
weeks' service he was taken ill and escorted home by 
two soldiers. He was discharged near the end of 
the war. 

TOLLES, CHARLES LEVI 

(No. S72. Admitted Sept. 75, i8gi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of CLARK TOLLES (1758-1832), a 
member of Major John Skinner's troop of Light Horse 
at New York in 1776; also, a member of Captain Jehiel 
Bryant's company, in the 2d regiment of Connecticut 
militia, at Peekskill, in October, 1777. 

TOWNSEND, JOSEPH HENDLEY. 

(No. 4jy. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of /6>i77\^ TOWNSEND (1749-1833), 
a private in Arnold's company from New Haven, in 
the Lexington alarm, 1775. He also served among the 
defenders of New Haven at the time of the invasion 
by the British in 1779, and was taken prisoner. 

Also, great-grandson oi JAMES ICLER STED 
MANSFLELD, who was a member of Arnold's com- 
pany from New Haven, in the Lexington alarm, 1775. 



5i8 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILLIAM HEND- 
LEY, who was one of the Boston tea-party, and who 
fought at Concord and at Bunker Hill. 

TRACY, DAVID WALLACE. 

(No. 660. Admitted March 26, 1892.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at Windsor, Vermont. 

Great-grandson of MANASSAH CADY (1758-1833), 
a member of the Connecticut regiment commanded by 
Colonel Andrew Ward. He was at Fort Washington 
and Fort Lee, and participated in the fighting at White 
Plains. In the summer of 1779 he served in Colonel 
John Durkee's regiment on the east side of the Hud- 
son. He also served nine months from April, 1780, as 
a Corporal of marines on the Continental frigate 
" Trumbull." He was on board the "Trumbull " when 
she fought the British frigate *' Watts." 

TRACY, LEMUEL HOWARD. 

(No. 661. Admitted March 26, i8p2.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; druggist; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of MANASSAH CADY. [See Tracy, 
David Wallace.^ 

TRACY, LOUIS DOWNER. 

(No. 1 01 4. Admitted May 10, 18^5.) Of Willimantic, 
Connecticut; born at Willimantic. 

Great-grandson of EDWARD YEOMANS (1759- 
1840), of Columbia, Connecticut, who served as a pri- 
vate in the Connecticut troops and was granted a 
pension. 

TREADWELL, JOHN PRIME. 

(No. 634. Admitted Eeb. 13, i8p2.) Of Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; born at New York city. 

Great-grandson of ELIFHALET LOCK WOOD. 
[See Lockwood, Frederick St. John.'] 



519 

TREAT, ARTHUR BARNES. 

(No. 1068, Admitted Dec. 16, i8qS-) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; builder; born at Orange, Connecticut, 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN BARNES. ^See 
Barnes., Thomas Attwater.'\ 

TROWBRIDGE, FRANCIS BACON. 

{No. 406. Admitted Dec. 22^ i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; lawyer; born at New Haven. 

Great -great -great -grandson of HENRY CHAM- 
PION, Sr. \See Gilbert, Charles Edwin.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of EPAPHRODITUS 
CHAMPION, of East Haddam, Assistant Deputy 
Commissary. He was in service from April 9, 1776, to 
January 22, 1780. 

Also, great-great-grandson of ASA BACON, of Can- 
terbury, who was Captain of the 6th company, 6th 
battalion, Wadsworth's brigade, which command ac- 
companied Washington on his retreat through New 
Jersey, 1776. 

Also, great-great-grandson oiRULOEF DUTCH ER, 
of Salisbury, Captain in the 5th regiment of Light 
Horse, May, 1776; also. Captain of a militia company 
raised to repel the enemy at New Haven, July, 1779. 

Also, great -great -grandson of RUTHERFORD 
TROWBRIDGE, of New Haven, who had the first 
bounty for making saltpetre for the State in the 
Revolution. He also turned out with a New Haven 
company at the time of Tryon's invasion in July, 1779, 
and the musket he then used is now in possession of 
the New Haven County Historical Society. 

TROWBRIDGE, THOMAS RUTHERFORD. 

(No. io6g. Admitted Oct. i^, i8p^.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; retired merchant; born at New Haven. 

Great-grandson of R U T H E RE O R D T RO W- 
BRIDGE. \_See Trowbridge, Francis Bacon.] 



S20 

TRUMBULL, JONATHAN. 

(No. i8. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Norwich. 

Great-great-grandson of JONATHAN TRUM- 
BULL. \^See Bull, William Lanman.'] 

Also, great-great grandson of PHLLIP TURNER, 
of Norwich, Connecticut (1740-1815), present as Sur- 
geon at the battle of Bunker Hill. At the October 
session in 1776, he was appointed by the General 
Assembly " Physician and Surgeon for the Connecti- 
cut troops in the Continental service," and director of 
hospital stores. Congress made him Surgeon-General 
of hospitals in the eastern department in 1777, and 
Hospital Physician and Surgeon in the army in 1780. 
He retired in 1781. In 1800 he was appointed Surgeon 
to the staff of the United States army and given the 
medical and surgical care of the troops at the forti- 
fications in the harbor of New York. 

TUBBS, CHARLES WHITING. 

(No. loi^. Admitted June 2g, i8gi.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; music teacher; born at Norwich. 

Grandson of ALAS BRUMLEY {i^6^-i^s^), of Pres- 
ton, Connecticut, who served as a soldier and was 
granted a pension. 

TUCKER, CHARLES ARTHUR. 

(N0.7J2. Admitted April iQ, i8p2.) Of Norwalk; Con- 
necticut; teacher; born at Hartford, Vermont. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH TUCKER, of Kings- 
ton, New Hampshire, and Norwich, Vermont (1753- 
1841), who, for special services rendered in capturing 
tories, was remunerated by the Governor and Council. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOSHUA HAZEN, 
Captain of a company in a New Hampshire regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel John Wood in 1780. 
He was in active service in defense of the frontier 
in 1778-80-81. 



S2I 

TURNER, CHARLES. 

(No. jio. Admitted April i^, i8go.) Of Birmingliam, 
Alabama; attorney-at-law; born at New London, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of Captain JOHN WILLIAMS, of 
Groton, Connecticut (1739-1781), killed at Fort Gris- 
wold, September 6, 1781. 

Also, great-grandson of PETER COM STOCK. \^See 
Chapman, D wight ^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of ETNA THAN PER- 
KINS, killed at Fort Griswold, September 6, 1781. 

Also, grandson of HENRY MASON, wounded in 
the leg at Fort Griswold, September 6, 1781. 

TURNER, ELISHA. 

(No. 334. Admitted April 75", i8go.) Of Torrington, 
Connecticut; retired from business; born at New Lon- 
don, Connecticut. 

Grandson of PETER COMSTOCK. [See Chapman, 
Dwight.^ 

TURNER, LUTHER GUITEAU. 

(No. 308. Admitted April 13, i8go.) Of Torrington^ 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at New London, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of DANIEL BILLINGS. [See 
Murray, Charles Henry. ^ 

Also, great-grandson of PETER COMSTOCK. [See 
Chapman, D wight ^ 

Also, great-great-grandson of Captain JOHN WIL- 
LIAMS. [See Turner, Charles.'] 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of ELNATHAN 
PERKINS. [See Turner, Charles.] 

Also, great-grandson of HENRY MASON. [See 
Turner, Charles.] 



522 

TWICHELL, JAMES CARTER. 

(No. 7^0. Admitted Feb. 22, i8gj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Southington, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of ELIHU CARTER, of Farming- 
ton, Connecticut (i 759-1844). He served three years 
from 1778 in Captain Gamaliel Painter's company in a 
regiment of artificers. 

Also, great-grandson of ICHABOD CULPEPPER 
FRISBIE, a member of Captain Cole's company in a 
battalion commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Mead in 
1779. 

TWISS, WALDO CLINTON. 

(No. jyi. Admitted Feb. 22, 18^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; real estate and lumber; born at Montreal, 
Province of Quebec, Canada. 

Grandson of JOSEPH TWISS, of Cheshire and 
Meriden, Connecticut (1761-1842), a member of Cap- 
tain William Sizer's company in a regiment of arti- 
ficers. He served three years from February, 1778. 

TYLER, ALICE JANE. 

(No. 733. Admitted April ig, i8p2.) Of Ozone Park, 
Long Island, New York; born at Essex, Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of ABRAHAM TYLER (1734- 
1805), Captain of a company from the town of Had- 
dam, Connecticut, which marched for the relief of 
Boston in the Lexington alarm, 1775; ^^^o Captain in 
the 17th Continental regiment. Colonel Jedediah Hunt- 
ington, 1776; Major in Colonel Samuel McLellan's 
regiment, 1778; and Lieutenant-Colonel of the 7th 
Connecticut militia, 1779. 

TYLER, AUGUST CLEVELAND. 

(No. 138. Admitted Dec. 12, i88p.) Of New London, 
Connecticut. 



523 

Grandson of DANIEL TYLER, Adjutant in Put- 
nam's regiment at the battle of Bunker Hill; and in 
1780, ordered with a company of matrosses to New- 
port. 

TYLER, ROBERT S. 

(No. 1030. Admitted July 5, i8qs). Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Great-great-grandson of OBADIAH JOHNSON. 
YSee Johnson, Charles Coi't.] 

Also, great-great-great-grandson of SAMUEL COIT. 
S^See Coit, George Douglas.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of AARON FULLER 
(1734 ), of Hampton, Connecticut, who was ap- 
pointed, September 8, 1777, by the Council of Safety, 
Captain of the 7th company in the alarm list of the 
2TSt regiment of militia. This company served in the 
alarm when the British shipping lay off New London 
in September, 1779, and again at the time of Tryon's 
invasion at New Haven in July, 1779, 

*TYLER, SYLVANUS. 

(No. 3. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Essex, Connecti- 
cut; born at East Haddam, Connecticut. Died June 
9, 1889. 

Grandson of ABRAHAM TYLER. ySee Year Book, 
i8gi,pp. 180, i8p.] 

UPHAM, CHARLES LESLIE. 

(No. 883. Admitted May 10, 18^3.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Townshend, Vermont. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM UPHAM, of Stur- 
bridge, Massachusetts (i 738-181 2), a member of the 
"committee of safety," of Weathersfield, Vermont, 
June, 1776; he was also Captain of a company of 
militia in 1780. 



5^4 

UPSON, ALBERT STEVENS. 

(No. 1131. Admitted Feb. J, i8p6.) Of Waterbury, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Wolcott, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL UPSON (1737-1816), 
of Wolcott, Connecticut, who served as private in the 
company of Captain James Stoddard, under Colonel 
Noadiah Hooker, at Peekskill, from March 30 to May 
16, 1777. He afterwards served as Captain under Colo- 
nel Smith and Lieutenant-Colonel Gad Stanley, in the 
15th militia regiment in 1778 and 1779, and turned out 
to repel the invasion at New Haven, July 5, 1779. 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA STEVENS. \See 
Lines ^ Edwin Stevens^ 

UPSON, LYMAN ALLYN. 
(No. 318. Admitted April 13, 1 8go.) Of Thompson ville, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Westfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Grandson of SIMEON UPSON. ^See Houston, James 
Borland.^ 

Also, great-grandson of NATHAN ALLYN. [See 
Housto7i, James Borland.'] 

VAN DEURSEN, WILLIAM WALTER. 

(No. 123. Admitted Dec. 12, i88q.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; bookkeeper. 

Grandson of WILLIAM VAN DEURSEN, ap- 
pointed January i, 1781, Captain of a company of State 
Guards, stationed at New Haven for the defense of the 
coast. Also, commander of the brig " Middletown," 
which served as a privateer during a part of the war. 

VEADER, DANIEL HICKS. 
(No. pp2. Admitted Feb. 11, i8g^.) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; with Winchester Arms company; born at 
New Haven. 



525 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL HICKS (1757-1840), 
of New Haven, Connecticut, who went from New Lon- 
don in the Lexington alarm in the company of Captain 
William Coit, under Colonel Samuel H. Parsons, and 
served for eight days. In 1779 he served for three 
months as substitute in the company of Captain Amos 
Gilbert. In 1780 he served for three and a half months 
as substitute in the company of Captain John Miles, 
under Colonel Lamb, and in 1781 he served for two 
months as a substitute in the company of Captain 
Jared Robinson. He was a pensioner. 

VERPLANCK, FREDERICK AVER. 

(No. yj4. Admitted Sept. 13, i8p2.) Of South Manchester, 
Connecticut; teacher; born at Brooklyn, New York. 

Great-grandson of ELI HARTSHORN, of Franklin, 
Connecticut (i 758-1825), a member of Captain Nehe- 
miah Waterman's company detached from the 20th 
regiment of Connecticut militia to serve a three 
months' term in a regiment commanded by Colonel 
Nathan Gallup, to co-operate with Count D'Estaing, 
November, 1779. 

VIETS, CARL JAY. 

(No. djs- Admitted Feb. 13, 18^2.) Of New London, Con- 
necticut; bookseller; born at East Granby, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of HEZEKIAH WADS- 
WORTH. \^See Filer, Anson Priest?^ 

VIETS, (MRS.) MARY COMSTOCK. 

(No. 438. Admitted Feb. 2, i8gi.) Of New London, Con- 
necticut; born at East Lyme, Connecticut. 

Great-granddaughter of SETH SMITH, of Lyme, 
Connecticut (i 753-1840), a Sergeant in the Revolution- 
ary service, probably in Colonel Latimer's regiment. 

35 



526 

Also, great-great-granddaughter of CAPTAIN 
PETER COMSTOCK. [See Chapman, JDwight'] 

Also, great-great-granddaughter of C A P T A IN 
MOSES WARREN. [See Chapman, Bwight'] 

*WADSWORTH, EDWARD. 

(No.6p. Admitted April 20, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Hartford. Died November 18, 1893. 

Grandson of JONATHAN WADSWORTH. [See 
Year Book, 1893-4, pp. 392, 42^.] 

WADSWORTH, ROBERT ANDERSON. 

(No. 772. Admitted Feb. 22, 1893.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of JONATHAN WADSWORTH, 
of Hartford, Connecticut (1739-1777), Captain of a 
company in Colonel Thaddeus Cook's regiment. He 
was killed in a skirmish the night before Burgoyne's 
surrender at Saratoga, October, 1777. 

*WAINWRIGHT, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS MUHLEN- 
BERG. 
(No. 461. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; physician and surgeon; born in New York 
city. Died September 23, 1894. 

Great-grandson of JOHN PHEIPS. [See Year Book, 
1893-4, p. 3p2, and obituary. Year Book, i8g^-6^ 

WAIT, JOHN TURNER. 

(No. 162. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; attorney-at'law; born at New London, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of Dr. PHIIIP TURNER. [See Trum- 
bull, Jonathan?^ 

WALBRIDGE, THOMAS CHESTER. 

(No. 6^2. Adinitted April ip, 1892.) Of Germantown, 
Pennsylvania; born at Lansingburgh, New York. 



5^7 

Great-great-grandson of EDWARD MOTT, of Pres- 
ton, Connectictit. On the 26th of April, 1775, he was 
appointed Captain of the 7th company in the 6th Con- 
necticut regiment, commanded by Colonel Samuel 
Holden Parsons. He arrived at Hartford April 28. 
He was at once requested to become one of the com- 
mittee in charge of the expedition against Ticonderoga 
and Crown Point, which had been set on foot by gen- 
tlemen connected with the General Assembly. He 
took fifteen men from Connecticut — it was not thought 
best to add more, that the business might better be 
kept secret — raised thirty-nine in western Massachu- 
setts, and set out to join the other members of the 
committee at Bennington. An express was sent to 
meet the party on the road, informing them that the 
garrison at Ticonderoga had been reinforced, \vas 
every way on its guard, and that it was best to pro- 
ceed no farther. The party, nevertheless, proceeded 
to Bennington, and there, says Captain Mott, " I in- 
quired why they sent back to me to dismiss the expe- 
dition, when neither our men from Albany nor the 
reconnoitering party had returned. They said they 
did not think that we 'should succeed. I told them 
that fellow they saw knew nothing about the garrison; 
that I had seen him since, and had examined him 
strictly, and that he was a lying fellow and had not 
been at the fort; . . . that the accounts we had would 
not do to go back with and tell in Hartford." Captain 
Mott was made chairman of the committee, which 
also made Colonel Ethan Allen the military com- 
mander of the expedition. On the morning of the 
loth of May, 1775, Ticonderoga was surprised, and 
Captain Delaplace and his command were taken pris- 
oners and sent to Hartford. Later in the same year 
he served with his company in the northern depart- 
ment, and he was with the detachment led by Mont- 
gomery in person in the unsuccessful assault upon. 
Quebec in December. In that action he bore himself 



528 

with distinguished bravery. In February, 1776, he was 
appointed to the command of the fort at Groton, and 
in July of that year made Major of Colonel Fisher 
Gay's regiment, in Wadsvv^orth's brigade. This regi- 
ment served at the Brooklyn front during the battle 
of Long Island, and was with the main army in New 
York and at White Plains. 

Also, great-grandson of JONAS MORGAN, of Pres- 
ton, Connecticut (1752-1824), Ensign of the ist com- 
pany in Colonel Samuel McClellan's regiment in 
1777. 

Also, great-grandson of EB EN EZER WAL- 
BRIDGE, of Bennington, Vermont (1738-1819), who 
served as Lieutenant, Captain, Brigade-Major, Major, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, and Colonel, commanding a regi- 
ment of infantry. He is believed to have assisted in 
the capture of Ticonderoga, and was present at the 
siege of Quebec and the battle of Bennington. 

Also, great-great-grandson of JOHN KNICKER- 
BACKER, of Schaghticoke, New York (1723-1802)^ 
Colonel of the 14th regiment, Albany County militia, 
1775-1778. He was at Fort Edward July 18, 1777, and 
his brigade took part in the second battle of Saratoga, 
October 7, 1777. 

Also, great-grandson of JOHN KNICKERB ACKER, 
Jr. (1751-1827), a member of Captain Jacob Yates' 
company, in the 14th regiment, Albany County, New 
York, militia, commanded by his father's successor. 
Colonel Peter Yates. 

*WALKER, JAMES. 

(No. pjy. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; broker; born at Woodstock, Connecticut. 
Died August 15, 1895. 

Great-grandson of P HI N EH AS WALKER (1738- 
1829) of Woodstock, Connecticut, who was a Sergeant 
in the company of Captain Benjamin Lyon of Wood- 
stock, who went to the relief of Boston in the Lexing- 



529 

ton alarm. He also served as Ensign in the company 
of Lieutenant Tucker, in the nth regiment, Connecti- 
cut militia, in 1776. It is a tradition in the family 
that he loaned the government $1,000 in silver, and 
received in return certain lands in Vermont. 

Also, grandson of WILLARD CHILD (1758-1844), 
of Woodstock, Connecticut, who was a member of 
Captain Lyon's company in the nth Connecticut regi- 
ment of militia in 1776. He carried despatches after 
the battle of Hubbardston, Vermont, and was at Long 
Island and White Plains. He was a pensioner. \_See 
obituary^ Year Book^ 18^^-6?^ 

WARD, WILLIAM. 

(No. 662. Admitted March 26, i8q2.) Of Naugatuck, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Waterbury, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of CULPEPER HO AD LEY, of Water- 
bury, Connecticut (1764-1857), who, in 1778, was a 
member of the company commanded by Captain Jesse 
Curtiss, in the Connecticut regiment of Colonel Thad- 
deus Cook. 

WARNER, EDGAR MORRIS. 

(No. j6g. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of Putnam, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Great-grandson of JOHN AVERY, of Groton, Con- 
necticut, a Sergeant in Captain Burrows' company of 
the 8th regiment, Connecticut militia, at New York, 
1776. 

WARNER, HENRY ABIJAH. 

(No. 1031. Admitted May 10, i8ps-) Of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Waterville, Connecticut. . 

Great-grandson of JASON FENN (1751-1819), of 
Waterbury, Connecticut, who served as Sergeant of 
the 8th company of the ist regiment, under Captain 
Phineas Porter. 



530 

WARREN, HERBERT CLEVELAND. 

(No. 886. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; banker; born at Derby, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL PECK. [See 
Peck J Charles.^ 

WARREN, TRACY BRONSON. 

(No. loyo. Admitted Sept. 16, i8pj.J Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; hotel keeper; born at Watertown, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of EDWARD WARREN (1761- 
i8i4),of Waterbury, Connecticut, who was a private in 
the company of Captain Samuel Augustus Barker, in 
the 4th regiment, Connecticut line, formation of 1781- 
1783, commanded by Colonel Zebulon Butler, in serv- 
ice from January i to December 31, 1781. He also, 
during the same time, served in a company of lis^ht 
infantry under the command of Marquis de Lafayette 
at the southward. 

WARREN, WILLIAM WATTS JONES. 

(No. ppj. Admitted Feb. 11, i8ps.J Of New York city; 
manufacturer; born at Lyme, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of MOSES WARREN [See 
Chapman., Dwight^ 

Also, great-grandson of JOSEPH PECK, who was 
2d Lieutenant in the company of Captain Van Duer- 
sen, in General Waterbury's brigade, stationed at New 
Haven in 1 781. 

Also, great-grandson of ELISHA WA F, who was a 
soldier and pensioner. 

WATEROUS, THOMAS CLIFFORD. 

(No. PP4. Admitted Dec. 10, 18^4.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at East Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-great-grandson of SAMUEL LEE, of Wind- 
ham, Connecticut, who was a Surgeon on the staff of 



531 

Colonel Durkee, in the 4tli regiment, Connectictit line, 
formation of 1777-1781, commissioned January i, 1777, 
and resigned April 3, 1778. He was also surgeon on 
board the state ship "Oliver Cromwell." 

WATSON, (MRS.) ALICE CHEEVER LYON. 

(No. 5p(9. Admitted Oct. 20, i8gi.) Wife of General 
Thomas Lansdell Watson of Bridgeport, Connecticut; 
born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-granddaughter of /^J/^5 FRYE. \See 
Lyon^ Ernest Porter.^ 

Also, great-granddaughter of FREDERICK FRYE. 
\^See Lyon^ Ernest Porter?^ 

Also, granddaughter oi N E H E M I A H WEBB 
LYON. \^See Lyon, Ernest Porter.^ 

WATSON, THOMAS LANSDELL. 

{No. 5gi. Admitted Oct. 20, i8gi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; banker; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-grandson of EBENEZER MERRITT. \^See 
Drew, Henry Burr.^ 

WEBB, ARTHUR BACKUS. 

(No. 303. Admitted March 2g, i8qo.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; clerk; born at Norwich. 

Great-great-grandson of iV^r^y^iV/^Z WEBB. \^See 
Lathrop, Henry Clinton.'] 

Also, great-great-grandson of WATERMAN 
CLIFT. [See Lathrop, Henry Clinton?^ 

WEBB, RODOLPHUS LOVEJOY. 

(No. 2g2. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of West Hartford, 
Connecticut; superintendent of corporation; born at 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of WILLIAM GRISWOLD, a pri- 
vate soldier from the town of Wethersfield, in the 
Lexington alarm, April, 1775. 



532 

¥/EBSTER, (MRS.) ELIZABETH SIZER. 

(No. 637. Admitted Feb. 13, i8g2.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Chester, Massachusetts. 

Granddaughter of WILLIAM SIZER, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut (1746-1826), commissioned July 26, 
1777, Lieutenant of a company of artificers in the reg- 
iment commanded by Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin, of 
Massachusetts. He was made Captain, May i, 1778. 

WELLES, EDWIN. 

(No. 230. Adfnitted Feb. ly, i8qo.) Of Newington, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Newington, 

Grandson of ROGER WELLES, of Wethersfield, 
Connecticut (1753-1795), 2d Lieutenant, January i, 1777, 
in the regiment commanded by Colonel Webb, and 
later by promotion, ist Lieutenant and Captain. This 
regiment went into camp at Peekskill in the spring of 
1777, 3-^^ served in the state of New York till the 
summer of 1778, when it marched to Rhode Island, 
and there took part in the battle of August 29th, 
under General Sullivan, and was commended for its 
conduct. In 1781, Captain Welles was in command of 
a company, from the 3d Connecticut regiment, forming 
part of a body of picked troops placed under command 
of General Lafayette, for the express purpose of 
marching rapidly to Virginia to check Arnold's inva- 
sion, and, if possible, to effect his capture. This de- 
tachment remained in Virginia, almost constantly on 
the march, until Cornwallis took post at Yorktown in 
August. At the siege Lafayette's division held the 
post of honor on the right of the investing line. Cap- 
tain Welles' company formed part of the column that 
stormed one of the enemy's redoubts on the night of 
October 14, 1781, and he was slightly wounded by a 
bayonet thrust in the leg. He remained in service 
until the fighting was ended. After the close of the 
war he was Brigadier-General of Connecticut militia. 
He was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 



533 

WELLES, JAMES HOWARD. 
(No. j/o. Admitted Sept. lo, i8po.) Of Norwich, Con- 
necticut; banking; born at Glastonbury, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL WELLES, of Glaston- 
bury, Connecticut (i 731-1800), a Captain in Colonel 
Gay's regiment, 2d battalion, Wadsworth's brigade, 
which served at the Brooklyn front, during the battle 
of Long Island, August 27th; in the retreat to New 
York, August 28-3oth; and in the retreat from New 
York city, September 15th. He was taken prisoner 
September 15, 1776, and held prisoner in New York 
until June, 1778, when he was exchanged. He also 
took part in repelling the enemy at the time of Tryon's 
invasion of Connecticut, July, 1779. 

Also, grandson of SAMUEL WELLES, Jr., of Glas- 
tonbury, Connecticut, who served as a private soldier 
in the Lexington alarm, April, 1775. 

WELLES, JOHN N. 

(No. 1071. Admitted Dec. 16, i8gs-) Ol Wethersfield, 
Connecticut; dentist; born at Wethersfield. 

Great-grandson of ROGER WELLES. S^See Welles, 
Edwin.'] 

WELLS, CHAUNCEY WETMORE. 

(No. 88'j. Admitted Sept. 12, iSgj.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; student; born at Baltimore, Maryland. 

Great-grandson of ELLSHA HUBBARD. \_See Hub- 
bard, Josiah Meigs.] 

WELLS, OSMER BEACH. 

(No. 888. Admitted Jan. 16, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; boot and shoemaker; born at Bridgeport. 

Grandson of GIDEON WELLS, of Stratford, Con- 
necticut (1761-1840), who enlisted March 19, 1777, in 
Captain Hart's company, Colonel Samuel B. Webb's 
regiment, and was discharged March 10, 1780. He was 
a pensioner. 



534 

WESSELS, HENRY WALTON. 

(No. 663. Admitted March 26, i8g2.) Of Litchfield, 
Connecticut; insurance; born at New Milford, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-great-grandson of AARON STRONG (1736- 
1777), a member of Captain Lemuel Pomeroy's com- 
pany, in Colonel John Dickinson's regiment of Massa- 
chusetts militia. He was killed at Saratoga, October 
16, 1777. 

WHAPLES, MEIGS HEYWOOD. 

(No. 4. Admitted April 2, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; president of the Connecticut Trust and Safe 
Deposit Company; born at New Britain, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of JOHN MEIGS, of Middletown, 
Connecticut, who was commissioned January i, 1777, 
Ensign in the Continental regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Samuel B. Webb. He was made ist Lieuten- 
ant and Adjutant of the regiment in 1778. The regi- 
ment participated in the battle of Quaker Hill, August 
29, 1778, and was commended for its conduct. He 
continued with the regiment, reorganized as the 3d 
regiment, Connecticut line, in 1781 and 1783. He was 
a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. After the 
close of the war he became a Captain in the regular 
army and Brigade-Major. 

*WHEELER, JOSEPH KELLOGG. 

(No. 462. Admitted Feb. 18, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at Bloomfield, Connecticut. Died 
October 10, 1894. 

Great-grandson oi DANIEL KELLOGG. ^See Year 
Book, i8pj-4, p. J pp, and obituary, Year Book, i8p^-d.] 

WHEELER, ROBERT BROWN. 

(No. 241. Admitted Feb; 17, i8po.) Of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts; express; born at Bridgeport, Connecticut. 



535 

Great - great - grandson of EPHRAIM MIDDLE- 
BROOK. \^See Middlebrook, William Nash.'\ 

Also, great-grandson of PHILO LEWIS, of Strat- 
ford, Connecticut, a Revolationary soldier, and pen- 
sioner. 

WHITE, HERBERT HUMPHREY. 

(No.ygi. Admitted April 1 8, 1 8(p3.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; assistant cashier of the Phoenix National 
Bank; born at Hartford. 

Great-grandson of SAMUEL COLTON, of Stafford 
and Bloomfield, Connecticut (1754-1823), a member of 
the 7th company, commanded by Captain Abel Petti- 
bone, in the 2d regiment, commanded by Colonel 
Joseph Spencer, raised on the first call for troops, 
April-May, 1775. ^ part of this regiment participated 
in the battle of Bunker Hill. It is known that he was 
under fire, and that a bullet pierced his hat. He was 
a pensioner under act of 181 8. 

WHITING, EZRA. 

(No. 212. Admitted Feb. z/, i8go.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; butcher; born at Stratford. 

Grandson of STILES JUDSON. ^See Judson, Stiles?^ 

WHITNEY, ELI, Jr. 

(No. jyi. Admitted Sept. 10, i8go.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; president New Haven Water company; 
born at I?Tew Haven. 

Great-grandson of PIERREPONT EDWARDS, of 
New Haven, Connecticut (i 750-1826), a member of the 
2d company Governor's Foot Guards, 1775; member of 
the Continental Congress, 1787-8. 

WHITTLESEY, HEMAN ALONZO. 

(No, 2J4. Admitted March 2g, i8go.) Of Newington, Con- 
necticut; farmer; born at Stockbridge, Massachusetts. 



53^ 

Great-grandson of MARTIN KELLOGG, a ist 
Lieutenant in the Wethersfield company commanded 
by Captain Chester, in the Lexington alarm. In 1777 
he commanded a company in the 6th Connecticut 
militia. 

WILCOX, DWIGHT PARKER. 

(No. 1 132. Admitted Feb. 22^ i8g6.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut ; manufacturer; born at Meriden, 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN PARKER. {^See 
Parker., Charles.'] 

WILCOX, HENRY SCOVIL. 

(No. 88g. Admitted May 10, i8gj.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Meriden. 

Great-grandson of AMOS WHITE, of Chatham, 
Connecticut (1745-1825), a Quartermaster in the 2d 
Connecticut regiment of Light Horse. 

WILCOXSON, ALBERT. 

(No. sp. Admitted April 25, i88g.) Of Stratford, Con- 
necticut; surveyor; born at Stratford. 

Grandson oiEPHRAIM J. WILCOXSON, a private 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

WILDMAN, LEONARD DELACOUR. 

(N0.1016. Admitted April ig, i8g2.) Of Danbury, Con- 
necticut; mechanical engineer; born at Danbury. 

Great-great-great-grandson of SAMUEL CAUL- 
FIELD (1726-1789), of New Milford, Connecticut, 
who was commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel in October, 
1776, and with Colonel Whiting and others organ- 
ized the ist battalion to serve from November, 1776, to 
March, 1777, under Generals Wooster and Spencer. In 
January, 1779, he is mentioned in Fitch's report as 
an issuing Commissary in the line. In June, 1779, 
he resigned his appointment as Commissary and pro- 



537 

ceeded to Horse Neck, where he took command of the 
13th Connecticut. Later in 1781 he commanded his 
own regiment at West Point and east of the Hudson 
river. 

WILEY, JAMES ALLEN. 

(No. 344. Admitted June 5, i8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Hartford. 

Great-great-grandson of NATHANIEL WILEY, 

of Reading, Massachusetts (1729 ), a member of 

the Massachusetts regiment commanded by Colonel 
David Green in April, 1775. 

*WILEY, WILLIAM HENRY. 

(No.2pi. Admitted March 2^,1 8go.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; born at South Reading, Massachusetts. Died 
November 4, 1892. 

Great-grandson of NATHANIEL WILEY. [See 
Year Book, 18^3-4, pp. 401, 412.'] 

WILLIAMS, AARON WHITE COOK. 

(No. 484. Admitted April 21, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Manchester, Con- 
necticut. 

Great -great -great -grandson of Captain JOEL 
WHITE. [See Pond, Philip, 2d.] 

WILLIAMS, FRANK BACKUS. 

(No. 'J 44. Admitted Jan. 26, i8pj.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; lawyer; born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Great-great-grandson of ANDREW BACKUS. 
[See Backus, Thomas.] 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE. 
(No. 263. Admitted March 2g, i8po.) Of Hartford, 
Connecticut; born at Bethel, Connecticut. 



538 

Grandson of CLEMENT FAIRCHILD, of Taunton, 

Connecticut (1764 ), a private soldier in the 4th 

regiment, Connecticut line. 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE CLINTON FAIRCHILD. 
(No. 263. Admitted March 2p^ iSpo.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Cheshire, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of CLEMENT FAIRCHILD. ^See 
Williams^ George. 1 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE GOODWIN. 

(No. 4PS' Admitted May 4, i8pi.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; manufacturer; born at Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH BAKER. \^See Hooker, 
Edward Williams^ 

WILLIAMS, JAMES BAKER. 

(No. 638. Admitted Feb. 13, i8p2.) Of Glastonbury, 
Connecticut; manufacturer; born at Lebanon, Con- 
necticut. 

Grandson of JOSEPH BAKER. \See Hooker, Ed- 
ward Williams^ 

WILSON, CLAUDE LUCAS. 

(No. pps- Admitted Feb. 22, iSpS.) Of Middletown, 
Connecticut; born at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of THOMAS LUCAS (1757-1824), 
of Middletown, Connecticut, who served in the com- 
pany of Captain Jonathan Johnson, in Colonel Philip 
Burr Bradley's battalion, in the brigade of General 
Wadsworth, in 1776. 

WILSON, GEORGE WILLIAM. 

(No. 1072. Admitted Dec. 16, i8ps.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; clothier; born at Lee, Massachusetts. 



539 

Great-great-grandson of CHARLES COLTON 
(1724-1809), of Springfield, Massachusetts, who served 
as Captain in the regiment of Colonel Ruggles Wood- 
bridge in 1776, and in the regiment of Colonel John 
Greaton in 1777, 1778 and 1779. 

WILSON, GROVE HERRICK. 

(No. yyj. Admitted Jan. 26, iSc^j.) Of Meriden, Con- 
necticut; physician; born at Stockbridge, Massachu- 
setts. 

Grandson of DANIEL HERRICK, of Coventry, 
Connecticut (1762-1843), in 1781, a Sergeant in Cap- 
tain William Moulton's company, forming a part of 
General David Waterbury's state brigade, raised for 
defense of the sea coasts. In July the brigade joined 
Washington at Phillipsburg. 

WILSON, OLIVER EUGENE. 

(No. IOJ2.' Admitted June ly, i^pS-) O^ Norwalk, Con- 
necticut; insurance; born at Harwinton, Connecticut. 

Great-grandson of PHINEAS GRISWOLD (1750- 
-), of Windsor, Connecticut, who enlisted in May, 



T777, for three years in the company of Captain John 
Harmon, in the regiment commanded by Colonel 
Durkee, and was on du.ty at New York, guarding 
Burgoyne's troops. 

*WOODBRIDGE, JAMES E. 

(No. 28'j. ■ Admitted March 2p, i8go.) Of Collinsville, 
Connecticut; born at Simsbury, Connecticut. Died 
January 2, 1891. 

Great-grandson of THEOPHILUS WOOD- 
BRIDGE. l^See Year Book, i8gi,pp. 187, ipy.] 

WOODWARD, HENRY. 

(No. 246. Admitted Feb. 17, i8qo.) Of Middletown, Con- 
necticut; druggist; born at Middletown. 



540 

Grandson of JOHN FRATT, of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, a Lieutenant in the Continental army, who, 
in 1779, was acting as Assistant Commissary-General 
under General James Clinton. He was a member of 
the Society of the Cincinnati. 

WOODWARD, JOSEPH GURLEY. 

(No. 132. Admitted Dec. 12, i88g.) Of Hartford, Con- 
necticut; stock broker; born at Willimantic, Connecti- 
cut. 

Great-grandson of JOSEPH WOODWARD. {See 
Knight^ William Ward.'\ 

WOODWORTH, HENRY LEROY. 

(No. 8qo. Admitted Oct. 77, 18^3.) Of South Norwalk, 
Connecticut; flagman on railroad; born at Suffield, 
Connecticut. 

Grandson of WILLIAM BURNS, born in England 
(1760-1820), who enlisted for the war from Coventry, 
Connecticut, February, 1777, in Captain Paul Brig- 
ham's company, Colonel John Chandler's Connecticut 
regiment. He was engaged in the battles of German- 
town, Monmouth and Yorktown. 

WOOSTER, ALBERT MILLS. 

(No. P24. Admitted March 5, i8g4.) Of Bridgeport, 
Connecticut; patent lawyer; born at Chatham, New 
York. 

Great-grandson of EPHRAIM WOOSTER, of Hunt- 
ington, Connecticut (1755-1838), who served as Cor- 
poral from May 15 to December 9, 1775, in Captain 
Joseph Smith's 8th compan)% Colonel Waterbury's 5th 
Connecticut regiment, raised under the first call for 
troops; served as Sergeant in Captain Joseph Bird- 
sey's company. Colonel Whiting's regiment, in a tour 
at the alarm at New Haven and Fairfield, July 4 to 10, 
1779. 



541 

Also, great-great-grandson of SAMUEL BEARD^ 
born about 1734, at Stratford; a Sergeant in the Rev- 
olutionary war. 

Also, great-great-grandson of WILLIAM COGS- 
WELL, a Captain in New Haven alarm, 1779. In 1781, 
Major in 13th Connecticut regiment. 

Also, great-grandson of THOMAS GILBERT. ^See 
O shorn, N orris Galpin.'] 

WOOSTER, HENRY READ. 

(No. igo. Admitted Feb. 4, i8go.) Of Deep River, Con- 
necticut; treasurer of the Deep River Savings Bank; 
born at Deep River. 

Great-grandson of REYNOLDS WEBB, of Chester, 
Connecticut, a private soldier in Captain Kirtland's 
company in the 6th regiment, Connecticut line, forma- 
tion of 1777-81. 

WOOSTER, IRA BEEBE. 

(No. 8gi. Admitted Feb. 12, 18^4.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; cutler; born at Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Grandson of WALTER WOOSTER, of Milford, 
Connecticut (1747-1829), who enlisted March 2, 1777, 
in Captain Leavenworth's company, 6th regiment, 
Connecticut line, Colonel Meigs; he was discharged 
in February, 1780. 

WORDIN, THOMAS COOK. 

(No. S74- Admitted Oct. 14, i8pi.) Of Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut; banking; born at Bridgeport. 

Great-great-grandson of WILLIAM WORDIN. {See 
Haw ley, Charles Wilson.] 

Also, great-grandson of WILLIAM WORDIN, Jr. 
\See Hawley, Charles Wilson.] 

WRIGHT, WILBUR LESLIE. 

(No. 1133. Admitted Feb. 22, i8g6.) Of Bristol, Con- 
necticut; merchant; born at Bristol. 
36 



542 

Great-grandson of JERIJAH MERRILL (1749- 
1791), of New Hartford, Connecticut, who was a mem- 
ber of the company of Captain Seth Smith which 
marched to Boston in the Lexington alarm in April, 
1775. In 1776 he served under Captain Nehemiah 
Merrill, in the regiment of Colonel Jonathan Petti- 
bone, from August 19 to September 25, in and around 
New York. 

WRIGHT, WILLIAM ALVIN. 

(No. 408. Admitted Dec. 22^ i8po.) Of New Haven, 
Connecticut; attorney-at-law; born at Waukesha, Wis- 
consin. 

Great-grandson of STEPHEN WRIGHT. [See 
Kellogg, Stephen W.] 

YOUNG, EMERSON KINNE. 

(No. lo/j. Admitted Oct. Z5-, 18^^.) Of New Britain, 
Connecticut; clergyman; born at Higginsville, New 

^ York. 

Great-great-grandson of JEREMIAH JACKSON 

(17 1802), of Massachusetts, who was Captain in a 

Massachusetts regiment in the Revolution, He was 
also in the French and Indian war, and was at the 
taking of Quebec under General Wolfe in 1759. He 
afterwards removed to New York, and was a Colonel 
of militia. 





IN MEMORIAM. 

PREPARED BY JONATHAN FLYNT MORRIS, NECROLOGIST. 



WILLIS ROGERS AUSTIN. 

Willis Rogers Austin, of Norwich, died at his home 
on North Washington street, in that city, March 4, 1896. 

Mr. Austin was born in Norwich January 31, 1819. He 
was educated for the bar, graduating at the Yale College 
Law School in the year 1849. 

Shortly after graduating he visited Texas, and it was 
his intention to have located there in the practice of the 
law, but, after some successful operations in cotton, he 
concluded to return north, and, locating in Philadelphia, 
engaged in the banking business. In this he was also 
successful, and having gathered in a few years a fair 
amount of this world's goods, he determined to retire 
from business and take relaxation in travel. He first 
travelled extensively in this country, and then went 
abroad and travelled over Europe and Asia, spending 
three years in his tour. Upon returning to the United 
States he fixed upon Connecticut, the state of his 
ancestors, and Norwich, his native city, as his future 
home, and there he had since resided. 

Mr. Austin had never sought political preferment. 
Personally popular, however, he had often been urged 
to accept office, but steadily refused until, at the urgent 
solicitation of his fellow citizens in Norwich, he con- 
sented to be one of their representatives in the General 
Assembly of 1874. 



544 

In 1875 he was re-elected a representative in the Gen- 
eral Assembly, and in 1876 he was elected Senator from 
the Eighth district of the state. 

Mr, Austin's service in the Legislature was character- 
ized by the most constant and faithful attendance and 
attention to his duties. During the sessions of which 
he was a member he served upon the committees of 
finance, of railroads, and of constitutional amendments. 

After Mr. Austin's term of service in the Senate he 
was induced to serve as a member of the Republican 
State Central Committee for five years, and during the 
years 1877-80 he was president of the New London 
County Agricultural Society. These four years the so- 
ciety experienced marked prosperity. The grounds were 
enlarged, new buildings erected, premiums and expenses 
all paid, and a considerable sum of profit remained 
each year. He had been chairman of the Connecticut 
State Board of Charities. Mr. Austin was a confirmed 
believer in the maxim that occupation and usefulness 
are requirements for the health and happiness of man- 
kind; hence he selected his home with ample grounds 
that he might see the growth of various objects of orna- 
ment and necessity. He always held himself ready to 
discharge all the duties of friend and citizen. 

For almost thirty years Mr. Austin was a prominent 
resident of Norwich and stood high in business circles. 
In all public matters he took a deep interest and was 
anxious to see Norwich progress. He was vice president 
of the Dime Savings Bank and a director in the Second 
National Bank. While " The Elms " existed he was a 
prominent member, was an incorporator of the Norwich 
Club and a member of the Arcanum Club. He was also 
an active worker in the Board of Trade. For many 
years Mr. Austin was a member and faithful attendant 
at Christ Church. 

At the first meeting of the Norwich Club, a few 
months ago, Mr. Austin was elected president, which 
office he held at his death. He was a Mason, belonging 



545 

to a Philadelphia lodge, and at the centennial meeting of 
Somerset Lodge in Norwich, a short time ago, he occu- 
pied the seat of honor in the east. 

The Austin family, of which the deceased was a direct 
descendant, is one of the oldest families of the state. 
The name appears among those of the earlier settlers of 
New Haven, and frequently and prominently in the 
records of the town since. The Austin name is said to 
have been derived from the sect of Christians who were 
followers of St. Augustine. It is certain the Austins 
who came to Connecticut were a devout Christian peo- 
ple, as is evidenced by the devices of their antique coat 
of arms, which they brought from England and which 
had been in the possession of Willis Austin. 

The founder of the Austin family in America was John 
Austin. He came from England in the ship Hercules^ 
with his wife Constance, from Sandwich, County Kent. 
He died in Greenwich, Conn., September 5, 1657. David 
Austin (3), the grandfather of Willis Austin, was born in 
New Haven, May 6, 1732, and died February 5, i8oi. 
He was collector of customs when New Haven was the 
chief port of entry in this section of the country; also 
the founder and first president of the New Haven Bank. 
He had thirteen children, and at his death left a large 
estate to his surviving children. His eldest son, the Rev. 
David Austin, then settled over the First Presbyterian 
church of Elizabethtown, N. J., was executor of his 
father's estate. 

In the annals of New Haven it is recorded that young 
David Austin and his two uncles, John and David, were 
wounded in the battle for the defense of New Haven 
against the British, July 5, 1779. 

Mr. Austin's mother was Susan Rogers, daughter of 
Dr. David Rogers of Greenfield, Conn., born September 
i5> i77^> married September 11, 1797, died August 24, 
1870. 

Mr. Austin in 1851 married Louisa, daughter of the 
late E. B, M. Hughes, of New Haven, well remem- 



546 

bered for her personal attractions and true excellence 
of character, whose death occurred in Philadelphia, 
where they resided, in 1854, leaving a daughter of two 
years, who has since died. In 1864 he married Mary 
McComb, a very accomplished woman, daughter of John 
McComb, of a well known and prominent New York 
family, and granddaughter of John McComb, who was 
identified with almost all the progressive improve- 
ments of the day. One child, a son, named Willis Aus- 
tin, was born of this union in 1878. Mrs. Austin died 
in January, 1894. 

Mr. Austin was admitted to this society February 2, 
1891, as a descendant of David Austin, of New Haven^ 
Connecticut, wounded in the defense of New Haven 
during Tryon's raid, July 5, 1779, and of David Austin, a 
Surgeon in the army. 

COURTLANOT CUYNET BABCOCK. 

Courtlandt Guynet Babcock of Stonington died at his 
home in that place Wednesday evening, April i, 1896, 
after an illness of several months' duration. He was 
born in New York city, in 1842, and at the breaking out 
of the Civil war, was engaged in business at Chicago. 
Settling his affairs in that city, he came east in the 
spring of 1862, and began recruiting for a battery, but in 
the fall of that year accepted a commission as First 
Lieutenant in the 92d New York Volunteers, then with 
McClellan in the Peninsula. He joined the regiment at 
Suffolk, Va., and shortly afterward his brigade under 
Wessells proceeded to Newbern and participated in the 
battles of Kingston and Goldsboro. General Hunt was 
at that time made Brigadier-General, and appointed 
Lieutenant Babcock his aide, and Acting Assistant 
Adjutant-General. In July, 1863, General Hunt was 
sent to New Haven on account of illness, and Lieutenant 
Babcock was ordered to join him there. In the early 
spring of 1864 General Grant ordered General Hunt to 
Kansas and Missouri to inspect the Union troops in that 



547 

State, directing all that could be spared to report to 
Sherman. Among this number in July was Lieutenant 
Babcock, who had accompanied General Hunt on his 
western tour. Subsequently General Hunt was ordered 
to New York on account of ill health, Lieutenant Bab- 
cock accompanying him, but requesting to be returned 
to his regiment at the front. The 92d New York's time 
having expired, as many as volunteered for further ser- 
vice united with the 96th and were called the 96th New 
York Veteran Volunteers. When Lieutenant Babcock 
joined his old comrades in Virginia he received his 
Captaincy, and shortly afterward he was made Provost 
Marshal-General on General Deven's staff, Third Divi- 
sion, 24th Army Corps. Captain Babcock remained on 
this staff until the Union forces entered Richmond in 
April, 1865, when, returning to his regiment which had 
in the meantime been reinforced by a draft, he was pro- 
moted to the office of Major. After the fall of Richmond 
the regiment remained in Virginia doing police duty at 
different stations, Culpeper, Warrentown and Fredericks- 
burg, and he served for some time as Assistant Adjutant- 
General. He was mustered out in February, 1866, and 
made Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel for meritorious service. 
Much of Colonel Babcock's time after the war was 
spent in the banking business with the firm of Babcock 
Brothers & Co., New York. He was afterward elected 
treasurer of the Providence and Stonington Steamship 
Co., and for several years he held that position. In 1882 
he retired from active pursuits and took up his residence 
in Stonington, remaining in that place during the four- 
teen years which intervened before his death. He was 
an honored member of J. F. Trumbull Post, No. 82, G. 
A. R., having served several terms as its commander. 
He traced his ancestry direct to Colonel Harry Bab- 
cock, one of the most famous of the Revolutionary com- 
manders of Rhode Island. He was a burgess of the 
borough of Stonington, school committeeman of the 
Ninth school district for two years, and treasurer of 



548 

the Stonington Free Library. He was also an active 
member of the Second Congregational church and an 
officer of the Ecclesiastical society connected with it. 

Colonel Babcock married Miss Mary Woodruff , daugh- 
ter of Judge Woodruff, of Litchfield. Mrs. Babcock and 
four children survive him. He was a generous and 
affectionate husband and father, and in the community 
at large was universally esteemed and respected. His 
death at the early age of 54 removes an upright and 
useful citizen, who will be sincerely missed by a large 
circle of acquaintances and friends. 

He joined this society at its organization in April, 
1889, his state number being thirty-six, as a descendant 
of Colonel Harry Babcock. 

[^Contributed by Henry Robinson Palmer^ 

MRS. ABIGAIL JANE BALDWIN. 

Mrs. Abigail Jane Baldwin, widow of the late George 
Baldwin, died at Bridgeport, Connecticut, November 13, 
1895, ^t the age of 82 years. She was the daughter of 
Henry Nearing of Brookfield, Connecticut, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier who was born in 1758 and died in 1845. 
He was a private in Captain Joseph Smith's company 
of Colonel David Waterbury's regiment, raised on the 
first call for troops in Connecticut, April-May, 1775. 
This regiment marched to New York in June of that 
year, and about September 28 it was sent to the 
northern department, and took part in the operations 
along Lakes George and Champlain. 

Mrs. Baldwin rightly took pleasure and satisfaction in 
being recognized as entitled to the rare distinction of a 
Real Daughter of the American Revolution. It will be 
a surprise to many who are familiar with the rather ven- 
erable appearance of ex-Lieutenant-Governor Samuel E. 
Merwin of New Haven, to know that his mother was a 
niece of Mrs. Baldwin, they being nearly of the same 
age. General Merwin is a great-grandson of the sam.e 
Revolutionary ancestor — Henry Nearing. 



549 

Mrs. Baldwin was a lady of much energy of character, 
and without neglecting her family affairs, conducted a 
successful millinery business in Bridgeport for many 
years. She survived her husband fourteen years, and 
was distinguished for her interest in the Home and For- 
eign Mission work of her religious denomination (Con- 
gregational), as well as the round of local charities, 
proving herself a veritable Dorcas, in supplying and 
promoting home missionary boxes and baskets of sup- 
plies and clothing for poor families and orphans in her 
vicinity. 

Her descendants surviving are, one son and three 
daughters. She was admitted a member of this society 
January i6, 1894, 

[Contributed by Rowland B. Lacey.'] 

MRS. HELEN MARIA BOYD BALDWIN. 

Mrs. Helen Maria Boyd Baldwin, wife of George Bald- 
win, of New Haven, the eldest of six children, was born 
in New Haven, Connecticut, January 30th, 1830, and 
died at her home February 26th, 1893, aged 67, years. She 
was the daughter of the late Edward Boyd, of Middle- 
town, Connecticut, and Sarah Billings Pond, and great- 
granddaughter of Ebenezer Pond, who commanded a 
company which marched December, 1776, from Wren- 
tham, Massachusetts, to the defense of Providence, 
Rhode Island, and was in several engagements during 
that and the succeeding year. 

She was admitted to this society. May 16, 1892, as a 
descendant of Ebenezer Pond, who commanded a com- 
pany from Wrentham, Massachusetts. 

[Contributed by Edward E. Boyd.] 

SETH WOODFORD BISHOP. 

Seth Woodford Bishop died at his home in Hartford, 
Connecticut, July 30, 1895. Had he lived until October 



55^ 

he would have been seventy-four years old. He was born 
in West Hartford in 182 1. His parents were born in Avon, 
Mr. Bishop had his schooling in West Hartford, and 
when a young man learned the machinist's trade in New 
Britain. In 1849, when the gold fever broke out, Mr. 
Bishop was in a party organized in this section, mostly 
Hartford men, who sailed to California around Cape 
Horn. Mr. Bishop remained there ten years among the 
gold mines and was successful, although he had no un- 
usual good fortune. When he returned to Hartford he 
went to the Pratt & Whitney Company as foreman of the 
foundry and at that time was one of the largest stock- 
holders of the company. He remained there about 
twenty years and retired a dozen years ago. Since then 
he has not been actively engaged in business. He, how- 
ever, never lost interest in gold mining and on the or- 
ganization of the Suffolk Globe Mining Company, whose 
mine is located in San Miguel County, Colorado, Mr. 
Bishop became its president and held the office until a 
few months before his death when on account of ill 
health he resigned his position. Mr. Bishop was admitted 
to our society, June 5, 1890, as a descendant of Thomas 
Fitch Bishop of Farmington, a soldier who enlisted at 
the age of 16 years, and served under General Putnam. 
Mr. Bishop was a Mason and belonged to the lodge in 
West Hartford. 

CHARLES BUTTOLPH. 

In the death of Charles Buttolph, which occurred at 
his home on Rock street at 2:20 o'clock Monday after- 
noon, December 15, 1895, Preston loses one of its oldest 
and most highly respected citizens. 

Mr. Buttolph was born in Griswold, April 14, 1819, his 
father being George Buttolph, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary war. He came to Preston to work when a young 
man and there by patient and honest industry soon 
made for himself a home. He followed the occupation 
of farming nearly all his life, owning and improving for 



5SI 

many years, a farm situated on Zion's Hill, Preston. He 
was, however, for a short time engaged in the meat 
business on Water street in Norwich. In all his business 
transactions his honesty and integrity have made for 
him many friends. 

Mr. Buttolph was a humble and devout Christian, and 
has been a most faithful member of the Baptist church 
at Preston City for a period of fifty years. In politics, 
while not endeavoring to be prominent, he was faith- 
ful to his duties as a citizen, casting his ballot at each 
election for the maintenance of those principles in 
government which he believed to be right. Though 
usually connected with some political party, his love of 
country and its welfare caused him to change his party 
relations at different periods of his life in the interest of 
true patriotism. He served for a time as a member of 
the board of selectmen in the town of Preston. 

About five years ago Mr. Buttolph retired from active 
labor, and leaving his farm, removed to Rock street, 
where he afterwards resided. He was twice married 
and his second wife survives him. Besides his wife he 
leaves one half-brother, Mr. David Bromley of Brush- 
ville, Penn., and five step-children. In his home he was 
always kind and affectionate and in social circles he 
attracted many friends by his philanthropic deeds, sin- 
cere actions and upright principles. All who knew him 
will join in mourning his loss. 

He was admitted to this society, March 5, 1895, as a 
'^ true son " for the service of his father, as above stated. 

JAMES HENRY PERCIVAL CHAMBERLIN. 

James Henry Percival Chamberlin died at his home 
in New Haven, of pneumonia, May 31, 1895. 

He was the youngest of five children born to Abel 
Child Chamberlin and Angeline Alwood Hosmer. 

Mr. Chamberlin was born and always lived in New 
Haven; he was educated in the grammar schools and 
was a graduate of the High School of that city. 



SS2 

After completing his education he entered the employ- 
ment of his father, who was a successful furniture dealer. 
A few years later he was taken into the firm of A. C. 
Chamberlin & Sons. After the death of his father the 
firm was reorganized as the Chamberlin Furniture and 
Mantel Company, of which he was secretary until his 
death. 

Mr. Chamberlin was a noble, true man, of sterling 
character and pronounced business ability. 

He was an earnest, consistent Christian, devoted to 
the interests of the College Street Church, of which he 
was a worthy member. 

As secretary of his company his acquaintance with 
business men was extensive, and many letters were re- 
ceived by the firm from those who knew him in business 
relations, which were full of heartfelt expressions of 
sympathy and regret for the sudden taking away of one 
who was in the prime of life. Mr. Chamberlin was ad- 
mitted to our society January i8, 1892, as the lineal de- 
scendant of Abel Chamberlin, his great-grandfather, who 
was clerk of a company from Woodstock, Connecticut, 
commanded by Lieutenant Jonathan Morris. 

[Contributed by William E. Chandler?^ 

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON COMSTOCK. 

William Henry Harrison Comstock, of New London, 
died at his residence at that city February 24, 1895. He 
was born in East Lyme, March 20, 1819. He was a de- 
scendant of John Comstock, who came to this country in 
1635 and settled in Saybrook. Mr. Comstock was edu- 
cated in the public schools. In 1840 he came to New 
London and went into the mercantile business. After a 
few years he returned to East Lyme and later estab- 
lished here the firm of Comstock & Howard, from which 
he retired in 1888. He went into politics early in life 
and was an earnest Whig. In 1847 he was appointed 
Paymaster-General on the staff of Governor Clark Bis- 
sell of Norwalk. He was elected a member of the House 



553 

of Representatives from East Lyme in 1848; in 1854 was 
made Senator from the Ninth district and in 1859 he 
was chosen again to be Representative. While in the 
Senate he was one of six Senators selected to be mem- 
bers of the corporation of Yale College. He was post- 
master of East Lyme during the administrations of Fil- 
more and Lincoln, and was enrolling officer at East 
Lyme during the war, He was a member of the Baptist 
Church, of the Board of Trade, and a director of the 
New London City Bank. 

Mr. Comstock was greatly attached to our society, and 
was admitted March 29, 1890, as a grandson of Captain 
Peter Comstock, Captain in the 3d regiment of militia 
at New London in 1781. 

JOHN GUY CRUMP. 

John Guy Crump died in New London, June 19, 1894. 
He was descended from an ancestry whose active patri- 
otism assisted in laying the foundation of the republic. 
The universal regret at his death, which was invested 
with much of pathetic interest, was a tribute from the 
public to the character and worth of the man. 

Mr. Crump was possessed of a cultured mind and gen- 
erous impulses, in the contemplation of which we can 
well afford to miss some of those brilliant operations 
which count for so much in ordinary biography. 

He was elected to the state Legislature in 1879, when 
but twenty-three years of age. His speech, made in 
March, 1880, on the consideration of the majority and 
minority report on the boundary line between Connecti- 
cut and New York, attracted considerable attention. 

While possessed of great candor and a remarkable 
perceptive faculty, his temperament and sensitive 
nature forbade that unquestioned confidence so essen- 
tial to political leadership. 

The subject of our sketch was born in New London, 
Connecticut, June 30, 1856. He was graduated from the 
Norwich Free Academy, and entered Yale College in 



554 

i875- He did not, however, finish the collegiate course, 
but after a considerable period of study entered the law 
office of his father, the late William C. Crump. He was 
admitted to the bar, and in 1886, by an act of the Legis- 
lature, was made judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
which position he held at the time of his death. 

In his judicial capacity he was fearless and impartial, 
while a perceptive mind and a ready command of lan- 
guage rendered his address before court or jury forcible 
and intelligent. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Crump became editor of the Evening Tele- 
gram^ in which capacity he served till 1892, when he 
assumed the editorship of the Day, a position which he 
held at the time of his death. 

As a journalist, he recognized the folly of extreme 
partisanship and positive assertion, and the courteous 
tone of his articles was a reflex of that of his social 
intercourse. He might, perchance, have become more 
widely known had he transferred his labors to the recog- 
nized centers of thought and action. In his available 
knowledge and facility of expression, he fulfilled the 
conditions necessary to the professional journalist. 

He was interested in the cause of education, having 
served as a member of the Board of Education and as a 
trustee of the Bulkeley School. He was fond of all 
manly recreations, and was a recognized authority on 
some of the sports incident to forest and stream. In 
social intercourse he was charming and readily secured 
the friendship of all whom he met on terms of intimacy. 

Mr. Crump was admitted to membership in this soci- 
ety December 12, 1889, as a descendant from Richard 
Law, his great-grandfather, who was a midshipman of 
the American ship "Trumbull." 

[^Contributed by J. Lawrence Chew.'\ 

CHARLES JAMES COLE. 

Charles James Cole, of Hartford, died at his summer 
home, Laurel Way, Norfolk, August 16, 1895, from septic 



555 

fever. Two weeks before his death Mr. Cole left Hart- 
ford for Norfolk, coraplaining of the effects of a hard 
cold taken a few days before, and being much worn out 
with the important legal business in his care. For a 
few days after his arrival in Norfolk, Mr. Cole appeared 
to improve in health, but within the last three or four 
days before his death his symptoms became alarming, 
and Dr. Hamant, a Norfolk physician, who had charge 
of the case, summoned Dr. George C. Jarvis, of Hart- 
ford, for consultation. Mr. Cole passed a restless night 
and grew rapidly worse. There was no one present at 
the death bed but his immediate family and the nurse. 

Mr. Cole was born in Chatham, Conn., in June, 1839, 
his father having been a prosperous farmer. A few 
years after his birth his father went to East Berlin with 
his family and Mr. Cole's boyhood was spent in that 
town. His grandfather, Colonel Joseph Spencer, and 
great-grandfather, Marcus Cole, were both soldiers of 
the Revolution, the former having been a member of 
the ist regiment, Connecticut line, at Bunker Hill, and 
the latter a member of the 2d regiment of the line. 

Mr. Cole did not have an academical course in any 
college, but graduated from the Harvard Law School in 
1863, and in 1864 established himself in legal business 
on Central Row, and had his office on that street for 
thirty-one years, and for a great part of that time in the 
building of the Hartford Trust Company. He was 
never in legal partnership with anyone, but his office 
had been shared by Judge Wiley, Leonard Morse, Charles 
A. Safford, Henry A. Huntington and others. 

He early turned his attention to constitutional ques- 
tions of law, and in this branch of legal acquirement 
held an enviable position, appearing in many important 
cases before the Supreme Court, where the constitu- 
tionality of law was at issue. He was, in addition, 
one of the successful corporation lawyers of the state, 
and was attorney for many well-known Hartford corpo- 
rations, including the ^tna Life Insurance Company, 



556 

the Orient Insurance Company, the Connecticut General 
Life Insurance Company, having been a director in both 
the latter companies, and the United States Bank, of 
which he was a director. He was also counsel for the 
Berlin Iron Bridge Company, the Iowa Mortgage Com- 
pany, and for other corporations in the state. 

He was prominent in the Morris-Bulkeley quo warranto 
case over the governorship in 1891-3, appearing for the 
Republican side of the case in conjunction with the Hon. 
Henry C. Robinson and William C. Case. He was inva- 
riably thoroughly prepared in the cases he brought 
before the courts, was a close examiner of witnesses, and 
in argument clear and precise, never given to flows of 
rhetoric. He appeared before the Supreme Court as 
frequently as any lawyer of the Hartford county bar, 
and in important civil cases. 

Mr. Cole was a Republican and held an influential 
position in the leadership of the party, both in the state 
and in the city. He was chairman of the Republican State 
Central Committee in 1878, when Charles B. Andrews, 
now chief justice, was elected governor, and appeared 
again as the head of that committee in the campaigns 
which resulted in the election of Henry B. Harrison and 
Phineas C. Lounsbury to the governorship. He was a 
shrewd organizer, keeping his own counsel well, and 
manipulating his forces with much skill. He was a 
candidate for the state Senate in 1873 against the late 
Charles Murray Pond. 

Mr. Cole was for many years active in local politics,, 
and from 1877 to 1879 was city attorney. He was fre- 
quently heard in town meetings and in Republican cau- 
cuses. He was on the side of clean politics and good 
citizenship. 

He was offered the chief justiceship of the state by 
Governor Bulkeley before it was given to Chief Justice 
Andrews, but the honor was declined. 

Mr. Cole's services were in great demand during 
legislative sessions, and the session closing in July, 1895^ 



557 

was no exception. He appeared before nearly every 
committee in support of or against most of the impor- 
tant measures that were before the houses. Perhaps the 
appearance that attracted the most attention was his 
conduct of the opposition to the tuberculosis bill on 
behalf of the farmers of the state, which was so well 
done that the bill was very much modified before the 
committee reported it. He also appeared before the 
committee on the East Hartford bridge, as counsel for 
the Berlin Iron Bridge company. He was in the habit 
of saying to those who wished his services before the 
Legislature, " I shall do no button-holing of members^ 
but if you wish me to make an argument before a com- 
mittee or to present a bill, I will do what I can." 

He was a man of great industry and energy, and of 
marvelous memory. He prepared his cases with little: 
or no assistance, and was not addicted to working them 
up by proxy. He wished to know for himself, exactly 
what the situation in any particular case was. His. 
income from his business during the past few years was 
very large and he was obliged to refuse many retainers 
for lack of time to attend to more business. 

The wonderful gift of off-hand memory was greatly 
developed in Mr. Cole and instances of its use are well 
remembered by his friends. In the conduct of the 
tuberculosis case for the farmers before the legislative 
committee at the last session, he gave a fine illustration of 
it. He had posted himself on the technical as well as the 
popular and practical phases of the disease and in his 
cross-examination of physicians of clear intellect and 
specially qualified in the particular matter in hand 
showed that he knew even more than they did about 
tuberculosis, and had his knowledge at the tip of his 
tongue to great advantage. 

In all matters Mr. Cole was original; in his lines of 
thought, manner of speech and in his way of getting at 
things. Notwithstanding his prominence in public 
affairs he was an extremely modest man, never putting 

37 



558 

himself forward unless occasion demanded. To news- 
paper men, who frequently had occasion to interview 
him about public matters in which he held the part of 
counselor, he was always courteous, but seldom commu- 
nicative. He would, when giving facts, always say, 
" You are at liberty to use this material, but use it as 
your own. Don't quote me." It was this modest char- 
acteristic that prevented him from being a patron of 
the photographer. When the members of the Hartford 
county bar were being posed for a group picture at 
Lloyd's, Mr. Cole could not be induced by his brother 
lawyers to sit before the camera, and none of the photo- 
graphers in the city remember of his having sat for 
them. 

His residence in Hartford was at the corner of Wood- 
land and Collins streets, and his home, built within a 
few years, was the home of a student and a lover of the 
beautiful. He also had a farm in Norfolk, where he 
died, on which he was accustomed to spend his sum- 
mers or such portion of them as he gave up to recrea- 
tion. He also carried on the homestead farm in East 
Berlin, visiting it frequently. 

Mr. Cole leaves a wife, who was Miss Bessie Hunting- 
ton, daughter of the late Judge Samuel H. Huntington, 
and three children. He was an attendant at Trinity 
Church. Mr. Cole came into our society February 7, 1890, 
as a grandson of Abner Cole of Chatham, a Corporal in the 
2d Connecticut regiment, Colonel Spencer, May, 1775. 
In 1777, he was a Sergeant in the 2d Connecticut line, 
under Colonel Jedediah Huntington, and was afterwards 
promoted to Sergeant-Major and Ensign. This regiment 
was at Valley Forge through the memorable winter of 
1777-78, and at the battle of Monmouth. He served 
through the war until the army was disbanded in June, 
1783. He was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 
Mr. Cole was also great-grandson of Marcus Cole, of Chat- 
ham, Ensign in Colonel Spencer's regiment, raised on the 
first call for troops in May, 1775, and served until the ex- 



559 

piration of service, December, 1775. In 1776, he was ist 
Lieutenant in the 2 2d Continental regiment. Colonel 
Samuel Wyllys, detached as Assistant-Engineer. In 
1777, he was ist Lieutenant in the ist Connecticut line, 
commanded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington, and was 
in service until January 6, 1778. 

BENJAMIN DOUGLAS. 

Benjamin Douglas, of Middletown, died at his resi- 
dence in that city June 26, 1894. He was the son of 
William Douglas, of Northford, Connecticut, and was 
born in that place April 3, 18 16, being therefore 78 
years old. His father was a farmer, and his grandfather 
was Colonel William Douglas, of a New Haven regi- 
ment, in the Revolutionary war. 

The only educational advantages received by the 
younger Douglas were a few months' attendance at the 
district school during the winter, the remaining months 
of the year being spent on the farm. When only 16 
years of age, he entered an apprenticeship with a ma- 
chinist in Middletown, and in 1839, seven years later, 
joined his brother William in the ordinary foundry and 
machine business. William Douglas was the first suc- 
cessful manufacturer of metallic pumps in this country, 
and was four years Benjamin's senior. The first patent 
granted on metallic pumps was August 20, 1835, and was 
signed by Andrew Jackson, President of the United 
States. 

In 1842 this firm invented the celebrated revolving 
stand pump, which proved a great success, and the busi- 
ness steadily increased from year to year, its trade ex- 
tending throughout the United States, South America, 
Sandwich Islands, West Indies, Europe, Asia and Aus- 
tralia. 

While attending to business Mr. Douglas found time 
for devotion to public enterprises and works of benevo- 
lence. He was a warm friend to the colored race, and 
when the irrepressible conflict was brought to a final 



issue by force of arms, he was foremost among his fel- 
low citizens to provide means for crushing the rebellion. 

He held many positions of trust and honor. He was 
mayor of Middletown from 1850 to 1855, and a mem- 
ber of the General Assembly in 1854 and again in 1872; 
presidential elector in i860, casting one of the six elec- 
toral votes for Abraham Lincoln; was Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor of Connecticut in 1861 and 1862. 

In 1832 he united by letter with the South Congrega- 
tional Church of Middletown, and was afterwards one of 
the pillars of the church; for more than thirty years he 
filled the office of deacon, and was for many years 
superintendent of the Sunday school. 

He was married April 3, 1838 (his 22d birthday), to 
Miss Mary Adeline, daughter of Elias and Grace Totten 
Mansfield Parker, and a niece of Major-General Joseph 
K. Mansfield. Six children was the result of the union. 
In the death of Mr. Douglas the last of the original firm 
of W. & B. Douglas, pump manufacturers, is passed 
away; the city, the state, the nation loses a warm friend 
and a loyal citizen. 

Mr. Douglas had varied business interests. He was 
director and president of the People's Fire Insurance 
Company, first president and director in the First 
National Bank, president of Farmers' and Mechanics' 
Bank, and for twenty-five years president of the Ameri- 
can Bible Society. He, with Judge A. B. Calef, in i860, 
formulated the law which governs town elections. 

Mr. Douglas was an early member of our society, 
coming into it April 20, 1889. He was grandson of Wil- 
liam Douglas, of Northford, Connecticut, Captain of the 
4th company, ist Connecticut regiment, which marched 
to New York in June, 1775, and afterwards in Septem- 
ber took part in operations about Lakes George and 
Champlain and in Canada. In 1776 he was made Major 
in Colonel Ward's regiment, and in June of that year 
was made Colonel of the 5th battalion of Wadsworth's 
brigade. He was in the battles of^Long Island and 



56i 

White Plains. January i, 1777, he was made Colonel of 
the 6th regiment, Connecticut line. He died May 28 
following, from the effects of wounds. 

RALPH CLARK DUNHAM. 

Dr. Ralph Clark Dunham, of New Britain, Connecti- 
cut, was the fourth and youngest son of Ralph and 
Melinda (Hyde) Dunham, and was born in Mansfield, 
Connecticut. His ancestry is traceable in all its lines to 
the earliest settlers of Connecticut, including not only 
the family name, but the names of Hyde, Clark, Web- 
ster, Babcock, and Lyman. His grandfathers, Jonathan 
Dunham and Elijah Clark Hyde, were soldiers of the 
Revolution, and his great-grandfather, Elijah Hyde, was 
a Major of Horse. 

His early experiences were similar to those of most 
New England boys reared on a farm. He had the usual 
common school advantages which he improved, but 
exhausted when about eighteen, and then left the farm 
to seek his fortune. Having unusual mechanical skill 
he was attracted to dentistry, then in the early stages 
of the art. He soon became one of the leading dentists 
of the state. He practiced his profession in New Brit- 
ain about thirty-five years with the highest success. No 
less than twenty-three young men, including some of 
the best dentists in Connecticut, received their profes- 
sional training in his office. He was largely instru- 
mental in introducing the use of ansesthetics in den- 
tistry after the discovery of Dr. Wells, with whom Dr. 
Dunham co-operated. He spent nearly a year in Bos- 
ton, New York, and other cities instructing dentists in 
the use of nitrous oxide gas. The doctor was a keen 
sportsman, and being possessed of singular mechanical 
skill he made his own guns, rods and other apparatus 
which he was accustomed to use every autumn in the 
Adirondacks or in northern Vermont. A large room 
adjoining his office was fitted up as a mechanical labor- 
atory, and it was the diversion of his hours of leisure to 



S62 

work in metal and wood. He carved from cherry and 
mahogany many pieces of furniture of original design 
and fine workmanship. Among other things he made 
more than one hundred violins, many of which are now 
used by skilled violinists, and are pronounced to be of 
superior merit. 

Dr. Dunham was a delightful companion and a faith- 
ful friend. He was a member of the South Congrega- 
tional Church of New Britain, and of several local organ- 
izations. He was a Mason of high degree, and during 
his membership of Harmony Lodge he filled every 
office. He held at different times several city offices, 
taking most pleasure in that of park commissioner, of 
which board he was a member for a number of years. 

In 1857 he married Charlotte A. Rumrill, of East Hart- 
ford, who survives him. He died at his home, February 
II, 1896, leaving no children. He was admitted to this 
society February 4, 1890, as a descendant of Elijah 
Hyde, of Norwich, Major commanding the 2d regiment 
of Light Horse, at the battle of Stillwater, October 2, 
1777. He had also several other ancestors who served 
in the Revolution. 

\Contributed by Sylvester C. £>imham.'\ 

DAf^lEL CADY EATON. 

Daniel Cady Eaton, professor of botany in Yale Uni- 
versity, died at his home in New Haven on June 29th, 
1895. 

He was of old New England stock, and the name has 
been associated with the progress of botany in this 
country for more than eighty years. His grandfather 
was that pioneer of American science. Professor Amos 
Eaton, who perhaps more than any other one man stim- 
ulated the study of natural history in this country dur- 
ing the second and third decades of this century. 

Several of his children were educated in scientific 
pursuits. One son, Amos B. Eaton, although sharing 
the scientific tastes of the other children, was trained 



S63 

for the army and graduated at West Point in 1826. He 
was in the Seminole, Mexican and the Civil wars, and 
rose to the rank of Brigadier-General. 

General Eaton married Elizabeth Selden, who also was 
of New England stock, and Daniel Cady Eaton, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born at Fort Gratiot, in Michi- 
gan, September 12th, 1834. In the changes incident to 
the military duties of the father, the family, during the 
youth of the son, had no very permanent place of abode. 
The mother was a sister of the eminent jurists, Samuel 
L. Selden and Henry R. Selden, of Rochester, New York, 
and she lived in that city during a part of his boyhood, 
and until the close of the Mexican war. Later, he was 
for a while a student in the Rensselaer Institute at 
Troy, and still later, in General Russell's Military School 
at New Haven. 

He entered Yale College in 1853, and was graduated 
in 1857, having among his classmates an unusual num- 
ber of persons who have since become eminent as pro- 
fessors in colleges. He was already a zealous student 
in botany, and published his first paper "On Three New 
Ferns from California and Oregon," in the American 
Journal of Science in 1856, while a junior in college. 

After graduation he studied botany with Professor 
Gray at Harvard for three years, and received in i860 
the degree of B. S. in that institution, and that of M. A 
in course at Yale. 

(The above was taken from the sketch of the life of Professor 
Eaton, written by Professor Wm. H. Brewer of Yale University, 
and published in the American Journal of Science, Vol. L, August, 
1895.) 

In July, 1864, he was elected professor of botany at 
the Sheffield Scientific School, Yale College, and at the 
time of his death occupied this chair in the University 
proper. 

Professor Eaton was one of the most eminent author- 
ities in this country on botany and was the author of 
several works on the same, chief among which is The 



564 

Ferns of North America^ a sumptuous quarto in two 
volumes, published in 1879-80, and dedicated to his old 
instructor, Professor Gray. It has been truly said of 
Professor Eaton, '' He was one of nature's noblemen, a 
prince among men, a man of high aims and aspirations, 
of generous impulses and heart, a true gentleman, re- 
gardful of others, kindly in spirit and liberal in mind." 
He was a valued member of St. Thomas' Episcopal 
Church and a sincere Christian. 

He married, February 13th, 1866, Caroline, daughter 
of Treadwell Ketchum, of New York. She, a son and a 
daughter survive him. He joined this society May 10, 
1892, as the lineal descendant of Abel Eaton, his great- 
grandfather, who was a Corporal in the 5th company of 
the 17th Albany County, New York, regiment, com- 
manded by Colonel Whitney. 

[Contributed by William E. Chandler ?[ 

ERASTUS GEER. 

Erastus Geer, of Lebanon, died at his home in that 
town, April 26, 1895. 

Mr. Geer was the son of David Geer and Anna Gallup, 
daughter of Isaac and Anna (Smith) Gallup, and was 
born in the town of Lebanon, October 9, 1823. His pa- 
ternal ancestor was George Geer, who, tradition says, 
was one of the two sons of Jonathan Geer, of the county 
of Devon, England. 

Mr. Geer was reared on the farm in Lebanon on which 
his father settled in 1817. His advantages for an educa- 
tion were such as the common schools of the day 
afforded, supplemented with a few terms at Bacon Acad- 
emy, Colchester. At the age of 19 he commenced teach- 
ing school and taught ten terms during the winters, 
working on the farm summers. 

Being the youngest of the family he very naturally 
continued the occupancy of the homestead. He was 
energetic, prudent and practical, and was a man highly 
respected at home and abroad. As a farmer, he ranked 



565 

among the most enterprising of the town. In politics 
he was a life-long Republican, and as such had held im- 
portant offices of the town. 

In 1877 he was a member of the state Legislature, serv- 
ing on the committee on claims. In 1878 he was ap- 
pointed one of the county commissioners of New London 
county and served a second term. He was twice mar- 
ried; first to Almira H. Saxton, May 12, 1852, who died 
May 30, 1853; second, to Frances A., daughter of Joseph 
and Laura (Witlet) Geer, of Ledyard, November 21, 
1861. 

Mr. Geer's farm was a large one of 500 acres, which is 
in a good state of cultivation, and well watered by the 
Yantic river, which flows through it. Among Lebanon's 
substantial men and representative farmers none, per- 
haps, have accomplished more as farmers than the Geer 
family. 

Mr. Geer was a member of Goshen Congregational 
Church in Lebanon. He was the last of seven children, 
five sons and two daughters. The probity of the de- 
ceased was never questioned; he was universally liked 
and admired, and his death will be learned with wide- 
spread regret. He is survived by a wife and son, Wil- 
liam H., who will continue the management of the farm. 

He assisted in establishing the county home in Pres- 
ton. He patented and manufactured an iron window 
frame for stalls in stables. 

Mr. Geer was a man of strong individuality. While 
serving as county commissioner he believed in a limited 
number of liquor licenses and would sign only so many 
in a year. All other licenses which were issued would 
have only the signatures of the other two commis- 
sioners. 

Mr, Geer was admitted to our society. May 28, 1891, as 
grandson of Isaac Gallup, of Groton, Lieutenant of the 
loth company, 6th Connecticut regiment, Colonel Sam- 
uel H. Parsons, 1775. When in the following year th